A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘hiv/aids

[NEWS] Six LGBTQ links: violence, The 519, William Whitehead, art, pink triangle, Janelle Monáe

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  • I have been sitting on, thinking of, this R.M. Vaughan essay in The Globe and Mail reflecting on the high levels of violence queer men have to deal with for some time. All I can say, really, is that in the years I’ve lived in Toronto, I’ve felt what I’ve come to realize is a sense of safety that I never had living on PEI. The essay is here.
  • The Globe and Mail reports on how the 519 Community Centre, in Church and Wellesley, is facing criticism that it has lost touch with its roots in the LGBTQ communities, especially marginalized ones.
  • William Whitehead, a writer of documentaries for CBC perhaps most famous as the partner of the late Canlit giant Timothy Findley, died this past week. The Globe and Mail eulogizes.
  • CBC reports on a new exhibition of queer art in Thunder Bay.
  • The Forward reports on how, in the middle of the AIDS epidemic, artist Avram Finkelstein repurposed the pink triangle of the Nazis into an iconic badge for our era.
  • As Janelle Monáe continues moving on out (she seems to have a nice girlfriend), Vulture looks at the interesting trope of bisexual lighting.

[PHOTO] “Take Part in a Sexual Health Revolution”

My eye was caught when I saw, on a subway train somewhere in Brooklyn, this ad advertising PrEP.

"Take Part in a Sexual Health Revolution" #newyorkcity #newyork #subway #ad #prep #hiv #hivaids #hivawareness #latergram #preexposureprophylaxis

The preventative use of the drug Truvada to prevent HIV infection in HIV-negative people has come a long way. I first noted PrEP directly in a November 2014 post, that one reflecting on how far the idea of using anti-HIV medications to prevent HIV infection had come since I first heard of the idea in a 2005 article talking about how crystal meth users would take Truvada component tenofovir before heading off on drug-fueled orgies.

PrEP has gone far beyond those early days. It is now mainstream, approved of by the CDC and supported by the New York City Department of Health. Local health organizations like the Gay Men’s Health Crisis and the Callen-Lorde Community Health Centre can apparently set people up with Truvada at reasonable cost and in reasonable amounts of time. It’s even available in Canada, Truvada being covered since September under Ontario’s provincial drug plan. I’m considering the mechanics of getting on it myself.

And yet, here in Ontario and in Toronto, home to a MSM community surely as intrisically at risk of HIV infection as New York City’s, PrEP does not have nearly the same mainstream presence as in New York City. The biggest article I’ve seen on it on the non-LGBTQ media was Josh Dehaas’ oddly dismissive article. Straight people I’ve talked to about the drug here in Canada have been routinely amazed by the fact of the existence of PrEP. Shouldn’t Toronto, at least, try to change this?

Written by Randy McDonald

February 3, 2018 at 2:45 pm

[NEWS] Five LGBTQ links: Josh Weed, James McCourt, Upstairs Inferno, PrEP, Hall of Justice

  • NewNowNext notes the divorce of out gay Mormon Josh Weed from his wife, after they realized their marriage wasn’t working. To his belated credit, he seems to be quite upset at the way that his personal story was used to justify homophobia.
  • At The New Yorker, Michael LaPointe celebrates James McCourt’s 1993 novel about the AIDS epidemic, Time Remaining.
  • Towleroad notes the odd and harmful refusal of the Publix grocery store chain to let its insurance companies cover Truvada prescriptions, for PrEP.
  • Drew Rowsome reviews Upstairs Inferno, a recent documentary about a fire in a New Orleans gay bar in 1973 that killed dozens and its aftermath.
  • R.M. Vaughan reports for The Globe and Mail about the new Hall of Justice poster program in Toronto, aimed to popularize LGBTQ heroes.

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

  • Crooked Timber seeks advice for academics trying to publish general-interest books.
  • The Frailest Thing’s Michael Sacasas considers the extent, and the way, in which technological change can outstrip the ability of cultures and institutions to manage this change.
  • Hornet Stories notes the many ways in which the Trump Presidency is proving to be terrible for HIV-positive people around the world.
  • Sara Jaffe at JSTOR Daily explores the concept of queer time. What is time like for queer people if the traditional markers of adulthood–marriage, children, and so on–are unavailable? How do they think of life stages?
  • Language Log looks at the complexities of language in Hong Kong under Chinese rule.
  • Drew Rowsome reports on the latest theatre piece of Jordan Tannahill, Declarations.
  • Window on Eurasia reports on declining flows of migrants from elsewhere in the former Soviet Union to Russia.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

  • Anthropology.net notes that the discovery of an ancient Homo sapiens jawbone in Israel pushes back the history of our species by quite a bit.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait shares stunning photos of spiral galaxy NGC 1398.
  • Centauri Dreams considers the ways in which the highly reflective surface of Europa might be misleading to probes seeking to land on its surface.
  • The Dragon’s Tales rounds up more information about extrasolar visitor ‘Oumuamua.
  • Far Outliers considers the staggering losses, human and territorial and strategic, of Finland in the Winter War.
  • Hornet Stories notes preliminary plans to set up an original sequel to Call Me Be Your Name later in the 1980s, in the era of AIDS.
  • Russell Arben Fox at In Media Res considers if Wichita will be able to elect a Wichitan as governor of Kansas, for the first time in a while.
  • io9 takes a look at the interesting ways in which Star Wars and Star Trek have been subverting traditional audience assumptions about these franchises.
  • JSTOR Daily links to a paper examining what decision-makers in North Vietnam were thinking on the eve of the Tet offensive, fifty years ago.
  • The LRB Blog takes a look at a new book examining the 1984 IRA assassination attempt against Margaret Thatcher.
  • The Map Room Blog links to an article examining how school districts, not just electoral districts, can be products of gerrymandering.
  • Marginal Revolution seeks suggestions for good books to explain Canada to non-Canadians, and comes up with a shortlist of its own.
  • Kenan Malik at the NYR Daily takes a look at contemporary efforts to justify the British Empire as good for its subjects. Who is doing this, and why?

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

  • The Big Picture shares adorable photos of baby animals.
  • Multi-planet system K2-138 is one of the systems found via crowdsourcing, Centauri Dreams notes.
  • I did not know that David Bowie and Brian Eno visited the Gugging mental health clinic in Austria in 1994. Dangerous Minds has the photos.
  • Hornet Stories notes that Mike Pence has tried to defend himself from Adam Rippon’s criticisms by lying about his past.
  • Information is Beautiful shares an infographic depicting the edit wars last year on Wikipedia.
  • Joe. My. God. notes that Northern Ireland may get a referendum on marriage equality, giving it a chance to catch up to the Republic of Ireland and to the rest of the United Kingdom.
  • JSTOR Daily links to a vintage article noting that trying to apply the Twenty-Fifth Amendment, which could unseat a sitting president if the president was disabled, could cause a constitutional crisis.
  • Language Hat notes a study suggesting that, as humans become more sedentary, linguistic evidence suggests smell becomes less important.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money wonders: how many films, how many novels, have been about _women_, not men, who are difficult geniuses? Where is the female equivalent of House?
  • The NYR Daily examines the Afro-futurism of 20th century novelist George Schuyler and his Black No More.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel considers what someone would see as they descended into a black hole.
  • At Towleroad, Steven Petrow tells how HIV/AIDS doctor Mathilde Krim saved his life.
  • Window on Eurasia notes one, militant, response in the Donbas republics to the breakdown of the Minsk Accords with Ukraine.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly talks about her love for New York’s famous, dynamic, Hudson River.
  • Centauri Dreams notes the amazing potential for pulsar navigation to provide almost absolutely reliable guidance across the space of at least a galaxy.
  • Far Outliers notes the massive scale of German losses in France after the Normandy invasion.
  • Hornet Stories looks at the latest on theories as to the origin of homosexuality.
  • Joe. My. God remembers Dr. Mathilde Krim, dead this week at 91, one of the early medical heroes of HIV/AIDS in New York City.
  • JSTOR Daily takes a look at what, exactly, is K-POP.
  • Language Log notes that, in Xinjiang, the Chinese government has opted to repress education in the Mongolian language.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money suggests that the risk of war in Korea is less than the media suggests.
  • At Chronicle’s Lingua Franca, Ben Yagoda looks at redundancy in writing styles.
  • The NYR Daily looks at the complex relationship of French publishing house Gallimard to Céline and his Naziphile anti-Semitism.
  • The Planetary Society Blog looks at the latest images of Venus from Japan’s Akatsuki probe.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer notes the apparent willingness of Trump to use a wall with Mexico–tariffs, particularly–to pay for the wall.
  • Spacing reviews a new book examining destination architecture.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel considers what I think is a plausible concept: Could be that there are plenty of aliens out there and we are just missing them?
  • At Strange Maps, Frank Jacobs shares a map of “Tabarnia”, the region of Catalonia around Barcelona that is skeptical of Catalonian separatism and is being positioned half-seriously as another secessionist entity.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that an actively used language is hardly the only mechanism by which a separatist identity can exist.