A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘holidays

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

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  • Apostrophen’s ‘Nathan Smith writes about Christmas cards and memory.
  • blogTO notes the impending expansion of the Drake Hotel.
  • The Broadside Blog describes a documentary, The Eagle Huntress, about a Mongolian teenage girl who becomes a hunter using eagles, that sounds spectacular.
  • Crooked Timber asks readers to help a teenager who has been arrested by the LAPD.
  • Dangerous Minds notes some weird monsters from Japanese folklore.
  • The Dragon’s Tales suggests that the Hellas basin hides the remnants of its ocean.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes the finding that Russia was trying to get Trump elected.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy considers the issue of hate speech and immigration.
  • Window on Eurasia quotes a former Ukrainian president who argues Russia does not want to restore the Soviet Union so much as it wants to dominate others.
  • The Yorkshire Ranter notes how the Daily Telegraph is recommending its readers use tax shelters.
  • Arnold Zwicky looks at the language of side-eye and stink-eye.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

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  • Apostrophen’s ‘Nathan Smith has a two part review of some of the fiction that he has recently read.
  • blogTO looks at Casa Loma lit up for the holidays.
  • Dangerous Minds notes The London Nobody Knows, a documentary of the grim areas of late Victorian London.
  • Language Hat looks at how 16th century Spanish linguists represented Nahuatl spelling.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes the iatrogenic transmission of syphilis via unsterile instruments during the Civil War.
  • The LRB Blog notes the many conflicting contracts signed by the KGB with different television groups at the end of the Cold War.
  • Marginal Revolution notes Rio de Janeiro’s attempts to deal with tourism-targeted crime by compensating victims with a tourist-directed tax.
  • Maximos62 looks at the geological reasons for Indonesia’s volcanism.
  • Progressive Download looks at the all-woman Homeward Bound expedition to Antarctica.
  • Peter Rukavina looks at the backstory behind the creation of the village of Crapaud.
  • Spacing Toronto looks at how signs asking people to go slow in children-inhabited zones.
  • Torontoist looks at where Suicide Squad was filmed in Toronto.
  • The Understanding Society Blog looks at the specific experiences which molded the French tradition of sociology.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

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  • blogTO reports on the Union Station Holiday Market.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly writes about how she has fled toxic environments.
  • Centauri Dreams considers the next generation of observational astronomy with Alpha Centauri in mind.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze looks at how foreseeeable advances may mean that Proxima Centauri b’s atmosphere could soon by studied for indirect signs of life.
  • Far Outliers notes how, in the dying ways of the War of American Independence, British forces were setting slaves free.
  • Language Log shares Chinese science fiction writer Ken Liu’s thoughts about the Chinese language and Chinese literature.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money warns about the potential threat posed to indigenous peoples in the United States by the Trump Administration.
  • The LRB Blog considers the likely fates of Italy after Renzi.
  • The Planetary Society Blog describes the impending launch of a solar sail craft into orbit.
  • Savage Minds considers ways in which the different subfields of anthropology can more profitably interact, looking at scholarship and politics both.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy argues that the American left should make the Trump Administration cause to advocate for a renewed federalism.
  • Arnold Zwicky writes about the art of being camp and its selective deployments.

[URBAN NOTE] “How Christmas Markets Have Gone Global”

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Torontoist’s Emily Macrae looks at the globalization of the Christmas Market.

In a city known for snow, skiing, and hearty cuisine, wooden stalls fill a downtown park to create an annual Christmas market. The scene is Sapporo, Japan, which has hosted a German Christmas Market since 2002.

Japan’s fourth-largest city might seem like an unlikely place to find Bavarian specialties, like pretzels, each December, but the event is a result of Sapporo’s relationship with its sister city, Munich.

Christmas markets have a long history in Germany, dating back to the Middle Ages, with the first written records of the winter festivals appearing in the mid-1600s. Today, there are some 2,500 markets in Germany, and similar practices are found in neighbouring countries.

As anyone who’s wandered through the Distillery District’s Christmas Market can attest, vendors typically sell crafts and other gifts alongside warming food and drink. From glogg (mulled wine) in Denmark to grzane piwo (mulled beer) in Poland, there is no shortage of festive beverages, and Canadian gamay may soon join the ranks of holiday icons.

Sapporo shows that Christmas markets have expanded beyond their origins in Central Europe to become a global phenomenon. So if countless cities across multiple continents boast markets, do these seasonal events contribute to the unique identity of a community or simply entrench each place as an interchangeable site of shopping and off-key songs?

Written by Randy McDonald

December 7, 2016 at 12:00 pm

[BLOG] Some Monday links

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  • Apostrophen’s ‘Nathan Smith tells the story of how he and his husband got the latest ornament for their tree.
  • blogTO looks at Toronto Instagram star Aimee Hernandez.
  • Language Hat parses the language of Wallace Stegner’s fiction.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes the worrying spread of smears and lies.
  • Marginal Revolution looks at a musical highway in New Mexico.
  • Torontoist describes biking in Toronto in the 1970s.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy takes issue with the new Gilmore Girls.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that Russia would not accept Ukraine’s Finlandization and reports on dissent among Russia’s Muslims with the idea of a new state-imposed hierarchy.

[PHOTO] Fourteen photos from the Toronto Christmas Market, Distillery District

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Last night, I paid my $C 6 to get into the Distillery District for the Toronto Christmas Market. It was worth it, for the energy of being out among the crowds enjoying a winter night just cold enough to numb unprotected hands.

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Written by Randy McDonald

December 5, 2016 at 1:32 pm

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

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  • At Apostrophen, ‘Nathan Smith talks about how he made a tradition out of Christmas tree ornamentation over the past twenty years.
  • blogTO notes that Toronto’s waterfront has major E Coli issues.
  • Crooked Timber notes the potential for the recent by-election in London, fought on Brexit and lost by the Tories, to mean something.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze reports on a search for radio flares from brown dwarfs.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes that China has been installing ecologies on its artificial South China Sea islands.
  • The Everyday Sociology Blog considers what it means to be an ally.
  • The LRB Blog looks at the complex peace negotiations in Colombia.
  • The Map Room Blog shares a map of American infrastructure.
  • Marginal Revolution notes a one-terabyte drive passed from person to person that serves as a sort of Internet in Cuba.
  • Towleroad notes a film project by one Leo Herrera that aims to imagine what prominent AIDS victims would have done and been like had their not been killed by the epidemic.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy notes the complexities surrounding Brexit.
  • Arnold Zwicky has had enough with linguistic prescriptivism.