A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘green party

[NEWS] Ten #cdnpoli links

  • CBC looks at the internal splits within British Columbia, between the Liberal-leaning coast and the Alberta-leaning interior, here.
  • The legal departure of oil company EnCana from its Alberta headquarters is the cause of great upset. CBC reports.
  • Will Andrew Scheer survive as leader of the Conservative Party, with challengers like Peter MacKay? The National Observer reports.
  • People in Lloydminister, on the Alberta-Saskatchewan border, reflect the frustrations of the populations of the two provinces. CBC reports.
  • Philippe Fournier at MacLean’s writes about the sharp rural-urban political split in Canada.
  • Green Party Fredericton MP Jenica Atwin is interviewed by the National Observer about her goals, here.
  • The Treaty 8 chiefs have united in opposition to the separation of Alberta and Saskatchewan. Global News reports.
  • CBC reported on the multiple MP candidates who, genealogist Darryl Leroux found, falsely claimed indigenous ancestry.
  • Jessica Deer reported for CBC about the near-universal boycott by the Haudenosaunee of #elxn43, and the reasons for this boycott.
  • Scott Gilmore recently a href=”https://www.macleans.ca/opinion/the-u-s-is-sinking-maybe-its-time-for-canada-to-jump-ship/”>suggested at MacLean’s that, noting American instability, Canada might do well to secure itself and promote its multilateralism by seeking to join the EU.

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[NEWS] Eighteen #cdnpoli and #exln43 links

  • MacLean’s looks at how Justin Trudeau and the Liberals survived #elxn43, here.
  • Ajay Parasram at The Conversation looks at the new complications faced by Justin Trudeau.
  • Daily Xtra looks at the record of the Liberals on LGBTQ2 issues, here.
  • Daily Xtra looks at the four out LGBTQ2 MPs elected to Parliament, here.
  • Philippe Fournier at MacLean’s argues that 338Canada stands vindicated in its predictions, with some 90% of the people it predicted would be elected being elected.
  • What will become of Conservative leader Andrew Scheer? The National Post considers.
  • Strategic voting and Doug Ford, Mark Gollom notes, kept the Conservatives from making a breakthrough in Ontario.
  • Robyn Urback at CBC notes that the narrow conservatism of Scheer kept the Conservatives from victory in a wary Canada.
  • Stephen Maher at MacLean’s questions if the Bloc Québécois victory has much to do with separatism, per se.
  • Voters in Québec seem to be fine with election results, with a strong Bloc presence to keep the Liberals on notice. CBC has it.
  • Talk of separatism has taken off in Alberta following the #elxn43 results. Global News has it.
  • The premier of Saskatchewan has also talked of his province’s alienation after #elxn43, here in the National Post.
  • CBC’s As It Happens carries an interview with former Conservative MP Jay Hill, now an advocate for western Canadian separatism.
  • Atlantic Canada may provide new members for the cabinet of Justin Trudeau. The Toronto Star reports.
  • Jaime Battiste, Liberal, has been elected as the first Mi’kmaq MP from Nova Scotia. Global News has it.
  • The Green Party did not make its hoped-for breakthrough on Vancouver Island, but it will struggle on. Global News has it.
  • Did, as Politico suggested, Canada sleepwalk into the future with #elxn43?
  • We should be glad, Scott Gilmore argues in MacLean’s, that given the global challenges to democracy #elxn43 in Canada was relatively boring.

[NEWS] 15 links about Canada and Canadian politics (#cdnpoli)

  • Scott Gilmore at MacLean’s notes how, in the United States, Canada as a model is a common idea among Democrats.
  • David Camfield argues at The Conversation that the 1919 Winnipeg General Strike offers lessons for Canadians now.
  • Le Devoir notes the recent argument of now-Québec premier François Legault that a Québec that was, like Ontario, a relatively wealthy province would be a Québec that would have fewer tensions with the rest of Canada. Is this plausible?
  • Éric Grenier notes at CBC that, in Ontario, Andrew Scheer’s federal conservatives will need to draw voters from beyond Ford Nation.
  • MacLean’s hosts the arguments of Frank Graves and Michael Valpy that Canadian politicians are not paying nearly the amount of attention to economic inequality that Canadians think they should.
  • MacLean’s makes the point that Conrad Black seems to see much to like in Donald Trump.
  • Ontario and the Canadian government are fighting over funding for the proposed Ontario Line, the Canadian government insisting it needs more information about the route. The Toronto Star reports.
  • Facebook, it turns out, chose not to pay proper attention to sending officials to testify at a Canada government inquiry into fake news. Maclean’s reports.
  • Justin Trudeau, speaking recently in Toronto, credited immigration for the success of the tech sector of Canada. CBC reports.
  • Foreign workers turn out to play a critical role in staffing the lobster plants in the Acadian fishing village of Meteghan, in Nova Scotia. CBC reports.
  • Canada and the United States are again disputing the claims of Canada to sovereignty over the Northwest Passage. Global News reports.
  • MacLean’s interviews Northwest Territories premier Bob McLeod, who dreams of a massive development of Arctic Canada, including a goal of a million residents for his territory.
  • Enzo DiMatteo suggests at NOW Toronto that the growing unpopularity of Doing Ford in Ontario might hurt the federal Conservatives badly.
  • Could the Green Party go mainstream across Canada? The Conversation considers.
  • The Conversation reports on what the national fervour over the Toronto Raptors represents, including the growing diversity of the population of Canada and the global spread of basketball.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

  • Ingrid Robeyns at Crooked Timber takes us from her son’s accidental cut to the electronic music of Røbic.
  • D-Brief explains what the exceptional unexpected brightness of the first galaxies reveals about the universe.
  • Far Outliers looks at how President Grant tried to deal with the Ku Klux Klan.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at the surprising influence of the Turkish harem on the fashion, at least, of Western women.
  • This Kotaku essay arguing that no one should be sitting on the Iron Throne makes even better sense to me now.
  • Language Hat looks at the particular forms of French spoken by the famously Francophile Russian elites of the 19th century.
  • Scott Lemieux at Lawyers, Guns and Money notes how teaching people to code did not save the residents of an Appalachia community.
  • Marginal Revolution notes how, in the early 19th century, the young United States trading extensively with the Caribbean, even with independent Haiti.
  • At the NYR Daily, Colm Tóibín looks at the paintings of Pat Steir.
  • Peter Rukavina writes about how he has been inspired by the deaths of the Underhays to become more active in local politics.
  • Daniel Little at Understanding Society shares his research goals from 1976.
  • Window on Eurasia notes the conflicts between the Russian Orthodox Church and some Russian nationalists over the latter’s praise of Stalin.
  • Arnold Zwicky looks at dragons in history, queer and otherwise.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

  • Architectuul writes</u about the pioneering women architects of the United Kingdom.
  • Bad Astronomy reports on a marvelous mosaic assembled by amateur astronomers of the Large Magellanic Cloud.
  • Caitlin Kelly at the Broadside Blog notes how college debts in the United States hinder social mobility.
  • The Crux considers how the antibiotic-resistant fungus C. auris can be treated.
  • D-Brief looks at the archaeological studies of graves in the forest islands of Bolivia that have revealed remarkable things about the settlement of ancient Amazonia.
  • Far Outliers looks at how U.S. Grant built a pontoon bridge across the James River in Virginia.
  • Gizmodo notes the big crater created by Hayabusa 2 in the surface of Ryugu, suggesting that body’s loose composition.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at how the plan of Denmark to build a border fence to protect its pig populations against wild boars might be flawed.
  • Language Hat looks at the South Arabian languages, non-Arabic Semitic languages spoken in the south of the Arabian peninsula.
  • Erik Loomis at Lawyers, Guns and Money looks at the growing role of women in the American labour movement.
  • James Butler at the LRB Blog writes about the new urgency of the Extinction Rebellion in this era of climate change and threatened apocalypse.
  • Marginal Revolution considers a paper claiming that intergenerational social mobility in much of Canada is no higher than in most of the neighbouring United States.
  • The NYR Daily examines the democracy of Indonesia.
  • Noel Maurer at The Power and the Money looks at how a particular reading of international law was used in Bolivia to justify a violation of the national constitution.
  • Peter Rukavina shares an insightful map looking at the election results from PEI. One thing brought out by the map is the strength of the Greens across the Island.
  • The Speed River Journal’s Van Waffle looks at the useful Ontario shrub of leatherwood.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes the discovery of carbon-60 buckyballs in the far reaches of our galaxy by Hubble.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy notes that the president and the prime minister of Ukraine are both Jews.
  • Towleroad notes the new video by Willie Tay, a Singapore music star who was dropped by his label for being gay and has responded by coming out and releasing a video for his song “Open Up Babe”.
  • Window on Eurasia looks at the Ingermanlanders, also known as Ingrians or Ingrian Finns, a Finnic people in the hinterland of St. Petersburg who suffered horrifically under Communism.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell looks at how computers, originally imagined to function in certain specific ways, are being reimagined and reused in ways which do not quite suit them (and us).
  • Arnold Zwicky finds a stock photo used to represent art stolen by the Nazis and uses it to explore issues of recovery and loss and mistake.

[ISL] Five #PEI links: PEI Greens, orchids, Sandstone Comics, PrEP, David Currie

  • The Guardian reports on the confidence of PEI Green Party leader Peter Bevan-Baker that the April election on PEI is for his party to win.
  • This guide to the wild orchids of PEI sounds very useful. CBC reports.
  • I wish the team at PEI comics group Sandstone Comics the best as they prepare their issues of original material. CBC reports.
  • The costs of anti-HIV drug regimen PrEP are now being covered on PEI for members of at-risk groups. CBC reports.
  • The Guardian features an interview with 80-year-old Charlottetown cobbler David Currie about his life and his career six decades long.

[NEWS] Five Canadian politics links: marijuana, NDP, Québec, Green Party, ISIS, Brexit and film

  • There is a shortlist of likely marijuana store locations in Ontario that includes Yorkville in Toronto. Global News reports.
  • Éric Grenier at CBC reports that the NDP in Québec risks falling to pre-Orange Wave levels of support.
  • Former NDP leader Thomas Mulcair warns that the weakening of the NDP stance on environmental issues might led to mass defections to the Green Party. CTV has it.
  • Given the lack of any legal obligation to expedite the return of ISIS fighters holding Canadian citizenship, the Canadian government seems inclined to let them remain in detention in former ISIS territories. Global News reports.
  • Brexit is boosting the Canadian film industry, given our numerous advantages as described by the Hollywood Reporter.