A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘global warming

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

  • Centauri Dreams looks at evidence that Ceres’ Occator Crater, an apparent cryovolcano, may have been recently active.
  • Crooked Timber’s John Quiggin wonders what would have happened had Kerensky accepted the German Reichstag’s proposal in 1917.
  • Dangerous Minds looks at some fun that employees at a bookstore in France got up to with book covers.
  • Cody Delistraty describes F. Scott Fitzgerald’s utter failure to fit into Hollywood.
  • A Fistful of Euros hosts Alex Harrowell’s blog post taking a look at recent history from a perspective of rising populism.
  • io9 reports on a proposal from the Chinese city of Lanzhou to set up a water pipeline connecting it to Siberia’s Lake Baikal.
  • Imageo notes a recent expedition by Norwegian scientists aiming at examining the winter ice.
  • Strange Maps links to an amazing graphic mapping the lexical distances between Europe’s languages.
  • Window on Eurasia argues that Russia is on the verge of a new era of population decline, and shares a perhaps alarming perspective on the growth of Muslim populations in Russia.

[LINK] “Climate-driven Arctic permafrost collapse causing dramatic change”

Digital Journal’s Karen Graham reports on how the collapse of the permafrost in the Arctic North of Canada threatens further climate catastrophe.

hawing Arctic permafrost are slumping and disintegrating, sending rivers of carbon-rich mud and silt into waterways. This will lead to a climate-driven geomorphic transformation of our ecosystem.

A study published in February 2017, in the journal Geology, titled “Climate-driven thaw of permafrost-preserved glacial landscapes, northwestern Canada,” describes the research efforts and findings made by scientists with the Northwest Territories Geological Survey in assessing the increasing intensity of permafrost collapse in the Arctic regions of Canada.

Many readers may remember the July 2015 collapse of a small, unnamed lake in the NWT, documented with a remote camera that showed it falling off a cliff and breaking through a melting earthen rampart.

Thawing permafrost has already caused noticeable changes in the landscape in some Arctic regions and scientists have been tracking temperature changes and thawing of the permafrost for years. When permafrost thaws, large thaw slumps develop, some of them impacting over 30 hectares (74 acres) in area. This can dramatically alter slopes and impact downstream environments.

In 2015, Steve Kokelj of the NWT Geological Survey told the Canadian Press the thaw slumps were getting bigger and more numerous with the increase in temperatures and rainfall. At that time, Kokelj estimated the land affected by slumping had almost doubled in the last 30 to 40 years.

Written by Randy McDonald

March 1, 2017 at 9:00 pm

[LINK] “Antarctica hits record high temperature at balmy 63.5°F”

Reuters reports that just under two years ago, Argentina’s Esperanza Base on the tip of the Antarctic Peninsula recorded a record temperature akin to that of a warm spring day.

An Argentine research base near the northern tip of the Antarctic peninsula has set a heat record at a balmy 63.5° Fahrenheit (17.5 degrees Celsius), the U.N. weather agency said on Wednesday.

The Experanza base set the high on March 24, 2015, the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) said after reviewing data around Antarctica to set benchmarks to help track future global warming and natural variations.

“Verification of maximum and minimum temperatures help us to build up a picture of the weather and climate in one of Earth’s final frontiers,” said Michael Sparrow, a polar expert with the WMO co-sponsored World Climate Research Programme.

Antarctica locks up 90 percent of the world’s fresh water as ice and would raise sea levels by about 60 meters (200 ft) if it were all to melt, meaning scientists are concerned to know even about extremes around the fringes.

Written by Randy McDonald

March 1, 2017 at 8:30 pm

[URBAN NOTE] “So long, normal weather: Toronto just had the warmest February on record”

CBC News’ Kate McGillivray reports that this February just past is the warmest Toronto has been ever recorded as experiencing.

It’s official — Toronto just lived through the warmest February in at least 80 years, says Dave Phillips, senior climatologist at Environment Canada.

“It also had the warmest February temperature ever, up to 17.7 C on the 23rd,” which broke records going back to the 1840s, he told CBC Radio’s Metro Morning.

The month didn’t start off this way.

“We had temperatures at -12 C,” said Phillips. “We had a month’s worth of snow in the first ten days.”

After that, the jet stream, a narrow band of strong wind, moved “almost into a summer position, well north of us in Northern Ontario. It allowed the warm air to just flood into Southern Ontario,” he said.

All that warm air led to 12 days in a row with melting record temperatures. “So clearly, the look and the feel of winter disappeared in February,” Phillips said.

Written by Randy McDonald

March 1, 2017 at 8:15 pm

[BLOG] Some Monday links

  • blogTO shares media exploring how Toronto was marketed internationally in the 1980s. This decade apparently saw less concentration on landmarks and more on cultural activities.
  • The Map Room Blog links to a National Geographic collection of the childhood maps of cartographers.
  • Marginal Revolution notes that the loosening of China’s one-child policy has not resulted in much change.
  • Justin Petrone wonders if Estonians are weird.
  • Steve Munro reports on the many, many problematic things coming out of Metrolinx, including fare-by-distance and the ongoing PRESTO disasters.
  • Supernova Condensate shares a thought-provoking set of statues on global warming, Follow the Leaders.
  • Torontoist’s Kieran Delamont notes the astonishing thoughtlessness of new fashion brand Homeless Toronto.
  • Window on Eurasia looks at a Belarus in a state of political ferment that might–might–be pre-revolutionary, and wonders if disbanding Russia’s ethnic republics could be profoundly destabilizing.

[PHOTO] Green Lawn, Kew Gardens Tennis Club

Green Lawn, Kew Gardens Tennis Club

Just metres from the cold waters of Lake Ontario, the fields of the Kew Gardens Tennis Club were greening already on the 24th of February.

Written by Randy McDonald

February 27, 2017 at 10:45 am

[URBAN NOTE] “Toronto sets record for warmest February day”

The Toronto Star‘s Evelyn Kwong reported early this morning bout yesterday’s record-breaking temperatures. Today was cooler, as predicted. Walking by Lake Ontario down at Woodbine Beach this afternoon, this late February day felt like a cool spring day.

Torontonians enjoyed an especially balmy day Thursday, but it wasn’t just a record high for Feb. 23; it was the warmest February day on record.

Spring temperatures soared to 17.7 C by early afternoon, before cooling down to 12 C closer to the evening.

The previous record for the warmest day ever in February was set last year on Feb. 3 with a high of 16 C. Weather records for Toronto started in 1938. The temperatures also shattered a 33-year-old record high of 14.9 C for Feb. 23, set in 1984.

On Friday, temperatures are expected to dip down back down to a high of 6 C, which is still over the average temperature for February. There will be a 30-per-cent chance of rain and drizzle, and possible thunderstorms.

Written by Randy McDonald

February 24, 2017 at 9:00 pm