A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘hebrew

[BLOG] Some Monday links

  • Bad Astronomy shares Hubble images of asteroid 6478 Gault, seemingly in the process of dissolving.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly writes about the experience of living in a body one knows from hard experience to be fallible.
  • Gizmodo notes new evidence that environmental stresses pushed at least some Neanderthals to engage in cannibalism.
  • Hornet Stories notes the 1967 raid by Los Angeles police against the Black Cat nightclub, a pre-Stonewall trigger of LGBTQ organization.
  • Imageo notes the imperfect deal wrought by Colorado Basin states to minimize the pain felt by drought in that river basin.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at the cinema of Claire Denis.
  • Language Log reports on the work of linguist Ghil’ad Zuckermann, a man involved in language revival efforts in Australia after work in Israel with Hebrew.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money wonders if the Iran-Contra scandal will be a precedent for the Mueller report, with the allegations being buried by studied inattention.
  • Marginal Revolution makes a case for NIMBYism leading to street urination.
  • Justin Petrone at North! looks at a theatrical performance of a modern Estonian literary classic, and what it says about gender and national identity.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw makes the case for a treaty with Australian Aborigines, to try to settle settler-indigenous relations in Australia.
  • John Quiggin looks at the factors leading to the extinction of coal as an energy source in the United Kingdom.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes that we are not yet up to the point of being able to detect exomoons of Earth-like planets comparable to our Moon.
  • Window on Eurasia notes the occasion of the last singer in the Ket language.
  • Arnold Zwicky shares some cartoon humour, around thought balloons.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

  • Architectuul talks about the remarkable and distinctive housing estates of south London, like Alexandra Road, currently under pressure from developers and unsympathetic governments.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait takes a look at Bennu, set to be visited by the OSIRIS-REx probe.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly talks about meeting people you’ve met online via social networks, making friends even. Myself, I’ve done this all the time: Why not use these networks to their fullest in a fragmented vast world?
  • Centauri Dreams celebrates the now-completed mission of the exoplanet-hunting Kepler space telescope.
  • D-Brief looks at the distinctive seasons of Triton, and the still-open questions surrounding Neptune’s largest moon.
  • At JSTOR Daily, Nancy Bilyeau writes about the import of the famous Gunpowder Plot of 1605, something often underplayed despite its potential for huge change and its connection to wider conflicts.
  • Language Hat notes the name of God in the Hebrew tradition, Yahweh. Where did it come from?
  • Language Log shares an interesting idea for helping to preserve marginalized languages: Why not throw a language party celebrating the language?
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money considers the question of what historical general or military leader would do best leading the armies of the living dead.
  • The NYR Daily looks at the problems with Erdogan’s big investments in public infrastructure in Turkey, starting with the new Istanbul airport.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel considers the possibility of life in the very early universe. Earth-like life could have started within a billion years of the Big Bang; Earth life might even have begun earlier, for that matter.
  • Frank Jacobs at Strange Maps shows a map of Europe identifying which countries are the more chauvinistic in the continent.
  • Window on Eurasia notes the strength of the relatively recent division between Tatars and Bashkirs, two closely related people with separate identities grown strong in the Soviet era.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes the discovery of activity on distant comet
    C/2017 K2.
  • Centauri Dreams notes a new proposal for an orbital telescope that could detect Earth-like worlds at Alpha Centauri A and B.
  • D-Brief notes a new research finding that chimpanzees can learn to use tools on their own, without teaching.
  • Dangerous Minds notes the interesting Detroit character of Gundella, the Green Witch of Detroit.
  • Language Log tries to decipher some garbled Hebrew at an American wedding.
  • The LRB Blog looks at the continued aftershocks, social and otherwise, from the recent earthquake in Mexico.
  • Marginal Revolution argues that North Korea is set to become more China’s problem than the United States’.
  • Roads and Kingdoms notes the simple pleasures of soy milk in China.
  • Seriously Science notes a study looking at the different factors in the personalities of cats.
  • Towleroad notes the recent discovery of an antibody effective against 99% or so variants of HIV.
  • Window on Eurasia argues Russian politics play a central role in getting Russophones in Ukraine to become Ukrainian.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

  • Anthropology.net looks at the genetics of how the Inuit have adapted to cold weather.
  • ‘Nathan Smith’s Apostrophen shares the author’s plans for the coming year.
  • Beyond the Beyond’s Bruce Sterling shares Margaret Atwood’s commitment to fighting for freedom of expression.
  • Crooked Timber asks its readers for recommendations in Anglophone science fiction.
  • D-Brief notes the discovery of the human mesentery.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze looks at the protoplanetary disk of LkCa 15 disk.
  • Far Outliers looks at some lobsters imported to Japan from (a) Christmas Island.
  • Joe. My. God. notes Janet Jackson has given birth.
  • Language Hat examines the contrast often made between indigenous and immigrant languages.
  • Language Log looks at the names of the stations of the Haifa subway.
  • Steve Munro notes Bathurst Station’s goodbye to Honest Ed’s.
  • The Planetary Society Blog examines the Dawn probe’s discoveries at Ceres in the past year.
  • Window on Eurasia looks at how the permafrost of the Russian far north is melting and endangering entire cities, and contrasts the prosperity of the Estonian city of Narva relative to the decay of adjacent Ivangorod.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

  • Centauri Dreams looks at signs of advanced technologies detectable by SETI searches.
  • D-Brief notes evidence of the domestication of turkeys in 4th and 5th century Mexico.
  • Dangerous Minds discusses a legendary 1985 concert by Einst├╝rzende Neubauten.
  • Joe. My. God. notes the banning of Tila Tequila from Twitter.
  • Language Log looks about a Hebrew advertisement that makes use of apostrophes.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money bids farewell to one of its bloggers, Scott Eric Kauffman.
  • The LRB Blog notes that Israel is fine with anti-Semites so long as they are Zionists.
  • Marginal Revolution notes that Hillary Clinton won the most economically productive areas of the United States.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer suggests anti-sprawl legislation helped lose the recent election.
  • The Russian Demographics Blog notes Russia’s banning of LinkedIn.
  • Towleroad notes Ellen Degeneres’ winning of a Presidential honor medal.
  • Window on Eurasia suggests Trump could be much less easy to handle than the Kremlin thinks, and looks at claims that small northern peoples are conspiring with foreigners.

[NEWS] Some Tuesday links

  • Bloomberg notes how an economic boom will let Sweden postpone hard decisions, looks at the popularity of the Korean Wave in China, suggests that subsidies are going to be a big issue for cash-short Arab governments, looks at the investigation in Bulgaria of groups which arrest refugees, and looks at the long-term problems of the Russian economy.
  • CBC reports on a Saskatchewan woman who has a refuge for pet rats.
  • Global News illustrates the dire social conditions in the Ontario North, hitting particularly strongly First Nations groups.
  • The Guardian reports on speculation that Neanderthals may have died in significant numbers from African diseases brought by human migrants.
  • MacLean’s notes a study of handwriting styles in ancient Israel which suggest that literacy was reasonably common.
  • The Mississauga News reports on a new PFLAG support group for South Asians in Peel.
  • National Geographic notes the strong pressures on island birds towards flightlessness.
  • Science Mag notes subtle genetic incompatibilities between human women and male Neanderthals which would have hindered reproduction.
  • The USA Today network has a story examining the recent HIV outbreak in Indiana.
  • Vice reports on the huge cleavages within the NDP, something also examined at the CBC.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

  • blogTO shares photos of Yonge and Dundas in the grimy 1970s.
  • The Big Picture shares photos from a Tibetan Buddhist assembly.
  • Crooked Timber shares a photo of Bristol’s floating bridge.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze reports on an estimate of the number of extraterrestrial technological civilizations.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes an atlas of drought in Europe.
  • Geocurrents examines the fallacy of environmental determinism.
  • Joe. My. God. notes how open travel between the European Union and Ukraine has been endangered by the failure to protect gay employment.
  • Language Hat links to an essay by a feminist talking about what it is like to live in a language environment, that of Hebrew, where everything is gendered.
  • Language Log engages with fax usage in Japan and notes rare characters in Taiwan.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes the plight of the dying steel town, all the worse because it was evitable.
  • Marginal Revolution has a bizarre defense of Ben Carson.
  • The Russian Demographics Blog and Window on Eurasia report on a rectification of the Russian-Chinese frontier.
  • Window on Eurasia is critical of village values in Russia, and notes the return of ISIS fighters to Azerbaijan.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly asks readers how they define their community.
  • Centauri Dreams looks at the Rosetta probe’s unusual comet.
  • Crooked Timber notes the death of Brian Friel.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze reports that hot Jupiter 51 Pegasi b apparently does not have rings.
  • The Dragon’s Tales suggests the bright spots on Ceres are salt deposits.
  • Language Hat wonders where the sabra accent of Hebrew comes from.
  • Languages of the World suggests grammar is a better guide to language history than words.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money looks at the Russian deployment in Syria.
  • The Map Room’s Jonathan Crowe exposes the failings of the Mercator projection.
  • Marginal Revolution wonders if there might be a South Asian free trade zone soon.
  • Out There notes that Earth’s near-twin Venus is important for many reasons, not least as a guide to exoplanets.
  • Window on Eurasia looks at population growth in the North Caucasus and examines xenophobic rhetoric in Russia.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

  • blogTO notes that John Tory wants private industry to fund a Toronto bid for the Olympics.
  • Centauri Dreams notes a paper suggesting that the effects of panspermia might be detectable, via the worlds seeded with life.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to a paper suggesting that the Earth’s geological composition is likely to be unique.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes the technological advancement of Neanderthals in Spain.
  • Far Outliers notes the extent to which some opposition to the Anglo-American invasion of Europe in the Second World War was motivated by pan-European sentiment.
  • Geocurrents dislikes very bad maps of human development in Argentina.
  • Language Hat notes that Jabotinsky wanted Hebrew to be written in Latin script.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money reports on the Sad Puppies.
  • The Russian Demographics Blog notes a book talking about a specifically Orthodox Christian take on demography.
  • Spacing Toronto looks at the first ride at the CNE.
  • Torontoist notes a Toronto libraries “passport”.
  • Understanding Society notes M.I. Finley’s excellent book on the dynamics of the Roman Empire.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy notes a bizarre article published in a journal arguing that professors are equivalents to terrorists.
  • Why I Love Toronto recommends Dream in High Park.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

  • blogTO notes that someone built a lego replica of Toronto’s Junction neighbourhood circa 1887.
  • Centauri Dreams notes the OSIRIS REx asteroid sample return mission’s launch.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze reports on the HD 219134 planetary system, just nearby.
  • The Dragon’s Tales suggests nuclear fusion is getting measurably closer.
  • Joe. My. God. has more on the man who murdered a teenage girl at Jerusalem’s pride parade.
  • Language Hat notes the attitude of Jabotinsky towards the Hebrew language.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes the mid-19th century convergence of anti-Communist and pro-slavery attitudes.
  • Marginal Revolution looks forward to an Uighur restaurant in Virginia.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw reflects on wool.
  • Torontoist reviews all of the terrible food available at the Canadian National Exhibition.
  • Towleroad reports testimony about the terrible fates facing gay men under ISIS rule.
  • Why I Love Toronto reports on the blogger’s exciting week.
  • Window on Eurasia notes the accidental release of Russia’s casualty information in the Ukrainian war, with two thousand dead.