A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘globalization

[LINK] “World’s free trading nations could rally against Trump protectionism”

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CBC News’ Don Pittis warns that in a scenario where Donald Trump is likely to turn on Canada, Canada in turn must look to various partners and allies outside of North America in order to defend its interests.

The new anti-free-trade administration of Donald Trump hasn’t even taken over the White House and it appears incoming secretary of commerce Wilbur Ross is already preparing to send Canada a list of demands.

“NAFTA is logically the first thing for us to deal with,” Ross said yesterday when asked about his trade warning. “We ought to solidify relationships in the best way we can in our own territory before we go off to other jurisdictions.”

Besides the neo-imperialist reference to Canada and Mexico as “our own territory,” there is another reason to be wary.

It sounds as if the U.S. plan is a variation on the classic strategy of divide and conquer.

Only after sticking it to their “own territory” — in other words our territory — will the U.S. go on to make demands of more distant trade partners in Asia and Europe.

That might require Canada to step up and defend itself, including by looking for support from its free trading allies.

Written by Randy McDonald

January 20, 2017 at 6:00 pm

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

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  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly calls on journalists to stand up to Trump.
  • Centauri Dreams looks at exocomets.
  • Language Log shares an ad from the 1920s using the most vintage language imaginable.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money talks about globalization as a mechanism for concentrating wealth at the top of the elite.
  • The LRB Blog talks about the ghosts of the Cold War in the contemporary world.
  • Marginal Revolution’s Tyler Cowen argues that Germany has its own responsibility in transatlantic relations.
  • The New APPS Blog looks at the importance of administrative law.
  • The NYRB Daily celebrates John Berger.
  • Savage Minds proposes a read-in of Michel Foucault in protest of Trump’s inauguration on the 20th.
  • Towleroad reports on the latest statistics on the proportions of LGBT people in the United States.
  • Window on Eurasia looks at the continuing depopulation of the Russian Far East and examines the shift to indigenous naming practices in Kyrgyzstan.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

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  • Beyond the Beyond shares Voltaire’s critique of early globalization.
  • blogTO reports on how TTC streetcars are failing earlier than expected.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly talks about her trip to Philadelphia to see art.
  • Centauri Dreams talks about discovering streams of stars connecting the Sagittarius dwarf spheroidal galaxy to the Milky Way.
  • Crooked Timber talks about Donald Trump as a president with or without precedents.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze talks about the fate of exomoons in white dwarf systems.
  • The Everyday Sociology Blog takes a sociological perspective on fake news.
  • Language Log mourns the death of pinyin inventor Zhou Youguang.
  • The LRB Blog talks about the pleasures of incomprehension.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money talks about Vietnam as a maritime power.
  • Marginal Revolution notes that seasteading is set to have a go in French Polynesia.
  • Window on Eurasia argues Russia is too weak to keep a post-Soviet sphere of influence, and suggests Russia is set to be dominated by China and so needs a Western alliance.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

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  • ‘Apostrophen’s ‘Nathan Smith describes his writing projects for this year.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to a paper examining exomoon formation.
  • The LRB Blog worries about Trump’s hold on the button.
  • The NYRB Daily looks at Rex Tillerson, an oil company diplomat to autocrats.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw shares the rediscovered mid-19th century painting by Legros, L’Angelus.
  • Towleroad looks at the Russian tradition of kompromat, the gathering of compromising information for blackmail.
  • Transit Toronto notes that TTC surveying in Scarborough is beginning.
  • Understanding Society looks at path dependency in the formation of academic disciplines.
  • Window on Eurasia looks at Russian tensions regarding gastarbeiter migration and suggests Russia is set to actively sponsor separatism across the former Soviet Union.

[ISL] On PEI ranking among the best places to visit in the world, according to CNN

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CBC Prince Edward Island was among the news sources to note that Prince Edward Island was listed first in CNN’s list of the top places to go this year.

With Canada celebrating its 150th birthday in 2017, there’s no finer excuse to head to the birthplace of the nation, Prince Edward Island.

Travelers are falling in love with the island’s rocky red shores and picturesque fishing villages all over again thanks to several new TV and movie productions of the Lucy Maud Montgomery classic, “Anne of Green Gables.”

The best way to explore the island’s capital, Charlottetown, is on foot.

Many of the highlights are in the historic downtown core including the Charlottetown Province House — the famed government building where the Charlottetown Conference took place in 1864. It was here that a small group of elected officials gathered to discuss the possibility of joining the region’s independent provinces to create a singular nation.

Three years later, Canada’s Constitution Act was passed by British Parliament and a new country was born.
Upscale restaurants have multiplied on the island in the last 10 years, taking advantage of the excellent local produce.

But there’s nothing quite like an old fashioned lobster supper — a massive gathering traditionally held in a cavernous community hall that ends with a table full of empty shells and butter-coated fingers.

Note that it did not rank #1, but instead was just the first entry. This is a distinction, I think, some people have passed over.

Written by Randy McDonald

January 11, 2017 at 10:15 pm

[LINK] “Inside Quebec’s far right: Radical groups push extreme message”

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CBC News’ Jonathan Montpetit writes about how the position of Québec as a place where North American and European influences meet, normally a positive thing, has recently allowed far-right activists of these two traditions to meet and mingle.

On a sunny day in mid-October, about 100 people gathered outside Quebec’s National Assembly, chanting their concern that immigration was eroding Quebec culture.

They were members of the various groups that make up the far right in Quebec: Justiciers du peuple, PEGIDA Quebec and Soldats d’Odin among them.

Standing apart from the crowd that Saturday were a dozen members of a group that even the rest of the far right finds radical.

Scaling the nearby walls of the Citadelle, Atalante Québec unfurled a banner that read, “Death to terrorists, Islam Out.”

“Atalante are guys that are a bit more extreme than us,” said Katy Latulippe, who heads the Quebec chapter of Soldiers of Odin, a group that has proposed patrolling Quebec City neighbourhoods popular with Muslims.

Other far-right groups avoid talking about race, preferring to speak of religious fundamentalism instead.

Written by Randy McDonald

January 9, 2017 at 10:00 pm

[BLOG] Some Friday links

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  • blogTO notes that TTC tunnels will get WiFi in 2018.
  • Border Thinking’s Laura Augustín shares some of Edvard Munch’s brothel paintings.
  • Centauri Dreams looks at the latest science on fast radio bursts.
  • Dangerous Minds shares some of the sexy covers of Yugoslavian computer magazine Računari.
  • Dead Things looks at the latest research into dinosaur eggs.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to a paper suggesting that a high surface magnetic field in a red giant star indicates a recent swallowing of a planet.
  • Language Log shares an ad for a portable smog mask from China.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money takes issue with the idea of NAFTA being of general benefit to Mexico.
  • Torontoist looks at the history of Toronto General Hospital.
  • Window on Eurasia is skeptical about an American proposal for Ukraine, and suggests Ossetian reunification within Russia is the next annexation likely to be made by Russia.