A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘human beings

[BLOG] Some Friday links

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  • blogTO looks at deserted Mirvish Village.
  • Crooked Timber reenages with the Rachel Carson and DDT myth.
  • The Crux looks at the Mandela Effect, exploring false memories.
  • Dangerous Minds makes the case for the musical genius of Bobbie Gentry.
  • From the Heart of Europe’s Nicholas Whyte recounts his visit to Albania’s bunker museum.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes Brazil’s retirement of its only aircraft carrier.
  • The LRB Blog looks at the extent and speed of events in the Trump Administration.
  • Marginal Revolution engages with a book examining France’s carving out a “cultural exception” in international trade agreements.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw reports on the passing of rulership of the Australian micronation of Hutt River.
  • Peter Rukavina shares good advice for visiting museums: visit only what you can take in.
  • Window on Eurasia looks at Russian Orthodox Church opposition to a certain kind of Russian civic nationality, and argues Russia is losing even its regional superpower status.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell reports on how local councils in the United Kingdom are speculating on commercial property.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

  • The Crux makes the case that, for too long, modern homo sapiens have underestimated the genius of the Neanderthals.
  • D-Brief looks at the efforts of some scientists to develop brewing standards for the Moon.
  • Language Hat examines different languages’ writing standards–Turkish, Greek, Armenian–in the late Ottoman Empire.
  • Language Log deconstructs claims that Japanese has no language for curses.
  • Marginal Revolution’s Tyler Cowen looks at the standards of truth by which Trump’s supporters are judging him.
  • The NYRB Daily looks at the hollow Styrofoam aesthetics of the Trump Administration.
  • Savage Minds considers the idea of personhood.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell considers key mechanics of populism.
  • Arnold Zwicky meditates, somewhat pornographically, on a porn star of the last decade and public sexuality.

[LINK] “To Improve Your Sense of Direction, Lose the Technology”

Via the Map Room Blog I came across an article in The New York Times offering advice to people with problems in territories unknown to them. . Speaking as someone who generally does not have troubles with orienting himself, these and the other pieces of advice offered make sense to me: Having an idea as to where are you going, both beforehand in initial planning and at the time when you’re doing whatever you’re doing, helps a lot.

Create a mental map

Review a map of your proposed route before heading out, and perhaps even trace it with your finger, Dr. Brendan Kelley, a neurologist at Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, said in an email. It will help provide context for the route. Once you arrive, review the map and the route you traveled to reinforce the memory of how you got there.

By reviewing a map before your travel, you can take note of “handrails” — landmarks such as bodies of water, stores and streets — that will visually guide you, Ben G. Oliver, the director of outdoor education at Colgate University in Hamilton, N.Y., said in an interview.

Be mindful of place

Stop and enjoy the scenery. Set your phone to vibrate every 15 minutes to remind you to note where you are, Richard S. Citrin, an organizational psychologist from Pittsburgh, said in an email.

Take notes and comment about what you see. That will help orient you and strengthen connections in your brain about where you are and have been.

Try not to get stressed, because that makes it more likely you will become disoriented and confused. “When our automatic responses take over, we usually wind up lost emotionally and sometimes physically,” he said.

Written by Randy McDonald

January 19, 2017 at 5:15 pm

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

  • Anthropology.net looks at the genetics of how the Inuit have adapted to cold weather.
  • ‘Nathan Smith’s Apostrophen shares the author’s plans for the coming year.
  • Beyond the Beyond’s Bruce Sterling shares Margaret Atwood’s commitment to fighting for freedom of expression.
  • Crooked Timber asks its readers for recommendations in Anglophone science fiction.
  • D-Brief notes the discovery of the human mesentery.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze looks at the protoplanetary disk of LkCa 15 disk.
  • Far Outliers looks at some lobsters imported to Japan from (a) Christmas Island.
  • Joe. My. God. notes Janet Jackson has given birth.
  • Language Hat examines the contrast often made between indigenous and immigrant languages.
  • Language Log looks at the names of the stations of the Haifa subway.
  • Steve Munro notes Bathurst Station’s goodbye to Honest Ed’s.
  • The Planetary Society Blog examines the Dawn probe’s discoveries at Ceres in the past year.
  • Window on Eurasia looks at how the permafrost of the Russian far north is melting and endangering entire cities, and contrasts the prosperity of the Estonian city of Narva relative to the decay of adjacent Ivangorod.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly writes about the importance of showing up for major events.
  • Crooked Timber looks at e-publishing for academia.
  • Dead Things notes that the evolution of the human brain and human teeth were not linked.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to two papers about ocean worlds and greenhouse effects.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money looks at the hopeful seasteaders of French Polynesia.
  • Towleroad looks at the life of a trans man in the mid-20th century.
  • Window on Eurasia shares a Catalonian linguists’ argument that linguistic diversity helps minority languages.
  • Arnold Zwicky reflects on the gay cowboy scene.

[LINK] “Neanderthals On A Boat”

Anthropology.net’s Kambiz Kamrani reports on an exciting archeological finding from the Aegean, suggesting that Neanderthals or a different hominid population managed to reach the Greek islands.

Mousterian spearheads, a classic Neanderthal tool type, were excavated from the Stelida archeological site on the Greek island of Naxos by from McMaster University. There has been a long time belief that the first people to colonize this particular region were early farmers who arrived by boat approximately 9,000 years ago. These artifacts imply something much much different as they could be 250,000 years old. Archaeologist, Tristan Carter, co-director, comments on the these artifacts,

““The stone tools they were finding on the site looked nothing like the stone tools that had ever been found before on prehistoric sites in the Cycladic Islands.””

The Mousterian culture is Paleolithic. And these spear heads furnish evidence that humans reached the islands of the Aegean Sea a quarter million years ago and maybe earlier. If confirmed, it means the first people on Naxos were Neanderthals, or their probable ancestors, Homo heidelbergensis or maybe even Homo erectus. But how did they get there -Could these archaic hominins have travelled by boat?

Written by Randy McDonald

January 2, 2017 at 8:30 pm

[BLOG] Some Monday links

  • Anthropology.net looks at archeological findings revealing what people ate in the area of the Levant 780 thousand years ago.
  • D-Brief notes Amazon’s patenting of mothership and drone technology.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to a paper looking at how quickly hot Jupiters lose their atmospheres.
  • Far Outliers notes the numerology of 1979.
  • Language Hat links to an essay by a writer of Chinese origin talking about what it means to abandon writing in one’s native language.
  • Language Log looks at European Union English’s latest definitions.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money argues in favour of holding corporations responsible for their supply chains, worldwide.
  • Marginal Revolution notes a San Francisco restaurant that serves food on Ipads.
  • Steve Munro calculates the effect of uneven headways on TTC bus routes.
  • Neuroskeptic notes that creationists who claim Charles Darwin contributed to the extinction of Tasmanian Aborigines appear to be lying.
  • The NYRB Daily reports on an exhibition of the abstract art of Carmen Herrera.
  • Towleroad notes an effort to recreate the sounds of 18th century Paris.
  • Transit Toronto notes higher TTC prices.
  • Window on Eurasia suggests Putin’s regime is increasingly totalitarian, argues the lessons some Russians take from stardom is that reforms lead to revolution, and notes Tatarstan’s being hauled back into line.
  • Arnold Zwicky pays tribute to departed soc.motsser Harold Arthur Faye.