A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘history

[URBAN NOTE] Four Toronto links: NOW Toronto, ghost signs, The Ward, Southey on Peterson

leave a comment »

  • Alice Klein of NOW Toronto asks her publication’s readers for more support. This is worrisome: I hope NOW Toronto will be OK.
  • blogTO talks about the “ghost signs” of Toronto, legacies of businesses and products long since past, with photos.
  • Toronto Life shares, from the website of the Toronto Ward Museum, a selection of photos depicting The Ward, the downtown Toronto neighbourhood erased by the construction of City Hall.
  • In a brilliant column at MacLean’s employing her trademark smart humour, Tabatha Southey wonders if Jordan Peterson is, in fact, “a stupid person’s smart man”.
Advertisements

[NEWS] Three notes about genetics and history and the future: Georgia, Beothuk, Amish

leave a comment »

  • Archeological work has revealed evidence of vineyards in the Republic of Georgia dating back eight thousand years. National Geographic reports.
  • This extended article looks at the ways in which modern genetics are revealing the ancient history of the indigenous peoples of the Americas, using the Beothuk as an example. The Guardian has it.
  • Joe O’Connor describes how an obscure mutation among the Amish governing blood clotting may offer guides for people interested in extending human longevity, over at the National Post.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

leave a comment »

  • James Bow notes, by way of explaining new fiction he is writing, why a Mercury colony makes sense.
  • JSTOR Daily notes the life of Anita Brenner, a Mexican-born American Jewish writer who helped connect the two North American neighbours.
  • Far Outliers’ Joel notes the cautious approach of the United States towards famine relief in the young Soviet Union in 1922.
  • The Frailest Thing’s Michael Sacasas shares a brief Lewis Mumford quote, talking about how men became mechanical in spirit before they invented complex machines.
  • Hornet Stories celebrates the many ways in which the movie Addams Family Values is queer.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money considers the idea of what “thoughtfulness” means in relation to Senator Al Franken.
  • The Map Room Blog shares a few more fantasy map generators.
  • The NYR Daily considers the thoughtful stamp art of Vincent Sardon.
  • Progressive Download’s John Farrell recommends Adam Rutherford’s new book, A Brief History of Everyone Who Ever Lived, on genomics and history.
  • Towleroad notes that Demi Levato took trans Virginian politician Danica Roem her to the American Music Awards.
  • Window on Eurasia shares a Tatar cleric’s speculation that Russia’s undermining of the Tatar language in education might push Tatars away from Russia.

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

leave a comment »

  • blogTO shares a raft of photos from Toronto in the 1910s.
  • Daily JSTOR notes the profound democratic symbolism of the doughnut. Seriously.
  • D-Brief notes a contentious argument that organic agriculture could, if well-managed, be productive enough to feed the population of the world.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to a study of the complex environment of dust and debris around young protostar L1527.
  • Far Outliers notes the central role of Hitler in avoiding the crushing of the BEF at Dunkirk. Apparently the British Empire and the Catholic Church were the two world forces he did not wish to crush.
  • Hornet Stories makes the perfectly obvious point that websites which collect photos of attractive guys taken without their consent are actually sketchy, legally and ethically. Why it has to be made, I don’t know.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money takes time from providing political coverage to share a recipe for a delicious-sounding slow-cooker corn/salmon/bacon chowder.
  • The Map Room Blog notes the updated looks of Google Maps.
  • The NYR Daily examines the ad hoc and DIY nature of disaster relief on Puerto Rico post-Maria.
  • Seriously Science notes a paper suggesting that bearded men tend to be more sexist than non-bearded men.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel cautions against a tendency to pick up on astronomical mysteries as proof of dark matter’s existence.
  • Window on Eurasia suggests that wealthy Russians are quietly shifting their wealth and investing in property in Europe.
  • Arnold Zwicky notes a new effort to employ the principles of Basic English, conveying as much meaning as possible with as few worlds as imaginable.

[NEWS] Four links on Antarctica: ancient Godwanaland forests, mantle plume, American infrastructure

leave a comment »

  • Elaina Zachos reports on the discovery of a remarkable intact petrified forest in Antarctica more than a quarter-billion years old, legacy of ancient Godwanaland, over at National Geographic.
  • D-Brief reports on the remarkable adaptations of the forests of Godwanaland, now Antarctica, to six months without light.
  • Universe Today reports that a hitherto unsupected plume from the mantle underneath Antarctica may be partially responsible for the ready melting of that continent’s ice sheets.
  • Justin Gillis and Jonathan Corum report on how the infrastructure of the American presence in Antarctica, including McMurdo station, is in desperate need for investment to compensate for decades of neglect, over at the New York Times.

Written by Randy McDonald

November 18, 2017 at 10:30 pm

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

leave a comment »

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes the discovery of Ross 128 b, a nearby exoplanet that looks like it actually might be plausibly very Earth-like.
  • blogTO notes that, after a decade, the east entrance of the Royal Ontario Museum is finally going to be an entrance again.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly talks about the importance of self-care, of making time to experience pleasure.
  • Crooked Timber shares some of the 1871 etchings of Gustave Doré, fresh from the Paris Commune.
  • Daily JSTOR notes how one man’s collection of old tin cans tells a remarkable story about the settlement of the United States.
  • Dangerous Minds shares a vintage 1980 television report on the Los Angeles punk scene.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze notes a recent study of chemical abundances around Kronos and Krios, two very similar stars near each other, these abundances suggesting they are just forming planetary systems.
  • Gizmodo shares a revealing new table of exoplanets, one that brings out all sorts of interesting patterns and types.
  • Hornet Stories notes Courtney Love’s efforts to fundraise for LGBTQ homeless youth.
  • Joe. My. God. notes that Margaret Court, an Australian tennis star now more famous for her homophobia, called for Australia to ignore the postal vote for marriage equality.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money makes the point that Trump’s Russian links are important to explore, not least because they reveal the spreading influence of kleptocracy.
  • Lingua Franca shares a perhaps over-stereotypical take on languages being caught between drives for purity and for diversity.
  • The LRB Blog notes the murder of Honduran environmental activist Berta Cácares.
  • The Map Room Blog links to an interesting collection of links to future and alternate-history mass transit maps of Melbourne.
  • The NYR Daily links to an interesting exhibit about disposable fashion like the simple T-shirt.
  • Roads and Kingdoms notes a remarkable performance of a Beatles song in the hill country of West Bengal.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

leave a comment »

  • Dangerous Minds shares some of the exotic space music of composer Pauline Anna Strom.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to a paper examining the effect of in-system super-Earth on asteroid impacts upon terrestrial planets.
  • Hornet Stories, for ones, notes that Cards Against Humanity has bought up a stretch along the US-Mexican border to prevent the construction of a border wall.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money reminds people–sad that it has to be done–that, even in Trump outposts like Johnstown in Pennsylvania where racism has replaced reason among too many, there still are good things in this and other like communities.
  • The LRB Blog considers the plight of British-Iranian Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe, whose plight in Iranian custody has been worsened by her government. What can be done for her?
  • Marginal Revolution notes how, in the early 20th century as in the early 21st century, substantial immigration to the US became politically controversial despite its benefits.
  • The NYR Daily takes a look at the art of Tove Jansson, beyond the Moomins.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer takes a look at the slow emergence of Canadian citizenship distinct from the British over the 20th century.
  • Roads and Kingdoms takes</u. a look at the grape-crashing of the vineyards of Oliver, British Columbia.
  • Peter Rukavina describes the origin of the theme music of CBC classic show The Friendly Giant in the 18th century English folk tune “Early One Morning.”
  • Seriously Science notes that oysters can apparently hear sound.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that the autonomy enjoyed by Puerto Rico was one source of inspiration for the nationalists of Tatarstan in the early 1990s.