A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘hiv/aids

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • Kambiz Kamrani at Anthropology.net notes new research suggesting that all modern Australian Aborigine languages descend from a single ancestor more than ten thousands years ago.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly considers the search for one’s spiritual home.
  • Centauri Dreams notes the planned ESA ARIEL mission, intended to study exoplanet formation and atmospheres.
  • Crooked Timber considers the prospects for the university in the United Kingdom, post-strike.
  • D-Brief notes a study suggesting the worlds of TRAPPIST-1 might be too wet, too water-rich, to sustain life.
  • Cody Delistraty shares an interview with Nancy Jo Sales on everything from childhood to Facebook.
  • Dead Things notes the discovery of human footprints on the seafloor off of British Columbia, predating the Ice Age.
  • Bruce Dorminey notes the possibility that ocean worlds in the “ice cap zone” could manage to support life
  • Drew Ex Machina takes a look at the observations to date of near-Jovian analogue world Epsilon Indi Ab.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes ambitious plans by one private space development company to set up a functioning cislunar economy.
  • Hornet Stories notes the upcoming re-release of Garbage’s second album, Version 2.0.
  • In A State of Migration’s Lyman Stone takes a look at the regional origins of German immigrants to the US in the mid-19th century.
  • Joe. My. God. notes that Grindr shares private user data with third parties that, among other things, would allow them to determine the HIV status of different individuals.
  • JSTOR Daily notes the struggle for equal civil rights in Alaska, as indigenous people fought for equality.
  • The NYR Daily reports on an interesting exhibit of post-Second World War modern art from Germany.
Advertisements

[NEWS] Seven LGBTQ links: Love Simon, Toronto, recipes, Italy, former Soviet Union, Obama

  • NOW Toronto gives a glowing review to Love, Simon, one that praises the film for its quality and for its importance.
  • CBC reports on how Toronto police seem to have badly mishandled Abdulbasir Faizi.
  • The inquiry into the alleged McArthur murders most definitely should be independent of police chief Saunders. NOW Toronto reportsA.
  • This story of how a recipe for pickled cucumbers survived the AIDS epidemic of the 1980s is powerful. Taste Cooking has it.
  • The way in which LGBTQ rights became a hot political issue in the recent Italian elections is not good. Open Democracy reports.
  • The politicization of homophobia across the former Soviet Union is horrible. Open Democracy reports.
  • Why do so many people on the American right insist that Obama is gay? VICE reports.

[NEWS] Six LGBTQ links: violence, The 519, William Whitehead, art, pink triangle, Janelle Monáe

  • I have been sitting on, thinking of, this R.M. Vaughan essay in The Globe and Mail reflecting on the high levels of violence queer men have to deal with for some time. All I can say, really, is that in the years I’ve lived in Toronto, I’ve felt what I’ve come to realize is a sense of safety that I never had living on PEI. The essay is here.
  • The Globe and Mail reports on how the 519 Community Centre, in Church and Wellesley, is facing criticism that it has lost touch with its roots in the LGBTQ communities, especially marginalized ones.
  • William Whitehead, a writer of documentaries for CBC perhaps most famous as the partner of the late Canlit giant Timothy Findley, died this past week. The Globe and Mail eulogizes.
  • CBC reports on a new exhibition of queer art in Thunder Bay.
  • The Forward reports on how, in the middle of the AIDS epidemic, artist Avram Finkelstein repurposed the pink triangle of the Nazis into an iconic badge for our era.
  • As Janelle Monáe continues moving on out (she seems to have a nice girlfriend), Vulture looks at the interesting trope of bisexual lighting.

[PHOTO] “Take Part in a Sexual Health Revolution”

My eye was caught when I saw, on a subway train somewhere in Brooklyn, this ad advertising PrEP.

"Take Part in a Sexual Health Revolution" #newyorkcity #newyork #subway #ad #prep #hiv #hivaids #hivawareness #latergram #preexposureprophylaxis

The preventative use of the drug Truvada to prevent HIV infection in HIV-negative people has come a long way. I first noted PrEP directly in a November 2014 post, that one reflecting on how far the idea of using anti-HIV medications to prevent HIV infection had come since I first heard of the idea in a 2005 article talking about how crystal meth users would take Truvada component tenofovir before heading off on drug-fueled orgies.

PrEP has gone far beyond those early days. It is now mainstream, approved of by the CDC and supported by the New York City Department of Health. Local health organizations like the Gay Men’s Health Crisis and the Callen-Lorde Community Health Centre can apparently set people up with Truvada at reasonable cost and in reasonable amounts of time. It’s even available in Canada, Truvada being covered since September under Ontario’s provincial drug plan. I’m considering the mechanics of getting on it myself.

And yet, here in Ontario and in Toronto, home to a MSM community surely as intrisically at risk of HIV infection as New York City’s, PrEP does not have nearly the same mainstream presence as in New York City. The biggest article I’ve seen on it on the non-LGBTQ media was Josh Dehaas’ oddly dismissive article. Straight people I’ve talked to about the drug here in Canada have been routinely amazed by the fact of the existence of PrEP. Shouldn’t Toronto, at least, try to change this?

Written by Randy McDonald

February 3, 2018 at 2:45 pm

[NEWS] Five LGBTQ links: Josh Weed, James McCourt, Upstairs Inferno, PrEP, Hall of Justice

  • NewNowNext notes the divorce of out gay Mormon Josh Weed from his wife, after they realized their marriage wasn’t working. To his belated credit, he seems to be quite upset at the way that his personal story was used to justify homophobia.
  • At The New Yorker, Michael LaPointe celebrates James McCourt’s 1993 novel about the AIDS epidemic, Time Remaining.
  • Towleroad notes the odd and harmful refusal of the Publix grocery store chain to let its insurance companies cover Truvada prescriptions, for PrEP.
  • Drew Rowsome reviews Upstairs Inferno, a recent documentary about a fire in a New Orleans gay bar in 1973 that killed dozens and its aftermath.
  • R.M. Vaughan reports for The Globe and Mail about the new Hall of Justice poster program in Toronto, aimed to popularize LGBTQ heroes.

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

  • Crooked Timber seeks advice for academics trying to publish general-interest books.
  • The Frailest Thing’s Michael Sacasas considers the extent, and the way, in which technological change can outstrip the ability of cultures and institutions to manage this change.
  • Hornet Stories notes the many ways in which the Trump Presidency is proving to be terrible for HIV-positive people around the world.
  • Sara Jaffe at JSTOR Daily explores the concept of queer time. What is time like for queer people if the traditional markers of adulthood–marriage, children, and so on–are unavailable? How do they think of life stages?
  • Language Log looks at the complexities of language in Hong Kong under Chinese rule.
  • Drew Rowsome reports on the latest theatre piece of Jordan Tannahill, Declarations.
  • Window on Eurasia reports on declining flows of migrants from elsewhere in the former Soviet Union to Russia.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

  • Anthropology.net notes that the discovery of an ancient Homo sapiens jawbone in Israel pushes back the history of our species by quite a bit.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait shares stunning photos of spiral galaxy NGC 1398.
  • Centauri Dreams considers the ways in which the highly reflective surface of Europa might be misleading to probes seeking to land on its surface.
  • The Dragon’s Tales rounds up more information about extrasolar visitor ‘Oumuamua.
  • Far Outliers considers the staggering losses, human and territorial and strategic, of Finland in the Winter War.
  • Hornet Stories notes preliminary plans to set up an original sequel to Call Me Be Your Name later in the 1980s, in the era of AIDS.
  • Russell Arben Fox at In Media Res considers if Wichita will be able to elect a Wichitan as governor of Kansas, for the first time in a while.
  • io9 takes a look at the interesting ways in which Star Wars and Star Trek have been subverting traditional audience assumptions about these franchises.
  • JSTOR Daily links to a paper examining what decision-makers in North Vietnam were thinking on the eve of the Tet offensive, fifty years ago.
  • The LRB Blog takes a look at a new book examining the 1984 IRA assassination attempt against Margaret Thatcher.
  • The Map Room Blog links to an article examining how school districts, not just electoral districts, can be products of gerrymandering.
  • Marginal Revolution seeks suggestions for good books to explain Canada to non-Canadians, and comes up with a shortlist of its own.
  • Kenan Malik at the NYR Daily takes a look at contemporary efforts to justify the British Empire as good for its subjects. Who is doing this, and why?