A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘health

[NEWS] Five science links: cocoliztli in Mexico, English forest, geothermal and tidal, space science

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  • National Geographic notes a new study suggesting that a salmonella variant was substantially responsible for a mysterious plague, cocoliztli, that depopulated 16th century Mexico.
  • Wired reports on a worthy attempt at environmental engineering in the United Kingdom, an attempt to build a coast-to-coast forest in northern England.
  • National Observer notes that the government of Canada is preparing funding for higher-risk clean power technologies including geothermal and tidal energy.
  • Universe Today’s Matt Williams notes a new study, drawing from LIGO data, determining that at their most massive non-rotating neutron stars can only have 2.16 solar masses.
  • Matt Williams at Universe Today observes the detection of a stellar-mass black hole candidate in the heart of globular cluster NGC 3201. It’s not an intermediate-mass black hole, but it’s something!
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[BLOG] Some Saturday links

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  • The Big Picture shares adorable photos of baby animals.
  • Multi-planet system K2-138 is one of the systems found via crowdsourcing, Centauri Dreams notes.
  • I did not know that David Bowie and Brian Eno visited the Gugging mental health clinic in Austria in 1994. Dangerous Minds has the photos.
  • Hornet Stories notes that Mike Pence has tried to defend himself from Adam Rippon’s criticisms by lying about his past.
  • Information is Beautiful shares an infographic depicting the edit wars last year on Wikipedia.
  • Joe. My. God. notes that Northern Ireland may get a referendum on marriage equality, giving it a chance to catch up to the Republic of Ireland and to the rest of the United Kingdom.
  • JSTOR Daily links to a vintage article noting that trying to apply the Twenty-Fifth Amendment, which could unseat a sitting president if the president was disabled, could cause a constitutional crisis.
  • Language Hat notes a study suggesting that, as humans become more sedentary, linguistic evidence suggests smell becomes less important.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money wonders: how many films, how many novels, have been about _women_, not men, who are difficult geniuses? Where is the female equivalent of House?
  • The NYR Daily examines the Afro-futurism of 20th century novelist George Schuyler and his Black No More.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel considers what someone would see as they descended into a black hole.
  • At Towleroad, Steven Petrow tells how HIV/AIDS doctor Mathilde Krim saved his life.
  • Window on Eurasia notes one, militant, response in the Donbas republics to the breakdown of the Minsk Accords with Ukraine.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

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  • ‘Nathan Smith at Apostrophen points out the profound wrongness of a same-sex romance novel that has (for starters) protagonists involved in LGBT conversion camps described sympathetically.
  • Centauri Dreams notes the exciting new detailed surface map of Titan. Among other things, that world has a sea level common to all its liquid bodies, and they have sharp shores.
  • The Crux notes a new effort to understand Antarctica underneath the ice. What happened the last time its ice melted?
  • Bruce Dorminey notes that Venus is actually really important for astronomers who are interested in extraterrestrial life.
  • The Everyday Sociology Blog explains why it is important to learn about social theory if you’re a sociologist. Discourse matters.
  • Far Outliers notes the many translations of Hawaii’s “TheBus” into the Asian languages spoken there.
  • Hornet Stories notes research suggesting that product ads targeting LGBTQ markets can have good knock-on effects for these products’ general market share.
  • At In Media Res, Russell Arben Fox has started a series looking back at some of the best songs of 1978.
  • JSTOR Daily notes two education papers suggesting ways art education can improve empathy among students.
  • Language Hat notes a genetic study of populations in the Chachapoyas region of coastal Peru suggesting people there were not displaced by Incan expansion.
  • Language Log reports on a study that examines connections between a person’s lexical diversity and the progress of degenerative brain health issues.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money reports on the possibility that Russian money may have been funneled through the NRA.
  • The NYR Daily reports on the intensely personal performance art of Patty Chang.
  • The Planetary Society Blog reports on the latest discoveries and events surrounding the Dawn probe in its permanent Ceres orbit.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes evidence that extrasolar visitor ‘Oumuamua has been deeply shaped by its encounters with cosmic particles.
  • Transit Toronto shares detailed depictions of some of the new public art installations to be housed in six stations on the Eglinton Crosstown LRT.
  • Window on Eurasia notes the growing presence of Central Asian migrants in the smaller communities of Russia. (Chinese, unsurprisingly, have not made it there.)

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

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‘Nathan Smith at Apostrophen points out that claiming to disagree with homosexuality while respecting gay people is nonsensical. https://apostrophen.wordpress.com/2018/01/11/queer-isnt-an-opinion/

Centauri Dreams notes the innovative cheap PicSat satellite, currently monitoring Beta Pictoris with its known exoplanet. https://www.centauri-dreams.org/?p=39109

Corey Robin at Crooked Timber argues that Trump is shaky, weaker than American democracy. (Not that that is going that well, mind.) http://crookedtimber.org/2018/01/13/trumps-power-is-shakier-than-american-democracy/

The Crux points out the sentient, including emotions, of any number of animal species. http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/crux/2018/01/11/animals-feelings-sentient/

Far Outliers notes some German commanders in western Europe who quickly surrendered to the Allies in the Second World War, and why they did that. http://faroutliers.blogspot.com/2018/01/quick-german-surrenders-in-west.html

Hornet Stories notes how a court decision dealing with a Romanian man and his American husband could lead to European Union-wide recognition of same-sex marriage. https://hornetapp.com/stories/european-union-gay-marriage/

JSTOR Daily notes how air pollution is a human rights issue. https://daily.jstor.org/why-air-pollution-is-a-socioeconomic-issue/

Language Hat notes how the use of the apostrophe in the newly Latin script-using Kazakh language is controversial. http://languagehat.com/apostrophe-catastrophe-in-kazakhstan/

Geoffrey Pullim at Lingua Franca shares a passage from Muriel Spark’s fiction depicting students’ reactions to learning foreign languages. https://www.chronicle.com/blogs/linguafranca/2018/01/11/a-foreign-way-which-never-really-caught-on

The LRB Blog tells the story of Omid, an Iranian who managed to smuggle himself from his home country to a precarious life in the United Kingdom. https://www.lrb.co.uk/blog/2018/01/15/behzad-yaghmaian/omids-journey/

The Map Room Blog shares a newly-updated map of “Trumpworld” the world as seen by Donald Trump. http://www.maproomblog.com/2018/01/trumpworld/

Marginal Revolution notes research indicating that dolphins have a grasp on economics, and what this indicates about their sentience. http://marginalrevolution.com/marginalrevolution/2018/01/dolphin-capital-theory.html

The Planetary Society Blog notes how the upcoming Europa Clipper probe will be able to analyze Europa’s oceans without encountering plumes of water. http://www.planetary.org/blogs/jason-davis/2018/20180111-no-plumes-no-problem.html

The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer suggests that, with the declining import of informal rules in American politics, a future Democratic-majority Congress might be able to sneak through statehood for Puerto Rico and Washington D.C. http://noelmaurer.typepad.com/aab/2018/01/breaking-norms-by-adding-states.html

Rocky Planet reports on the disastrous mudflows that have hit southern California after the fires. http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/rockyplanet/2018/01/12/mudflows-devastate-parts-of-southern-california/

Drew Rowsome praises new horror from Matt Ruff. http://drewrowsome.blogspot.com/2018/01/lovecraft-country-matt-ruffs-multi.html

Peter Rukavina talks about his positive experiences with a walk-in mental health clinic on the Island. https://ruk.ca/content/i-went-mental-health-walk-clinic-and-so-can-you

Strange Company talks about the bizarre 1982 disappearance of one Donald Kemp. Did he even die? http://strangeco.blogspot.com/2018/01/the-strange-exit-of-donald-kemp.html

Towleroad notes that Peter Thiel is trying to buy Gawker, perhaps to destroy its archives. http://www.towleroad.com/2018/01/gawker-peter-thiel/

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

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  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait shares one picture of a vast galaxy cluster to underline how small our place in the universe is.
  • The Boston Globe’s The Big Picture shares some photos of Syrian refugee families as they settle into the United States.
  • Centauri Dreams looks at the Dragonfly proposal for a Titan lander.
  • The Crux notes the exceptional vulnerability of the cultivated banana to an otherwise obscure fungus.
  • Bruce Dorminey notes NASA’s preparation of the Clipper mission to investigate Europa.
  • The Frailest Thing’s Michael Sacasas takes a look at the role of surveillance in the life of the modern student.
  • Hornet Stories has a nice interview of Sina Grace, author of Marvel’s Iceman book.
  • Joe. My. God. reshared this holiday season a lovely anecdote, “Dance of the Sugar Plum Lesbians.”
  • JSTOR Daily took a look at why Americans like dieting so much.
  • The LRB Blog considers the Thames Barrier, the meager protection of London against tides in a time of climate change.
  • The Map Room Blog notes the digitization of radar maps of Antarctica going back to the 1960s.
  • Marginal Revolution seems cautiously optimistic about the prospects of Morocco.
  • Russell Darnley at maximos62 is skeptical about the prospects of the forests of Indonesia’s Riau province.
  • Stephanie Land at the NYR Daily talks about how she managed to combine becoming a writer with being a single mother of two young children.
  • Out There argues a lunar fuel depot could help support crewed interplanetary exploration.
  • Science Sushi notes genetic evidence the lionfish invasion of the North Atlantic off Florida began not with a single escape but with many.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel makes the argument an unmanned probe to Alpha Centauri could have significant technological spinoffs.
  • Supernova Condensate makes the point, apropos of nothing at all, that spaceship collisions can in fact unleash vast amounts of energy.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that, while Kazakhs see practical advantages to cooperation with Russia, they also see some problems.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

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  • Anthro{dendum] considers drifting on roads as an indicator of social dynamism, of creative reuse of road infrastructures by the young.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait shares photos of the Christmas Tree Cluster, a portion of NGC 2264.
  • Centauri Dreams notes how the strange polar orbit of GJ 436b indicates the presence of a neighbouring exoplanet so far not detected directly.
  • Crooked Timber considers the import of perhaps racist codings in children’s literature.
  • D-Brief examines how NASA is trying to quietly break the sound barrier.
  • Bruce Dorminey suggests building a Mars-orbit space station makes sense for us as our next major move in space.
  • Hornet Stories shares the story of queer male Lebanese belly dancer Moe Khansa and his art.
  • Language Hat notes how one student made substantial progress of decoding the ancient khipus, knotted string records, of the Incan civilization.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money makes the obvious point that opioids actually do help people manage chronic pain effectively, that they have legitimate uses.
  • Allan Metcalf at Lingua Franca talks about some of the peculiarities of English as spoken in Utah.
  • Noah Smith at Noahpinion argues the disappearance of the positive impact of college on the wages who drop out before completing their program shows the importance of higher education as a generator of human capital, not as a simple sort of signal.
  • The NYR Daily looks at some particularly egregious instances of gerrymandering in the United States.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer examines the origins of street violence as a political force in modern Argentina.
  • Roads and Kingdoms looks at the Seoul neighbourhood of Haebangchon, “Little Pyongyang,” a district once populated by North Korean and Vietnamese refugees now becoming a cosmopolitan district for people from around the world.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes the origins of the atoms of our body in stellar catastrophes detectable from across the universe.
  • Strange Company notes the case of Catherine Packard, reported dead in 1929 but then found alive. Whose body wasit?
  • Towleroad reports a study suggesting same-sex relationships tend to be more satisfying for their participants than opposite-sex relationships are for theirs.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how a Russian Orthodox group is joining the fight against Tatarstan’s autonomy.

[NEWS] Five LGBTQ links: Canadian law, Alloura Wells, Bermuda, body issues, queer nightlife

  • Arshy Mann at Daily Xtra suggests a new Canadian bill aimed at expunging unjust convictions of LGBTQ people does not go far enough in rehabilitating entire classes of victims.
  • Denise Balkissoon and Tu Thanh Ha report on the life and struggles of Alloura Wells, a biracial transgender woman who was neglected even after death, over at The Globe and Mail.
  • Rob Salerno at Daily Xtra examines why Bermuda is set to revoke marriage equality.
  • Jack Hobbs at VICE examines why body dysmorphia and poor body image are so common, still, among queer men.
  • Jeff Leavell has a nice article at VICE talking about the emancipatory potential of some avant-garde queer nightlife, catering not to narrow demographics but to broader communities.