A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘global warming

[URBAN NOTE] Five notes about cities: Arctic, floating, cemeteries, wildlife, immigrants

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  • Wired noted how Arctic cities were facing significant problems from melting permafrost, and how they were trying to deal with this threat.
  • CityLab notes the ever-popular idea of a floating city, riding the waves.
  • Atlas Obscura notes, unsurprisingly, that some cemeteries in the United States were used as parks. Why not? These can be lovely green spaces. Just look at Toronto’s Mount Pleasant and Prospect cemeteries.
  • In a feature on Menno Schilthuizen’s Darwin Comes to Town, Simon Worrall at National Geographic looks at the many and varied ways wildlife can adapt to city life.
  • Melissa Byrnes, at Lawyers, Guns and Money, noted how Trump’s rhetoric of ICE “liberating” American communities echoed ways in which French authorities in the Algerian war militarized immigrant neighbourhoods.
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[ISL] Five PEI links: Heat wave, Mill River, theatre props, Black Islanders, Confederation Bridge

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  • CBC PEI reports on the intensity of the heat wave hitting PEI. Frankly, Ontario-like temperatures on the Island were always rare in the past.
  • A bid by indigenous groups on PEI to lay claim to the Mill River golf course on treaty grounds has been dismissed in court. Global News has it.
  • The sheer volume of props accumulated over time by the Confederation Centre of the Arts theatre is noteworthy, if perhaps unsurprising. CBC reports.
  • A black character, Sebastian Lacroix, is being introduced to the new Anne of Green Gables TV show. This is good: Anyone who read Black Islanders by Hornby must know about the black community in Charlottetown’s The Bog that, until now, was hidden. Global News reports.
  • Julie Payette reports that the Confederation Bridge linking the Island to the mainland is, in fact, visible from the International Space Station. CBC has it.

[URBAN NOTE] Five city links: Detroit, Metropolis, Seattle, Foster City, Kigali

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  • If ever I make it to Detroit, the John K King bookstore would surely be a must-visit. Atlas Obscura reports.
  • Metropolis, Illinois, is celebrating Superman. Where better to do so? Wired reports.
  • Seattle, like so many cities around North America, is apparently facing a gentrification that makes it increasingly uncomfortable for too many. Crosscut has it.
  • The San Francisco Bay area community of Foster City faces imminent danger from rising sea levels. CBC reports.
  • Decades after the horrors of the mid-1990s, dogs in the Rwandan capital of Kigali are starting to be treated as potential pets again. National Geographic reports.

[ISL[ Five islands links: Devil’s Island, Hainan, Hashima, Newfoundland, global warming floods

  • Business Insider shares some haunting photos of the old French prison island of Devil’s Island, in French Guiana, here.
  • China is authorizing a horse lottery for its tourist-heavy southern tropical island of Hainan. Bloomberg reports.
  • National Geographic shares photos of Japan’s Hashima Island, once a densely inhabited industrial conurbation and now at risk of succumbing entirely.
  • A fixed link between the island of Newfoundland and the Canadian mainland–more precisely, a rail link connecting the Northern Peninsula to a new route on the adjacent Labrador shore–may well be a viable proposal. CBC reports.
  • The worsening of wave-induced flooding on tropical islands might well make very many uninhabitable, by contaminating their water tables. National Geographic reports.

[ISL] Five Island links: Mi’kmaq UPEI, old-style boats, economic split, global warming, LGBTQ

  • CBC reports how the Mi’kmaq flag now flies high, and permanently, above the campus of UPEI. Well done!
  • An eastern PEI shipbuilder is creating an old-style wooden boat using traditional methods. CBC reports.
  • The division of PEI into two zones for employment insurance purposes, between greater Charlottetown and the rest of the Island, can be unfair to people in Charlottetown. It also reflects real economic divisions in the province. CBC reports.
  • When Atlantic Canada’s summers become as hot as Ontario’s thanks to global warming, I wonder what Ontario’s will be like? Global News reports.
  • A recent conference in Charlottetown featured long-standing Island activists Jim Culbert and Nola Etkin, explaining their queer lives in the province. The Guardian reports.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

  • Anthrodendum recommends design researcher Jan Chipchase’s Field Study Handbook for anthropologists interested in field practice.
  • Architectuul investigates strange similarities between buildings built in far-removed parts of the world.
  • Centauri Dreams takes a look at TESS, the next generation of exoplanet-hunting satellite.
  • Crooked Timber investigates the connections between the spiritualism of the 19th century and the fiction of the uncanny.
  • D-Brief notes the many names, often delightful, that newly-discovered locations on Mercury and Charon have received.
  • Cody Delistraty investigates two exhibitions of French satirists, including Charlie Hedo’s Georges Wolinski, to examine the nature of satire.
  • The Dragon’s Tales considers the possibility of cryomagna leaving marks on the surface of Europa.
  • Drew Ex Machina takes a look at the strangely alien skies of TRAPPIST-1e. What would its sun look like? How would the other planets appear?
  • The Everyday Sociology Blog takes a look at the new prominence of multigenerational households in the United States. While a response to economic strains, it also looks back to past traditions.
  • Hornet Stories notes how, on RuPaul’s Drag Race, Monet X Change gave a decent explanation behind the surprisingly recent birth of the modern British accent.
  • Imageo notes how a massive blob of warm water is rising to the surface of the Pacific.
  • At In A State of Migration, Lyman Stone explores the unique population history of Maine, to my eyes easily the most Atlantic Canadian of the fifty American states.
  • JSTOR Daily links to a paper exploring why modern video games can produce such rewarding experiences for players. (We can get meaning from many places.)
  • Language Log takes a look at the complexity of Chinese language classifications with a song by Yishi Band. What exactly is Yibin Sichuanese?
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money takes a look at an interesting question: When did Jews in the United States become white?
  • The LRB Blog takes a look at the baffling reasons behind the poisoning of the Skribins with Novichok, and the science behind it.
  • Marginal Revolution notes that this year, GDP per capita measured at PPP in Spain is higher than in Italy. (This probably says more about the disarray in Italy.)
  • The NYR Daily shares an interesting interview with cartoonist Art Spiegelman.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw tells of his experiences on a trip to the small Australian city of Armidale, in the region of New England.
  • Justin Petrone reflects on the tidy and clean, minimalist even, rural landscape of Estonia.
  • Progressive Download’s John Farrell notes brain scans that provide evidence of consciousness even in very young infants.
  • Drew Rowsome praises the Toronto production of the musical Fun Home, based on the Alison Bechdel graphic novel. I, for one, can’t wait to see it.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes that, although Proxima Centauri is far too active a star for Proxima Centauri b to be Earth-like, that world could still plausibly host life-supporting environments.
  • Ilya Somin at the Volokh Conspiracy suggests a recent deal at the federal level in the US between Trump and Cory Gardner has created space for states to legalize marijuana without fear of federal intervention.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

  • D-Brief notes that global climate change seems already to have altered the flow of the ocean current system including the Gulf Stream.
  • JSTOR Daily takes a look at the dialect, and cultural forms, of American loggers.
  • Taika Waititi, director of (among other movies) Thor: Ragnarok, has created controversy by talking about racism in his native New Zealand. (Good for him, I’d say.) Lawyers, Guns and Money reports.
  • Marginal Revolution takes a look at a strange public apology by a Chinese company, and what this says about Chinese politics.
  • Strange Maps’ Frank Jacobs shared this map depicting the many ephemeral states that appeared in the former Russian Empire after the October Revolution.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel makes the point that there are very good reasons to believe in dark matter and dark energy, that these concepts are not just a latter-day version of the aether.
  • Window on Eurasia looks at the many ways in which the Siberian republic of Tuva is a political anomaly in Russia.
  • At Worthwhile Canadian Initiative, Frances Woolley uses data from the National Graduates Survey to take a look at student regret in Canadian universities. To what extent does it exist? What disciplines is it concentrated in?