A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘graphic novels

[URBAN NOTE] Ten Toronto links: politics, transit, pop culture, photos

  • CBC Toronto bids farewell, fittingly at TCAF time, to the iconic Jason Loo Toronto comic series The Pitiful Human-Lizard.
  • At blogTO, Tanya Mok reports on the resistance of tenants at 54-56 Kensington Avenue to an illegal eviction order by their landlord.
  • The Toronto Star reports</u. on a new matchmaking event intended to connect future roommates to each other.
  • Kevin Ritchie at NOW Toronto reports on how a new pricing scheme for the AGO, including a $35 annual pass for people over 25, reflects a push to try to get more people into museums.
  • Glenn Sumi writes at NOW Toronto about the increasingly steep price of ticket prices for live theatre in Toronto.
  • Toronto Life shares photos from an exhibit, by Patrick Cummins and Ivaan Kotulsky, of Queen Street West in the 1980s and 1990s.
  • Richard Longley writes at NOW Toronto about the emptying of an old warehouse of collectibles and oddities on Wabush, part of the decline of old storied Toronto.
  • Toronto Life shares more photos from outdoor market Stackt, at Front and Bathurst.
  • Steve Munro starts to analyse traffic patterns on the 501 Queen streetcar, looking first at the Neville Loop end.
  • NOW Toronto is one of a few news sources to report on Scarborough writer Téa Mutonji and her new short story collection Shut Up, You’re Pretty.

[BLOG] Some Monday blog links

  • Crooked Timber at John Quiggin takes issue with the idea that, now, there are many Republicans who accept Trump only conditionally, for what a Trump presidency could achieve.
  • D-Brief notes the XT2 signal, issue of a collision between two magnetars in a galaxy 6.6 billion light-years away.
  • Cody Delistraty reports on an exhibit at the Institut du monde arabe in Paris on the history of soccer in world politics.
  • Earther reports on a new satellite mission focused on studying solar-induced fluorescence, the glow of plants as they photosynthesize.
  • Far Outliers notes how U.S. Grant responded to slaves seeking freedom from the Union Army.
  • JSTOR Daily explores Lake Baikal.
  • Language Log reports on the multilingualism of Pete Buttigieg.
  • Abigail Nussbaum at Lawyers, Guns and Money gives deserved praise to the Jason Lutes graphic novel Berlin.
  • Marginal Revolution looks at the ways in which dense social networks can keep stroke victims from getting quick help.
  • The NYR Daily looks at the campaigns and ideas of anti-authoritarian Chinese professor and writer Xu Zhangrun.
  • Drew Rowsome gives a largely negative review to the 2014 Easter horror film The Beaster Bunny.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel explains why the singularities of black holes have spin.
  • Window on Eurasia notes on the report of a Muslim community leader in Norilsk that a quarter of the population of that Russian Arctic city is of Muslim background.
  • Arnold Zwicky considers the ways in which flowers and penguins and cuteness can interact, with photos.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

  • Architectuul features a photo essay made by Evan Panagopoulos in the course of a hurried three-hour visit to the Socialist Modernist and modern highlights of 20th century Kiev architecture.
  • Bad Astrronomer Phil Plait notes how the latest planet found in the Kepler-47 circumbinary system evokes Tatooine.
  • Centauri Dreams looks at tide and radiation, and their impacts on potential habitability, in the TRAPPIST-1 system.
  • Citizen Science Salon looks at how the TV show Cyberchase can help get young people interested in science and math.
  • Crooked Timber mourns historian David Brion Davis.
  • The Crux looks at how the HMS Challenger pioneered the study of the deeps of the oceans, with that ship’s survey of the Mariana Trench.
  • D-Brief looks at how a snowball chamber using supercooled water can be used to hunt for dark matter.
  • Earther shares photos of the heartbreaking and artificial devastation of the Amazonian rainforest of Brazil.
  • Gizmodo shares a beautiful Hubble photograph of the southern Crab Nebula.
  • Information is Beautiful shares a reworked version of the Julia Galef illustration of the San Francisco area meme space.
  • io9 notes that, fresh from being Thor, Jane Foster is set to become a Valkyrie in a new comic.
  • JSTOR Daily explains the Victorian fondness for leeches, in medicine and in popular culture.
  • Language Hat links to an interview with linguist Amina Mettouchi, a specialist in Berber languages.
  • Language Log shares the report of a one-time Jewish refugee on changing language use in Shanghai, in the 1940s and now.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money reports on the horror of self-appointed militias capturing supposed undocumented migrants in the southwestern US.
  • Marginal Revolution reports on the circumstances in which volunteer militaries can outperform conscript militaries.
  • At the NYR Daily, Christopher Benfey reports on the surprisingly intense connection between bees and mourning.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw, responding to Israel Folau, considers free expression and employment.
  • The Planetary Society Blog shares a guest post from Barney Magrath on the surprisingly cheap adaptations needed to make an iPhone suitable for astrophotography.
  • Peter Rukavina reports on the hotly-contested PEI provincial election of 1966.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel explains what the discovery of helium hydride actually means.
  • Understanding Society’s Daniel Little praises the Jill Lepore US history These Truths for its comprehensiveness.
  • Window on Eurasia reports on the growing divergences in demographics between different post-Soviet countries.
  • Arnold Zwicky starts with another Peeps creation and moves on from there.

[ISL] Five #PEI links: PEI Greens, orchids, Sandstone Comics, PrEP, David Currie

  • The Guardian reports on the confidence of PEI Green Party leader Peter Bevan-Baker that the April election on PEI is for his party to win.
  • This guide to the wild orchids of PEI sounds very useful. CBC reports.
  • I wish the team at PEI comics group Sandstone Comics the best as they prepare their issues of original material. CBC reports.
  • The costs of anti-HIV drug regimen PrEP are now being covered on PEI for members of at-risk groups. CBC reports.
  • The Guardian features an interview with 80-year-old Charlottetown cobbler David Currie about his life and his career six decades long.

[URBAN NOTE] Six Toronto links: Downsview Park, Christie Pits, Queen Video, public art, Joanna Luo

  • A formal inquest into the stage collapse that killed one person at a Radiohead concert at Downsview Park in 2012 is only now taking off. CBC reports.
  • The May opening of a new exhibit of Robert Mapplethorpe’s work at the Olga Korper Gallery, reported by NOW Toronto, is very exciting.
  • blogTO notes a new graphic novel to be put out by Dirty Water Comics dealing with the anti-Semitic Christie Pits Riot of 1933.
  • Queen Video’s last location, in the Annex, is finally closing, with plenty of its titles now available to be bought before it shutters its doors at the end of April. Global News reports.
  • NOW Toronto reports on Museum II, a show part of the Myseum Intersections Festival looking at the impact of war and trauma on spaces.
  • Karon Liu, writing at the Toronto Star, explores with WeChat influencer Joanna Luo a whole universe of Chinese restaurants and social networking that was almost unknown to many Torontonians like myself.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

  • Centauri Dreams considers what would be needed, and what would be the use, of a SETI search of Earth’s co-orbitals.
  • John Quiggin at Crooked Timber considers the idea of nature potentially having legal rights in the context of corporations, likewise, actually having such.
  • D-Brief reports that the Mars 2020 probe will bring with it a mini-probe built around a helicopter.
  • io9 notes that writer Jonathan Hickman will be coming back to Marvel to write two new X-Men books this summer.
  • Joe. My. God. notes that a Trump supporter recently arrested for a Mafia slaying had earlier tried to conduct citizen’s arrests of prominent Democrats.
  • Language Hat takes a look at obscenities in Russian that do not quite make it over to English.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money reacts to the massive anti-Brexit protests in the United Kingdom this past weekend.
  • Marginal Revolution discusses just how bad a Brexit is likely to be, or not.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel explains why LIGO and like instruments have not detected gravitational wave sources within our galaxy. (Briefly, they aren’t good enough yet to pick up faint sources.)
  • The Volokh Conspiracy notes that not much new has come from the release of the Mueller investigation summary.
  • Arnold Zwicky builds from a report of a new LGBTQ consumer advocate from Florida, Nik Harris.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

  • Architectuul reports on its Forgotten Masterpieces campaign, aiming to promote overlooked and endangered works of 20th century architecture.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait reports on how the mass of the Milky Way Galaxy has just now been calculated at 1.54 trillion solar masses.
  • blogTO reports that three thousand students at the University of Toronto apparently fund their education through sugar daddies.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly writes about how she found a new tribe at a journalism conference.
  • Centauri Dreams notes that black hole starship engines count as a detectable technosignature for SETI searches.
  • John Holbo at Crooked Timber considers the emotionalism of Peterson and Shapiro versus facts in the light of Plato.
  • The Crux notes how, before settling the Moon, we have to first develop the techniques necessary for mining the Moon.
  • D-Brief notes the threats posed by humanity to the ecosystems of Antarctica.
  • Bruce Dorminey notes a proposal before NASA to dispatch a smallsat probe to asteroid Pallas.
  • Andrew LePage at Drew Ex Machina takes a look at the first test flights, in the 1960s, of the reusable space plane the X-15.
  • Far Outliers looks at the separation of Muslims from Hindus in Calcutta, and the subordination of the former to the latter.
  • Gizmodo reports on an exciting new display of the Tyrannosaurus Rex at the American Museum of Natural History that features, finally, feathers.
  • Keiran Healy crunches the numbers to notes how the hierarchy of academic institutions in the United States has scarcely changed over the previous century.
  • Joe. My. God. notes that the 1971 marriage in Minnesota of Michael McConnell and Jack Baker has been officially recognized.
  • JSTOR Daily takes a look at the overlooked radical politics of Frida Kahlo.
  • Language Hat looks at the mysterious choice in names for the pre-Columbian Adena culture of North America. Why “Adena”?
  • At Language Log, Victor Mair shares a post by a Chinese father who calls for a liberation of Chinese languages from their traditional script.
  • Steve Attewell writes at Lawyers, Guns and Money about the history of the Marvel Universe’s Hellfire Club, memorably created by Chris Claremont.
  • Marginal Revolution shares a paper supporting the thesis of Jared Diamond about the importance of the axes of continents in explaining biological and cultural diffusion.
  • The New APPS Blog reports on the complicated trajectory from Marx to Foucault.
  • Rachel Aspden writes at the NYR Daily about the political economy of safari tours.
  • Casey Dreier at the Planetary Society Blog notes a fiscal year 2020 proposal before NASA for a sample return mission to Mars.
  • The Russian Demographics Blog notes that the Global Data Lab has just had a paper published in Nature on their database of subnational entities’ rankings on the Human Development Index.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel argues that the new Trump budget for FY2020 would cause terrible damage to NASA.
  • Window on Eurasia suggests that the Putin government’s policies are driving more rural-to-urban migration in Russia.
  • Frances Woolley writes at Worthwhile Canad8ian Initiative about the relationship, under the Ford government of Ontario, of age limits for professors with tenure.
  • Arnold Zwicky considers the lovely clematis.