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Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘hr 8799

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

  • Bad Astronomy’s Phil Plait notes the first time that an exoplanet, HR 8799e, has been directly observed using optical interferometry.
  • Centauri Dreams notes the possibility, demonstrated by the glimpsing of a circumplanetary disc around exoplanet PDS 70b, that we might be seeing a moon system in formation.
  • The Citizen Science Salon looks what observers in Antarctica are contributing to our wealth of scientific knowledge.
  • The Dragon’s Tales shares links to articles looking at the latest findings on the Precambrian Earth.
  • The Frailest Thing’s L.M. Sacasas writes about his ambivalent response to a Twitter that, by its popularity, undermines the open web.
  • Gizmodo notes that NASA is going to open up the International Space Station to tourists.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at how croquet, upon its introduction in the 19th century United States, was seen as scandalous for the way it allowed men and women to mix freely.
  • Shakezula at Lawyers, Guns and Money notes the unaccountable fondness of at least two Maine Republican legislators for the Confederacy.
  • Marginal Revolution suggests that the economic success of Israel in recent decades is a triumph of neoliberalism.
  • Stephen Ellis at the NYR Daily writes about the gymnastics of Willem de Kooning.
  • Drew Rowsome profiles out comic Brendan D’Souza.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel looks at the still strange galaxy NGC 1052-DF2, apparently devoid of dark matter.
  • John Scalzi at Whatever shares his theory about a fixed quantity of flavor in strawberries of different sizes.
  • Window on Eurasia looks at a contentious plan for a territorial swap between Armenia and Azerbaijan.

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

  • Centauri Dreams notes the remarkable imaging of the atmosphere of HR 8799 e.
  • Crooked Timber starts a discussion about books that, once picked up, turned out to be as good as promised.
  • The Crux considers obsidian, known in the Game of Thrones world as dragonglass.
  • Bruce Dorminey notes that NASA is considering a proposal for a floating Venus probe that would be recharged by microwaves from orbit.</li.
  • The Dragon’s Tales shares a report that Russia has developed a new satellite to work with a new anti-satellite weapons system.
  • Far Outliers notes what U.S. Grant learned from the Mexican-American War, as a strategist and as a politician.
  • L.M. Sacasas at The Frailest Thing suggests, drawing from the image of M87*, that we have had a world disenchanted by the digital technology used to produce the image.
  • JSTOR Daily shares what critical theory has to say about the binge-watching of television.
  • Language Hat notes the Cherokee-language inscriptions on the wall of Manitou Cave.
  • Language Log considers when the first conversing automaton was built.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money takes a look at a corner of 1970s feminism forgotten despite its innovative ideas.
  • Marginal Revolution considers the idea of restricting some new migrants to particular regions of the United States.
  • The NYR Daily explores the important new work by Igiaba Scego, Beyond Babylon.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel answers a surprisingly complex question: What is an electron?
  • Window on Eurasia explains why the cost of a professional military means Russia will not abandon the draft.
  • Arnold Zwicky explores “johnson” as a euphemism for penis.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

  • At Anthro{dendum}, Travis Cooper shares thoughts o what should be kept in mind in studying new media.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes a new plan to catalogue a hundred thousand stellar nurseries in nearby galaxies.
  • Centauri Dreams notes the very unusual lightcurve of the star VVV-WIT-07.
  • D-Brief considers the possible role of climate change in undermining Byzantium.
  • Gizmodo reports on how astronomers managed to directly image exoplanet HR8799e, a young hot Jupiter some 130 light-years away.
  • JSTOR Daily examines the lynchings inflicted on people of Mexican background in the conquered American West after the Mexican-American War.
  • Marginal Revolution considers the possibility that homo sapiens might trace its ancestry to hominid populations in southern Africa.
  • Noahpinion features a guest post from Roy Bahat arguing that Uber and Lyft need to change their treatment of their workers for their own good.
  • The NYR Daily features an article by Zia Haider Rahman talking about the many ways in which British identity has mutated after Brexit.
  • The Planetary Society Blog features some photos taken by the Beresheet probe on its way to the Moon.
  • Drew Rowsome reviews the Greg Scarnici book Dungeons & Drag Queens, a funny take on Fire Island.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes the early Solar System, when a still energetic Mars existed alongside Earth as a life-supporting planet. (Venus, not so much. Perhaps?)
  • Daniel Little writes at Understanding Society about his new book project, a social ontology of government.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how Russia is dropping off sharply in importance as a trading partner for most post-Soviet states.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly writes about the importance of truth in journalism.
  • Crooked Timber looks at the example of Trump and wonders why that kind of charismatic authoritarianism is popular.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to a model of the inner debris disk of HR 8799.
  • Far Outliers looks at the cultural divergences between North and South Koreans.
  • Language Hat looks at the complexities of translating the obscenities of the Marquis de Sade.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money looks at the collapse of unions and makes a limited defense of Castro.
  • Marginal Revolution links to a plan in the United States to make social science research more productive.
  • The NYRB Daily shares Masha Gessen’s article talking about the hard choices she had to make in Putin’s Russia and their relevance to the United States.
  • Window on Eurasia argues that Russia’s Ukrainian policy may be self-destructive.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

  • blogTO writes about the impending installation of snooze stations across Toronto.
  • Centauri Dreams considers the astrobiological implications of stromatolites.
  • D-Brief notes that Titan has methane-flooded canyons.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze looks at the Kepler-444 system and notes studies of HR 8799.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes an assassination attempt against a Donbas leader, and notes dinosaurs probably had colour vision.
  • The Everyday Sociology Blog considers the workplace culture of Amazon.
  • Language Log looks at a mangled translation of South Asian languages into Chinese.
  • The Map Room Blog links to an exhibit on persuasive cartography.
  • The NYRB Daily shares photos of 19th century Rio de Janeiro.
  • Out of Ambit’s Diane Duane shares a recipe for gingerbread.
  • Mark Simpson engages with spornosexuality.
  • Towleroad notes the ill-thought article outing gay Olympic atheltes.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy notes the non-recognition of special sharia rules in American courts for Muslims in family law.
  • Window on Eurasia notes Russia’s problematic military economy, looks at the Russian immigrant community in China, notes the pro-Baltic patriotism of Russophones, and looks at prospects for rapid population fall in Russia.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

  • blogTO notes that craft brewers would like to open their own retail stores in Toronto.
  • Centauri Dreams and The Dragon’s Tales both note that we now have the ability to detect starships travelling at very high fractions of the speed of light.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to a paper further refining the HR 8799 system.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes Egypt’s plan to build a new capital city.
  • The Frailest Thing comments on the philosophical problems associated with the goal of extending life expectancy.
  • Joe. My. God. and Towleroad both note the failure of a Russian bid to prevent the United Nations’ offering of benefits to its married gay staffers.
  • Language Hat notes a Sanskrit humour column.
  • Marginal Revolution links to a study examining the changing nature of the language of World Bank reports.
  • Peter Rukavina notes that on some days, wind power is enough to supply all of Prince Edward Island’s electricity needs.
  • Spacing Toronto continues an ongoing examination of visual pollution.
  • Window on Eurasia notes a Russian interest, pre-Crimea, in emigration.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • blogTO notes that loads of new streetcars should arrive this year for the TTC.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to one paper examining the impact of colliding stellar winds in a close binary on habitable planets, links to another examining how habitable planets gets their water, and wonders about the insights provided by the HR 8799 planetary system into water delivery.
  • The Dragon’s Tales links to a paper arguing that Enceladus’ subsurface ocean is made of alkaline soda water.
  • Joe. My. God. notes a claim by some British scientists that it may be possible, with foreseeable genetic engineering, to create children with two same-sex parents.
  • Languages of the World’s Asya Perelstvaig looks into what Broca’s area of the brain actually means for human language.
  • Marginal Revolution notes that the woman-dominated area of health care is a growth area for middle-class employment in the United States.
  • Otto Pohl notes that yesterday was the 71st anniversary of the deportation of the Chechens and the Ingush.
  • pollotenchegg maps industrial production in Ukraine.
  • Will Baird argues at The Power and the Money that the Minsk Accord is crumbling and examines the reasons for Chinese support of Russia.
  • Spacing Toronto’s John Lorinc worries about corporate sponsorship of ice rinks.
  • Torontoist notes that Massey Hall has begun its renovations.
  • Towleroad notes a Texan legislator who wants to make it illegal for trans people to use public washrooms.
  • Transit Toronto observes that the Union-Pearson Express is undergoing test runs.
  • Window on Eurasia worries about the potential for a minority of Russians in Latvia’s eastern Latgale province to start trouble.