A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘global warming

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

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  • Centauri Dreams considers the idea of dispatching a fleet of sail-equipped probes to map the asteroid belt.
  • Crux considers the importance of the invention of zero for mathematics.
  • D-Brief notes that Scotland’s oldest snow patch is set to melt imminently.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to a paper looking at the stability of multiplanetary systems in star clusters.
  • Imageo notes the modest recovery of icecaps in the Arctic this summer.
  • Language Log notes the importance of Kazakhstan’s shift to using the Latin script for the Kazakh language.
  • The LRB Blog reports on a writer’s visit to Helsinki.
  • The Map Room Blog notes a giant relief map of Guatemala, built to reinforce claims to what is now Belize.
  • The NYR Daily considers the continued salience of race in the fragile liberal-democratic world, in America and Europe.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer wonders if the heavy-handed Spanish government is trying to trigger Catalonian independence.
  • Roads and Kingdoms considers the palm wine of Senegal, and its vendors.
  • Understanding Society considers the Holocaust, as an experience sociological and otherwise.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy makes a libertarian case for open borders.
  • Whatever’s John Scalzi celebrates his meeting mutual fan Alison Moyet.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how Belarus’ cautious Belarusianization is met by Russia’s pro-Soviet nostalgia.
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[NEWS] Five science and technology links: Darjeeling tea, Fitbits, cannabis, PrEP, Planet Nine

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  • Climate change is making the famous tea of Darjeeling much more difficult to come by. VICE reports.
  • Wired notes Fitbits are useful tracking devices for scientists engaged in studies, too. (I always wear mine.)
  • I entirely approve of this new Niagara College program. Why not legalize and professionalize cannabis agriculture?
  • This VICE interview with bringing the Truvada needed for inexpensive PrEP across the border into Canada is of note.
  • A new study suggests that Planet Nine, if it exists, was likely not captured by the young sun but formed here. Universe Today reports.

[NEWS] Four environment links: disasters, Tibetan soil flowing, lobsters, flooding

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  • Naomi Klein argues that this summer, of wildfires and disasters, marks an environmental turning point.
  • National Geographic shares stunning video of defrosting Tibetan soil flowing.
  • This dumping of illegally harvested lobsters as garbage on land in Nova Scotia is a terrible waste. CBC reports.
  • Can we limit urban flooding only if we force landowners to contribute to the costs of stormwater infrastructure? MacLean’s makes the case.

Written by Randy McDonald

September 19, 2017 at 10:45 pm

[URBAN NOTE] Five links: Toronto affordable housing, public art, Montréal flag, co-housing, Islands

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  • Building two thousand affordable housing units in Toronto is a nice step forward. Will there be more steps? The Toronto Star reports.
  • This charming bit of improvised art down at Humber Bay Park reminds me that I really need to head down there. From the Toronto Star.
  • Montréal has stopped representing genocidal General Amherst on its flag, replacing it with a native pine tree. The National Post reports.
  • Emily Macrae at Torontoist suggests co-housing, drawn from a Québec model, is something Toronto might want to look into.
  • Richard Longley at NOW Toronto explores the Toronto Islands. Do they have a future? What will they need?

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

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  • Centauri Dreams considers the idea of uploading a digital “Golden Record” into the memory of New Horizons.
  • Crooked Timber takes a look at American legal writer (and judge) Richard Posner’s embrace of pragmatism. What does it mean?
  • D-Brief notes the rapid melting of the glaciers that feed the major rivers of Asia.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to a paper considering ways to detect planets in orbit of red giants.
  • The LRB Blog considers the potential for political tumult in Saudi Arabia, in the wake of arrests and rumours.
  • The Map Room Blog links to a new gravity map of Mars, revealing the crust of that world to be less dense and more variable than thought.
  • The NYR Daily looks at the South China Sea dispute in the wake of Indonesia’s newly restated claims.
  • Roads and Kingdoms looks at Philadelphia’s seasonal cookie–spiced wafer–wars.
  • Drew Rowsome is a big fan of the movie adaptation of It.
  • Window on Eurasia suggests that, for want of better options, the Donbas republics’ people might return to Ukraine.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

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  • At Antipope, Charlie Stross considers the ways in which Big Data could enable an updated version of 1984.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait looks at all the ways in which this photo of galaxy NGC 5559 is cool, with a supernova and more.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly shares a week of her life as a professional writer.
  • Crooked Timber looks at the potentially dominant role of racism as a political marker in the US.
  • Far Outliers notes that the Confederacy’s military options circa 1864 were grim and limited.
  • Language Log shares an example of a Starbucks coffee cup with biscriptal writing from Shenyang.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes that the Rohingya are being subjected to genocide. What next?
  • Marginal Revolution notes the introduction of a new chocolate, ruby chocolate“.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw has it with ideological divisions of left and right.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer looks at the remarkably intemperate Spanish court decision that kicked off modern separatism in Catalonia.
  • Charley Ross looks at the sad story of missing teenager Brittanee Drexel.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes that now is an excellent time to start highlighting the politics of climate change.
  • Towleroad mourns New York City theatre star Michael Friedman.
  • Window on Eurasia notes the ways in which Russia is, and is not, likely to use the military.
  • Arnold Zwicky shares a map of the regional languages of France.

[NEWS] Five science and technology links: Chinese fields, Vancouver bananas, geothermal, space

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  • Bloomberg notes that the Chinese habit of wrapping farmers’ fields in plastic has long-term negative consequences.
  • It’s difficult not to trace the ability of a man in Vancouver to raise bananas at home to climate change. CBC reports.
  • The Caribbean island of Dominica is set to start to turn to geothermal power for its energy needs. The Inter Press Service reports.
  • Universe Today notes the astrometric data provided by GAIA lets us track stars set for close encounters.
  • The possible discovery of an intermediate-mass black hole very near the Galactic Centre is big in a lot of ways.