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Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘globalization

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

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  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes the Elon Musk proposal to terraform Mars by dropping nuclear weapons on the planet’s ice caps is a bad idea.
  • James Bow writes about how the introduction of faeries saved his novel The Night Girl.
  • Centauri Dreams looks at the storms of Jupiter.
  • The Crux explains the mystery of a village in Poland that has not seen the birth of a baby boy for nearly a decade.
  • D-Brief looks at the exoplanets of nearby red dwarf Gliese 1061.
  • Cody Delisraty talks of Renaissance painter Fra Angelico.
  • Drew Ex Machina commemorates the 30th anniversary of the Voyager 2 flyby of Neptune.
  • The Dragon’s Tales shares links to some papers about the Paleolithic.
  • JSTOR Daily hosts an essay by Viktor Mayer-Schönberger suggesting that Internet rot might be good since it could let people start to forget the past and so move on.
  • Language Hat questions whether the phrase “free to all” has really fallen out of use.
  • Language Log takes a look about immigration to the United States and Emma Lazarus’ famous poem.
  • Dan Nexon at Lawyers, Guns and Money takes issue with the suggestion of, among other, Henry Farrell, that we are headed away from globalization towards fortress economies. Redundancy, he suggests, will be more important.
  • Marginal Revolution links to a disturbing paper suggesting users of opioids use them in part for social reasons.
  • The NYR Daily features an exchange on a new law in Singapore seeking to govern fake news.
  • The Power and the Money features a guest post from Leticia Arroyo Abad looking at Argentina before the elections.
  • Drew Rowsome takes a look at a new play by Raymond Helkio examining the life of out boxer Mark Leduc.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel considers if we can test gravitational waves for wave-particle duality.
  • Arnold Zwicky shares photos of the many flowers of Gamble Garden, in Palo Alto.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

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  • Architectuul notes a bike tour of Bauhaus architecture in Berlin.
  • Bad Astronomy Phil Plait notes the discovery of Beta Pictoris c, a second super-Jovian planet in that young system.
  • Centauri Dreams notes that the NASA Europa Clipper is moving ahead.
  • Crooked Timber shares a gorgeous night photo of San Giorgio Maggiore, in Venice.
  • The Crux notes what we are learning about the Denisovans.
  • D-Brief notes that Neanderthals were prone to swimmer’s ear.
  • Dangerous Minds looks at some of the pop culture likes of Karl Marx.
  • Drew Ex Machina’s Andrew LePage looks at the exoplanets of GJ 1061.
  • Earther notes how Icelanders mourned the loss of a glacier in a ceremony.
  • Whitney Kimball at Gizmodo looks at what the mass data loss of more than a decade’s worth of music at Myspace means for our Internet era.
  • Imageo shares photos of spiraling cloud formations photographed at night from space.
  • Ian Humberstone at The Island Review writes about his witnessing of the bonxies, birds of the Shetlands.
  • Joe. My. God. notes a report suggesting Trump joked about swapping Greenland for Puerto Rico.
  • JSTOR Daily notes how the rhythmic dancing of the Shakers in 18th century America marked that sect as different.
  • Language Hat considers the humour of some philosophers.
  • Language Log notes the oblique commentaries of Hong Kong tycoon Li Ka-shing on his city-state’s protests.
  • Erik Loomis at Lawyers, Guns and Money notes the idiocy of the Trump fetish for Greenland.
  • The Map Room Blog notes how astronomers have mapped the Local Void, of deep intergalactic space.
  • Marginal Revolution wonders if the future of Venice might be found in its becoming a Chinese portal into Europe.
  • Sean Marshall notes how the Ford government is undermining conservation in Ontario.
  • The NYR Daily shares some of the New York City photography of Phil Penman.
  • Starts With A Bang’s notes the immense storms of Saturn.
  • Strange Company shares a weekend collection of links.
  • Window on Eurasia looks at how Belarus plans on reorganizing its internal structures to try to minimize rural depopulation.
  • Nick Rowe at Worthwhile Canadian Initiative talks about monetary policy in metaphors.
  • Arnold Zwicky looks at some penguins from around the world.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

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  • Bad Astronomy’s Phil Plait looks at the strange galaxy NGC 5866.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly looks at some of her prep work when she covers a news story.
  • Centauri Dreams considers the idea of using the Earth itself for gravitational lensing.
  • D-Brief notes a newly-discovered fossil parrot from New Zealand, a bird nearly one metre in size.
  • Far Outliers looks at the values of cowrie shells in 19th century central Africa. What could they buy?
  • Gizmodo notes the limited circumstances in which IMDb will allow transgender people to remove their birth names from their records.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at the abortive American state of Franklin.
  • Language Hat notes a 19th century Russian exile’s experience with the differences between Norwegian and Swedish.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes, after Epstein, the incompetence that too often characterizes American prisons.
  • Marginal Revolution notes the importance of slavery in the history of Venice.
  • The NYR Daily notes how W.H. Auden was decidedly unimpressed by the Apollo moon landing, and why.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes the import of astronomers’ discovery of an ancient early black hole.
  • Strange Maps’ Frank Jacobs shares a vertical world map from China.
  • Understanding Society’s Daniel Little considers how competent the Nuclear Regulatory Commission actually is.
  • Window on Eurasia looks at the internal divides of Russia.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

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  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes that the galaxy’s stores of star-forming gas are running low, here.
  • Centauri Dreams notes the next generation of gravitational wave detectors could detect exoplanets, massive worlds orbiting binary white dwarfs.
  • The Crux reports on what is known about Homo naledi.
  • Karen Sternheimer at the Everyday Sociology Blog takes a look at the risks of social isolation.
  • Far Outliers reports on three enclaves of Arab culture encountered by early Western explorers in 19th century East Africa.
  • Gizmodo notes the steady progress made by LightSail 2 in its travel around the world.
  • The Island Review shares the Phillip Miller poem “Biennale”, inspired by Venice.
  • Marginal Revolution looks at how the Norwegian Arctic island of Svalbard works without border controls.
  • The NYR Daily notes that while America is not Rome, it thinks it is.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel explains some oddities of Higgs bosons.
  • Understanding Society’s Daniel Little looks at how the Kyshtym nuclear disaster occurred.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that 5% of Russian Orthodox parishes in Ukraine have defected so far to the Ukrainian church.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell applies information and management theory to Brexit.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

  • Bad Astronomy’s Phil Plait looks at the extreme millisecond pulsar IGR J17062−6143.
  • Centauri Dreams looks at a proposal to intercept objects of extrasolar origin like ‘Oumuamua.
  • The Crux looks at how researchers are discovering traces of lost hominid populations in the DNA of contemporary humans.
  • D-Brief notes a crowdsourcing of a search for intermediate-mass black holes.
  • Gizmodo notes the impending production of a new working Commodore 64 clone.
  • The Island Review notes people of the Norway island of Sommarøy wish to make their island, home to the midnight sun, a #TimeFreeZone.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at the art that has been produced in the era of digital addiction.
  • Language Log looks at how, in Iran, the word “Eastoxification” has entered into usage alongside the older “Westoxification.”
  • Dave Brockington at Lawyers, Guns, and Money looks at the many likely failings of a Corbyn foreign policy for the United Kingdom.
  • The LRB Blog notes that opposition candidate Ekrem İmamoğlu has been re-elected as mayor of Istanbul.
  • The Map Room Blog links to various maps of the Moon.
  • Marginal Revolution links to a paper looking at markets in Lagos, suggesting they are self-regulating to some degree.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel explains when the earliest sunrise and latest sunset of the year is, and why.
  • Towleroad shares an interview with Jack Baker and Mike McConnell, a same-sex couple married for nearly a half-century.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how the open approach of the Russian Federation to Russian diasporids is not extended to diasporas of its minority groups, particularly to Muslim ones like Circassians and Tatars.
  • Arnold Zwicky considers some Pride fashion, with and without rainbows.

[URBAN NOTE] Five city links: Hamilton, Québec City, San Jose, Tehran, Hong Kong

  • Real estate in Hamilton, Ontario, is quite affordable by GTA standards. Global News reports.
  • Québec City has a new farmer’s market to replace an old. CBC reports.
  • San Jose, California, is set to embark on a grand experiment in cohousing, CityLab reports.
  • These vast abandoned apartment blocks in the desert outside of Tehran speak of economic underperformance, to say the least. Messynessychic has it.
  • Now that Hong Kong has not just competition from other cities in China but is finding itself outmatched by the likes of Shenzhen and Shanghai, the city-state’s bargaining power is accordingly limited. The SCMP reports.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

  • Bad Astronomy’s Phil Plait looks at Abell 30, a star that has been reborn in the long process of dying.
  • Centauri Dreams uses the impending launch of LightSail 2 to discuss solar sails in science fiction.
  • John Quiggin at Crooked Timber, as part of a series of the fragility of globalization, considers if migration flows can be reversed. (He concludes it unlikely.)
  • The Crux considers if the record rain in the Midwest (Ontario, too, I would add) is a consequence of climate change.
  • D-Brief notes that the failure of people around the world to eat enough fruits and vegetables may be responsible for millions of premature dead.
  • Dangerous Minds introduces readers to gender-bending Italian music superstar Renato Zero.
  • Dead Things notes how genetic examinations have revealed the antiquity of many grapevines still used for wine.
  • Gizmodo notes that the ocean beneath the icy crust of Europa may contain simple salt.
  • io9 tries to determine the nature of the many twisted timelines of the X-Men movie universe of Fox.
  • JSTOR Daily observes that the Stonewall Riots were hardly the beginning of the gay rights movement in the US.
  • Language Log looks at the mixed scripts on a bookstore sign in Beijing.
  • Dave Brockington at Lawyers, Guns, and Money argues that Jeremy Corbyn has a very strong hold on his loyal followers, perhaps even to the point of irrationality.
  • Marginal Revolution observes that people who create public genetic profiles for themselves also undo privacy for their entire biological family.
  • Sean Marshall at Marshall’s Musings shares a photo of a very high-numbered street address, 986039 Oxford-Perth Road in Punkeydoodle’s Corners.
  • The NYR Daily examines the origins of the wealth of Lehman Brothers in the exploitation of slavery.
  • The Planetary Society Blog shares a panorama-style photo of the Apollo 11 Little West Crater on the Moon.
  • Drew Rowsome notes that classic documentary Paris Is Burning has gotten a makeover and is now playing at TIFF.
  • Peter Rukavina, writing from a trip to Halifax, notes the convenience of the Eduroam procedures allowing users of one Maritime university computer network to log onto another member university’s network.
  • Dylan Reid at Spacing considers how municipal self-government might be best embedded in the constitution of Canada.
  • The Speed River Journal’s Van Waffle pays tribute to the wildflower Speedwell, a name he remembers from Watership Down.
  • Strange Maps shares a crowdsourced map depicting which areas of Europe are best (and worst) for hitchhikers.
  • Window on Eurasia notes the distribution of native speakers of Russian, with Israel emerging as more Russophone than some post-Soviet states.