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Posts Tagged ‘hiv/aids

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

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  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait shares beautiful images of nebula Sharpless 2-29, brilliant and beautiful from the heart of our galaxy.
  • Centauri Dreams notes how New Horizons is maneuvering for its rendezvous with KBO MU69 on 1 January 2019.
  • Daily JSTOR notes how Indian schools were at once vehicles for the assimilation of American indigenous peoples and also sites for potential resistance.
  • Dangerous Minds shares the vintage Vampirella art of Enrique Torres-Prat.
  • From Tumblr, Explain It Like I’m Not From Lawrence looks at a very unusual tower in the downtown of that Kansas community.
  • Hornet Stories notes that PrEP is becoming available in Brazil, but only for a small subset of potential users.
  • Imageo notes a recent American study observing that the degree of Arctic heating is in at least two millennia.
  • Joe. My. God. notes that Bermuda has repealed marriage equality. I can’t help but think this will not help the island’s tourism.
  • Language Hat links to a new encyclopedia article examining the origins of the Japanese language. I’m surprised the article suggests there are no verifiable links to Korean, Paekche aside.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money has an after-action report on the Alabama senate election. I agree with most of the conclusions–certainly it shows a need to contest every election!
  • Allan Metcalf at Lingua Franca quite likes the term “fake news” for its specific power, claiming it as his word of 2017.
  • The NYR Daily reflects on an exhibition of the powerful works of Modigliani.
  • The Planetary Society Blog reports on some infrared images taken by Juno of Jupiter and volcanic Io.
  • Roads and Kingdoms shares 21 pieces of advice for people interested in visiting Iran as tourists.
  • Towleroad’s list of the Top 10 albums of 2017 is worth paying attention to.
  • If this Window on Eurasia report is correct and HIV seroprevalence in Russia is twice the proportion officially claimed, 1.5% of the population …
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[BLOG] Some Thursday links

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  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes J0045, once thought to be a star in Andromeda and but recognized as a binary black hole a thousand times further away.
  • Centauri Dreams notes the longevity of the Voyager mission.
  • D-Brief notes that some worms can thrive in a simulacrum of Mars soil.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze notes an ambitious effort to try to detect a transit of Proxima Centauri b. Did the researchers pick something up?
  • Hornet Stories links to a report suggesting HIV denialism is worryingly common in parts of Russia.
  • Language Log reports on an apparently oddly bilingual Chinese/Vietnamese poster. Where did it come from?
  • The LRB Blog reports on how Tunisian Anouar Brahem fused jazz with Arabic music on his new album Blue Maqems.
  • The Map Room Blog links to a lecture by John Cloud on indigenous contributions to mapmaking in Alaska.
  • The NYR Daily looks at the grim position of Theresa May in Brexit negotiations.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer considers what would have happened if the Americas had not been populated in 1492. How would imperialism and settlement differ?
  • Roads and Kingdoms notes some of the architectural legacies–houses, for instance–of Basque settlement in the American West.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes three conundrums that neutrinos might be able to solve.
  • Window on Eurasia notes why Russia is hostile, despite its program of merging federal units, to the idea of uniting Tatarstan with Bashkortostan.
  • Using an interwar map of Imperial Airways routes, Alex Harrowell illustrates how the construction of globalized networks can make relatively marginal areas quite central.

[URBAN NOTE] Five Toronto links: the honoured dead, Cinesphere, Casey House, Quayside, Leslieviille

  • Torontoist’s Historicist takes a look at the issue of improving the grave of William Lyon Mackenzie in the 1930s.
  • Norman Wilner celebrates the newly reopened Cinesphere, down at a reenergizing Ontario Place.
  • Alex Bozikovic celebrates the beautiful new renovation and expansion of HIV/AIDS hospice Casey House.
  • John Lorinc notes the many potential problems with the investments of Google’s Sidewalk in Quayside.
  • Vjosa Isai celebrates the 30th anniversary of a mural that helped name, and give shape, to Leslieville, over at the Toronto Star.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

  • Anthrodendum takes an extended look at sexual harassment in anthropology, drawing from #metoo.
  • Crooked Timber considers the so-called Amazon-Facebook-Google “trinet” set to take over from the free Internet.
  • Dead Things considers if the Americas could have been populated by early migration down the coast, the “kelp route”.
  • Samuel Hatmaker’s Lego portrait of RuPaul is profiled in Hornet Stories.
  • Language Hat considers an untranslatable poem of Pasternak.
  • Language Log notes how Manafort’s legal team confused “Cyprus” with “cypress”.
  • Robert Farley of Lawyers, Guns and Money shares an interview of his with the Indian consul-general in Houston on the nature of the latter’s work.
  • Tyler Cowen of Marginal Revolution argues blaming Facebook for electoral manipulation overlooks the responsibility of individual voters.
  • The NYR Daily notes that the Kurds have paid the price for Trump’s dealings with Iran.
  • Roads and Kingdoms explores the surprisingly living Central Cemetery of Vienna.
  • Drew Rowsome explores the literature of horror writer Robert Sherman.
  • Towleroad notes BPM, the Oscar-contending French film about the AIDS crisis in that country.
  • Window on Eurasia notes the oddness of a pledge by China to fight illegal migration by Chinese into Russia.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes that the Earth can easily survive without us.
  • blogTO notes that the Aga Khan Museum recently made an appearance in Star Trek: Discovery, as Vulcan.
  • Centauri Dreams notes the way neutron star collisions and kilonovas can be used to examine physical laws in extreme circumstances.
  • Hornet Stories notes that trans political candidate Danica Roem, in Virginia, is getting lots of positive attention.
  • The LRB Blog visits Gdansk only to find popular anti-Muslim xenophobia thriving.
  • The NYR Daily looks at photographic and other legacies of the Jamaica dancehall scene.
  • The Planetary Society Blog looks at the evolution of SETI from the 1960s to the present.
  • Roads and Kingdoms looks at the struggle of astronomers, in West Texas and elsewhere, to preserve dark skies.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel looks at the ways in which GW170817 has confirmed the Standard Model.
  • Window on Eurasia argues that reactionary conservatism in Russia is making that country’s HIV/AIDS epidemic worse.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • Anthropology.net notes that the analysis of a Neanderthal skeleton from Croatia reveals much common ancestry.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait shares some stunning photos of Jupiter taken by the Juno probe.
  • Crooked Timber considers the differences–such as they are–between science fiction and fantasy literature.
  • After a conversation with Adam Gopnik, Cody Delistraty makes a case for the importance of high-brow culture.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze notes a paper arguing that Earth-like planets can exist even without active plate tectonics.
  • The Frailest Thing’s Michael Sacasas argues that operating systems relying on instinct hurt human thought.
  • Language Log considers Twitter post limits for East Asian languages.
  • The LRB Blog considers trench fever and the future of nursing in the United Kingdom.
  • Marginal Revolution links to a study suggesting people actively look out for bad and threatening news items.
  • The NYR Daily examines the reasons why Uber ended up getting banned by the city of London.
  • Drew Rowsome reports on an exciting new staging at the Paramount Theatre of Salt-Water Moon.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel looks at the very low proportion of planets in studied exosystems actually detected by Kepler.
  • Strange Company tells the story of John Banvard, a 19th century American who lost everything in mounting panorama exhibitions.
  • Towleroad reports on how PREP contributed to an 80% fall in new HIV diagnoses in London and wider England.
  • Window on Eurasia notes the worsening of HIV/AIDS in Russia, aided by terrible government policy and bad statistics.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes the discovery of activity on distant comet
    C/2017 K2.
  • Centauri Dreams notes a new proposal for an orbital telescope that could detect Earth-like worlds at Alpha Centauri A and B.
  • D-Brief notes a new research finding that chimpanzees can learn to use tools on their own, without teaching.
  • Dangerous Minds notes the interesting Detroit character of Gundella, the Green Witch of Detroit.
  • Language Log tries to decipher some garbled Hebrew at an American wedding.
  • The LRB Blog looks at the continued aftershocks, social and otherwise, from the recent earthquake in Mexico.
  • Marginal Revolution argues that North Korea is set to become more China’s problem than the United States’.
  • Roads and Kingdoms notes the simple pleasures of soy milk in China.
  • Seriously Science notes a study looking at the different factors in the personalities of cats.
  • Towleroad notes the recent discovery of an antibody effective against 99% or so variants of HIV.
  • Window on Eurasia argues Russian politics play a central role in getting Russophones in Ukraine to become Ukrainian.