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Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘human beings

[NEWS] Some Wednesday links

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  • Bloomberg talks about Poland’s problems with economic growth, notes that McMansions are poor investments, considers what to do about the Olympics post-Rio, looks at new Japanese tax incentives for working women, looks at a French war museum that put its stock up for sale, examines the power of the New Zealand dairy, looks at the Yasukuni controversies, and notes Huawei’s progress in China.
  • Bloomberg View is hopeful for Brazil, argues demographics are dooming Abenomics, suggests ways for the US to pit Russia versus Iran, looks at Chinese fisheries and the survival of the ocean, notes that high American population growth makes the post-2008 economic recovery relatively less notable, looks at Emperor Akihito’s opposition to Japanese remilitarization, and argues that Europe’s soft response to terrorism is not a weakness.
  • CBC notes that Russian doping whistleblowers fear for their lives, looks at how New Brunswick farmers are adapting to climate change, and looks at how Neanderthals’ lack of facility with tools may have doomed them.
  • The Globe and Mail argues Ontario should imitate Michigan instead of Québec, notes the new Anne of Green Gables series on Netflix, and predicts good things for Tim Horton’s in the Philippines.
  • The Guardian notes that Canada’s impending deal with the European Union is not any model for the United Kingdom.
  • The Inter Press Service looks at child executions in Iran.
  • MacLean’s notes that Great Lakes mayors have joined to challenge a diversion of water from their shared basin.
  • National Geographic looks at the elephant ivory trade, considers the abstract intelligence of birds, considers the Mayan calendar’s complexities, and looks at how the young generation treats Pluto’s dwarf planet status.
  • The National Post notes that VIA Rail is interested in offering a low-cost bus route along the Highway of Tears in northern British Columbia.
  • Open Democracy notes that the last Russian prisoner in Guantanamo does not want to go home, and wonders why the West ignores the Rwandan dictatorship.
  • TVO considers how rural communities can attract immigrants.
  • Universe Today suggests sending our digital selves to the stars, looks at how cirrus clouds kept early Mars warm and wet, and notes the discovery of an early-forming direct-collapse black hole.
  • Variance Explained looks at how Donald Trump’s tweets clearly show two authors at work.
  • The Washignton Post considers what happens when a gay bar becomes a bar with more general appeal.
  • Wired notes that the World Wide Web still is far from achieving its founders’ dreams, looks at how news apps are dying off, and reports on the Univision purchase of Gawker.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

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  • Anthropology.net notes that schizophrenia is not an inheritance from the Neanderthals.
  • D-Brief notes a recent study of nova V1213 Cen that drew on years of observation.
  • Dangerous Minds shares a Simple Minds show from 1979.
  • The Everyday Sociology Blog argues in favour of educating people about how they consume.
  • Far Outliers notes the mid-12th century Puebloan diaspora and the arrival of the Navajo.
  • Marginal Revolution’s Tyler Cowen reports on the Faroe Islands.
  • The Planetary Society Blog notes the impending launch of the OSIRIS-REx probe.
  • Spacing Toronto examines through an interview the idea of artivism.
  • Strange Maps notes the need to update the map of Louisiana.
  • Torontoist introduces its new daily newsletters.
  • Understanding Society examines liberalism’s relationship with hate-based extremism.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that Russians are concerned about their country’s post-Ukraine isolation but not enough to do anything about it, and looks at the generation gap across the former Soviet space.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

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  • At Antipope, Charlie Stross describes how Brexit has forced him to rewrite his latest novel.
  • D-Brief suggests early Venus was once habitable, and notes the rumour of an Earth-like planet found around Proxima Centauri.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze notes the detection of storms of brown dwarfs.
  • The Dragon’s Tales reports on more signs of water on Mars.
  • False Steps notes an early American proposal for a space station in orbit of the Moon.
  • Language Hat talks about lost books, titles deserving broader readership.
  • The LRB Blog talks about the EU and Brexit.
  • Marginal Revolution notes a study suggesting Trump support is concentrated among people close to those who have lost out from trade.
  • Neuroskeptic reports on the story of H.M., a man who lost the ability to form new memories following a brain surgery.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy engages the idea of voting with a lesser evil.
  • Window on Eurasia notes the role of immigrants in Moscow’s economy.

[NEWS] Some Tuesday links

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  • Bloomberg notes a raid of Amazon’s Japan office by that country’s competition agency.
  • Bloomberg View looks at paranoia about Pokémon Go and suggests China is not trying to overturn the world order.
  • CBC reports on the popular music and dance of Brazil’s slums, and reports on the diet of ancient humans.
  • The Inter Press Service notes that African farmers could feed the world, but first they need to work on their infrastructure.
  • MacLean’s shares the images of 25 Canadian websites of note in the days of the early Internet.
  • Open Democracy calls for reform of British agricultural funding and reports on Venezuela’s hard landing.

[NEWS] Some Monday links

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  • Bloomberg notes Amazon’s development of a portal in Japan for Chinese tourists visiting that country, reports on an unexpected decline in Russian manufacturing, and looks at Poland’s conflicts with the European Commission on legal and democratic issues.
  • Bloomberg View notes Trump’s social security plan depends on immigrants, and looks at the geopolitics of the Trans-Pacific Partnership.
  • CBC looks at plans for a greenhouse in a Nunavut town that might bring down the prices for fresh food substantially, and reports on a Brazilian town home to descendants of Southern migrants who are mystified by Trump.
  • The Globe and Mail reports on a South African discovery suggesting ancient hominins practiced burial and reports on a British Columbia judge who threw out the convictions of two people charged with terrorist plots, saying they were entrapped.
  • MacLean’s reports on how transit companies and airlines respond to abusive posts on social media.
  • The National Post reports on the impending return of hundreds of jihadists to the North Caucasus.
  • Open Democracy reports on the state of affairs in Hungary.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

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  • blogTO looks at some of the high points in the Yonge and Eglinton condo boom.
  • D-Brief notes a demonstration in orangutans of some of the traits needed for speech, and language.
  • Centauri Dreams looks at the isolated young star CX330.
  • Dangerous Minds reports on a late 1970s yearbook for Siouxsie and the Banshees.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes that perchlorate salts are all over Mars.
  • The NYRB Daily notes the particular tenor of Chinese nationalism makes it difficult to deal with the South China Sea.
  • Savage Minds starts a discussion about the ethnography of violence.
  • Torontoist carries the guest essay of a Caribana fan who will be giving the festival another try.
  • Window on Eurasia suggests Russia has returned to the stagnation of the pre-Gorbachev 1980s.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell finds, on reanalysis, a positive connection between Brexit support and Austerity.

[NEWS] Some Friday links

  • Bloomberg notes that Brexit may be good for European criminals, looks at the negative impact of Brexit on Japan’s retail chains, examines the way a broken-down road reflects India-China relations, looks at Russia’s shadow economy and observes Ukraine’s effort to attract shippers to its ports.
  • The Globe and Mail notes the mourning in Québec for the Nice attacks.
  • MacLean’s reports on a New Brunswick high school overwhelmed by Syrian refugees and examines the dynamics of Brazil’s wealthy elite.
  • National Geographic notes that Brazil’s capuchin monkeys have progressed to the stone age.
  • The National Post reports on evidence of cannibalism among Neanderthals, notes Kathleen Wynne’s criticism of “All Lives Matter”, and engages with the idea of a guaranteed minimum income.
  • Open Democracy engages with Scotland’s strategy for Brexit.
  • Wired looks at a New York City park built to withstand rising seas, mourns the disappearance of the CD, and notes that scenes of murder will never disappear from our social media.
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