A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘global warming

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

leave a comment »

  • Kambiz Kamrani at Anthropology.net notes new findings suggesting that the creation of cave art by early humans is product of the same skills that let early humans use language.
  • Davide Marchetti at Architectuul looks at some overlooked and neglected buildings in and around Rome.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait explains how Sirius was able to hide the brilliant Gaia 1 star cluster behind it.
  • Centauri Dreams looks at new procedures for streamlining the verification of new exoplanet detections.
  • Crooked Timber notes the remarkably successful and once-controversial eroticization of plant reproduction in the poems of Erasmus Darwin.
  • Dangerous Minds notes how an errant Confederate flag on a single nearly derailed the career of Otis Redding.
  • Detecting biosignatures from exoplanets, Bruce Dorminey notes, may require “fleets” of sensitive space-based telescopes.
  • Far Outliers looks at persecution of non-Shi’ite Muslims in Safavid Iran.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at the history of the enslavement of Native Americans in early colonial America, something often overlooked by later generations.
  • This video shared by Language Log, featuring two Amazon Echos repeating texts to each other and showing how these iterations change over time, is oddly fascinating.
  • At Lawyers, Guns and Money, Erik Loomis is quite clear about the good sense of Will Wilkinson’s point that controversy over “illegal” immigration is actually deeply connected to an exclusivist racism that imagines Hispanics to not be Americans.
  • Lingua Franca, at the Chronicle of Higher Education, looks at the uses of the word “redemption”, particularly in the context of the Olympics.
  • The LRB Blog suggests Russiagate is becoming a matter of hysteria. I’m unconvinced, frankly.
  • The Map Room Blog shares a map showing global sea level rise over the past decades.
  • Marginal Revolution makes a case for Americans to learn foreign languages on principle. As a Canadian who recently visited a decidedly Hispanic New York, I would add that Spanish, at least, is one language quite potentially useful to Americans in their own country.
  • Drew Rowsome writes about the striking photographs of Olivier Valsecchi.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes that, in the 2030s, gravitational wave observatories will be so sensitive that they will be able to detect black holes about to collide years in advance.
  • Towleroad lists festival highlights for New Orleans all over the year.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how recent changes to the Russian education system harming minority languages have inspired some Muslim populations to link their language to their religion.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell makes the case that Jeremy Corbyn, through his strength in the British House of Commons, is really the only potential Remainder who is in a position of power.
Advertisements

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

leave a comment »

  • Kambiz Kamrani at Anthropology.net notes that lidar scanning has revealed that the pre-Columbian city of Angamuco, in western Mexico, is much bigger than previously thought.
  • James Bow makes an excellent case for the revitalization of VIA Rail as a passenger service for longer-haul trips around Ontario.
  • D-Brief notes neurological evidence suggesting why people react so badly to perceived injustices.
  • The Dragon’s Tales takes a look at the list of countries embracing thorough roboticization.
  • Andrew LePage at Drew Ex Machina takes a look at the most powerful launch vehicles, both Soviet and American, to date.
  • Far Outliers considers Safavid Iran as an imperfect gunpowder empire.
  • Despite the explanation, I fail to see how LGBTQ people could benefit from a cryptocurrency all our own. What would be the point, especially in homophobic environments where spending it would involve outing ourselves? Hornet Stories shares the idea.
  • Imageo notes that sea ice off Alaska has actually begun contracting this winter, not started growing.
  • JSTOR Daily notes how the production and consumption of lace, and lace products, was highly politicized for the Victorians.
  • Language Hat makes a case for the importance of translation as a political act, bridging boundaries.
  • Language Log takes a look at the pronunciation and mispronunciation of city names, starting with PyeongChang.
  • This critical Erik Loomis obituary of Billy Graham, noting the preacher’s many faults, is what Graham deserves. From Lawyers, Guns and Money, here.
  • Bernard Porter at the LRB Blog is critical of the easy claims that Corbyn was a knowing agent of Communist Czechoslovakia.
  • The Map Room Blog shares this map from r/mapporn, imagining a United States organized into states as proportionally imbalanced in population as the provinces of Canada?
  • Marginal Revolution rightly fears a possible restart to the civil war in Congo.
  • Neuroskeptic reports on a controversial psychological study in Ghana that saw the investigation of “prayer camps”, where mentally ill are kept chain, as a form of treatment.
  • The NYR Daily makes the case that the Congolese should be allowed to enjoy some measure of peace from foreign interference, whether from the West or from African neighbous (Rwanda, particularly).
  • At the Planetary Society Blog, Emily Lakdawalla looks at the many things that can go wrong with sample return missions.
  • Rocky Planet notes that the eruption of Indonesian volcano Sinabung can be easily seen from space.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes how the New Horizons Pluto photos show a world marked by its subsurface oceans.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that, although fertility rates among non-Russians have generally fallen to the level of Russians, demographic momentum and Russian emigration drive continue demographic shifts.
  • Livio Di Matteo at Worthwhile Canadian Initiative charts the balance of federal versus provincial government expenditure in Canada, finding a notable shift towards the provinces in recent decades.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell makes the case, through the example of the fire standards that led to Grenfell Tower, that John Major was more radical than Margaret Thatcher in allowing core functions of the state to be privatized.
  • Arnold Zwicky takes a look at some alcoholic drinks with outrĂ© names.

[NEWS] Five science links: Great Lakes, cold in global warming, Orion, baboons, Alberta sparrow song

leave a comment »

  • This CityLab post reviews a fantastic map book about the Great Lakes and their history.
  • An upcoming bout of Arctic chill in the United States (Canada, too) is connected to the ongoing process of climate change featuring global warming. Bloomberg explains.
  • National Geographic takes a look at upcoming testing for the United States’ new Orion program, a spacecraft that may take people back to the Moon.
  • 52 baboons escaped a Paris zoo, in so demonstrating their smarts. National Geographic explains.
  • Sparrows in the oilpatch, National Observer notes, are changing their song in order to compete with noise from machinery.

[ISL] Five islands links: Toronto Islands, Vancouver Island, Newfoundland, Louisiana, Jersey

leave a comment »

  • The idea of making the Toronto Islands an officially designated bird sanctuary makes sense on a lot of levels. The Toronto Star reports.
  • The community of Saanich, on Vancouver Island, is expected to host the biggest marijuana farm in Canada come legalization, making many there unhappy. Global News reports.
  • Trump tariffs may doom a pulp and paper mills in the western Newfoundland city of Corner Brook. CBC reports.
  • Wired features this heartbreaking choices facing the inhabitants of the Louisiana town of Isle de Jean Charles as their island submerges beneath rising waters. What will they do? Where will they go? Can the community survive?
  • CityMetric tells the story about how people on the Channel Island of Jersey wanted to build a bridge to France, why this didn’t happen, and how this relates to Brexit.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

  • ‘Nathan Smith at Apostrophen points out the profound wrongness of a same-sex romance novel that has (for starters) protagonists involved in LGBT conversion camps described sympathetically.
  • Centauri Dreams notes the exciting new detailed surface map of Titan. Among other things, that world has a sea level common to all its liquid bodies, and they have sharp shores.
  • The Crux notes a new effort to understand Antarctica underneath the ice. What happened the last time its ice melted?
  • Bruce Dorminey notes that Venus is actually really important for astronomers who are interested in extraterrestrial life.
  • The Everyday Sociology Blog explains why it is important to learn about social theory if you’re a sociologist. Discourse matters.
  • Far Outliers notes the many translations of Hawaii’s “TheBus” into the Asian languages spoken there.
  • Hornet Stories notes research suggesting that product ads targeting LGBTQ markets can have good knock-on effects for these products’ general market share.
  • At In Media Res, Russell Arben Fox has started a series looking back at some of the best songs of 1978.
  • JSTOR Daily notes two education papers suggesting ways art education can improve empathy among students.
  • Language Hat notes a genetic study of populations in the Chachapoyas region of coastal Peru suggesting people there were not displaced by Incan expansion.
  • Language Log reports on a study that examines connections between a person’s lexical diversity and the progress of degenerative brain health issues.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money reports on the possibility that Russian money may have been funneled through the NRA.
  • The NYR Daily reports on the intensely personal performance art of Patty Chang.
  • The Planetary Society Blog reports on the latest discoveries and events surrounding the Dawn probe in its permanent Ceres orbit.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes evidence that extrasolar visitor ‘Oumuamua has been deeply shaped by its encounters with cosmic particles.
  • Transit Toronto shares detailed depictions of some of the new public art installations to be housed in six stations on the Eglinton Crosstown LRT.
  • Window on Eurasia notes the growing presence of Central Asian migrants in the smaller communities of Russia. (Chinese, unsurprisingly, have not made it there.)

[URBAN NOTE] Seven New York City links

This extended feature from The New York Times makes the case that New York City’s subway system desperately needs the massive funding it needs, else the city itself start to fall apart. https://www.nytimes.com/2018/01/03/magazine/subway-new-york-city-public-transportation-wealth-inequality.html

A New York City plan to divest from companies that could be assigned responsibility for climate change and sea level rise is certainly a provocative idea. https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2018/jan/10/new-york-city-plans-to-divest-5bn-from-fossil-fuels-and-sue-oil-companies

The NYR Daily celebrates the life of Fred Bass, the man who built The Strand bookstore in downtown Manhattan. I visited Monday; his life’s work remains a success. http://www.nybooks.com/daily/2018/01/04/fred-bass-maestro-of-the-strand/

Kim Stanley Robinson’s thoughts on New York City are worth sharing. (The passage in _2312_ where his protagonist went up the Hudson by a flooded Manhattan _was_ one of the best parts of that book, to provide an example other than this novel he wrote.) https://motherboard.vice.com/en_us/article/43d39m/sci-fi-author-kim-stanley-robinson-talks-about-new-york-2140

I have to admit to quite liking the Met’s ideal of potentially free admission for all, though I suppose that if this gorgeous museum needs the funding … https://www.nytimes.com/2018/01/04/arts/design/the-met-should-be-open-to-all-the-new-pay-policy-is-a-mistake.html

Former TTC chief Andy Byford is now in New York City, overseeing the MTA. I wish him luck. https://www.thestar.com/news/world/2018/01/16/torontos-ex-transit-boss-andy-byford-rides-subway-on-first-day-of-new-new-york-city-job.html

The traffic safety program of the city of Toronto remains vastly underfunded compared to that of New York City. http://www.metronews.ca/news/toronto/2018/01/16/while-new-york-city-s-vision-zero-results-are-lauded-toronto-s-have-been-lacklustre.html

[ISL] Five links on islands: Puerto Rico, Japan, Newfoundland, climate change, Koh Pich

  • New York Magazine carries this article looking at the dreadful aftermath of Hurricane Maria in Puerto Rico and the lagging response of government (American, mainly). Heads should roll.
  • Japan Times carries an article looking at the various strategies used by different Japanese islands and archipelagoes to try to resist depopulation. Some work better than others.
  • Could the outposts of Newfoundland benefit not from consolidation and planned depopulation, but from planned resettlement? The precedents from Ireland and Italy are interesting, at least. CBC reports.
  • The Inter Press Service notes that climate change, including rising sea levels and growing storms, will hit smart island nations badly.
  • Morgan Fache at Roads and Kingdoms reports on how Koh Pich, “Diamond Island”, offshore of Phmon Penh, has been emptied of its population of fishers to make way for an elite real estate development.