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Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘human beings

[BLOG] Some Monday links

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  • James Bow notes, by way of explaining new fiction he is writing, why a Mercury colony makes sense.
  • JSTOR Daily notes the life of Anita Brenner, a Mexican-born American Jewish writer who helped connect the two North American neighbours.
  • Far Outliers’ Joel notes the cautious approach of the United States towards famine relief in the young Soviet Union in 1922.
  • The Frailest Thing’s Michael Sacasas shares a brief Lewis Mumford quote, talking about how men became mechanical in spirit before they invented complex machines.
  • Hornet Stories celebrates the many ways in which the movie Addams Family Values is queer.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money considers the idea of what “thoughtfulness” means in relation to Senator Al Franken.
  • The Map Room Blog shares a few more fantasy map generators.
  • The NYR Daily considers the thoughtful stamp art of Vincent Sardon.
  • Progressive Download’s John Farrell recommends Adam Rutherford’s new book, A Brief History of Everyone Who Ever Lived, on genomics and history.
  • Towleroad notes that Demi Levato took trans Virginian politician Danica Roem her to the American Music Awards.
  • Window on Eurasia shares a Tatar cleric’s speculation that Russia’s undermining of the Tatar language in education might push Tatars away from Russia.
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[BLOG] Some Monday links

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  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly takes a look at the concept of resilience.
  • D-Brief notes the many ways in which human beings can be killed by heat waves.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze notes a claim for the discovery of a new pulsar planet, PSR B0329+54 b, two Earth masses with an orbit three decades long.
  • The Frailest Thing’s Michael Sacasas argues that, in some was, online connectivity is like a drug.
  • Hornet Stories considers the plight of bisexuals in the closet.
  • Language Hat considers the origins of the family name of Hungarian Karl-Maria Kertbeny, the man who developed the term “homosexuality”, and much else besides.
  • The NYR Daily looks at how the item of soap was a key component behind racism and apartheid in South Africa.
  • Progressive Download’s John Farrell notes a new book, The Quotable Darwin.
  • Peter Rukavina takes a look at 18 years’ worth of links on his blog. How many are still good? The answer may surprise you.
  • Understanding Society considers the insights of Tony Judt on the psychology of Europeans after the Second World War.
  • John Scalzi at Whatever considers, in Q&A format, some insights for men in the post-Weinstein era.
  • Window on Eurasia looks at how boundaries in the Caucasus were not necessarily defined entirely by the Bolsheviks.
  • Arnold Zwicky considers various odd appearances of pickles in contemporary popular culture.

[NEWS] Six notes about science: birds, Julie Payette, agriculture, wood in space, Enceladus, minds

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  • Can parrots, capable of speech, be witnesses in criminal cases? Maybe. Atlas Obscura reports.
  • Julie Payette’s speech in defense of science, regarding climate change and the like, might well have been a bit more politic. (Maybe.) MacLean’s looks at the controversy.
  • Was sedentary agricultural civilization a mistake, as some suggest? The New Republic reports on the state of the debate.
  • Scientific American reports on the United States’ 1960s probes Ranger 3 through 5, built partly of wood.
  • Universe Today notes a new model suggesting that a porous rocky core could help Enceladus keep a liquid water ocean for billions of years.
  • The Walrus reports on how two conjoined twins, who seem to have access to each other’s consciousness, are proving very interesting theories of mind.

[NEWS] Four science and technology links: Internet, Neanderthals, dinosaurs, global warming

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  • AndrĂ© Staltz argues the triumvirate of Google, Facebook, and Amazon is ending the free Internet.
  • Sarah Kaplan notes research suggesting Neanderthals were outmatched not by human capabilities so much as by numbers.
  • VICE notes a study looking at exactly how, 65 million years ago, triggered a mass extinction ending the dinosaurs.
  • Heat records for summers around the world are set to be shattered, thanks to global warming.

[NEWS] Four science and technology links: Quayside, Wattpad, disasters, transhumanism

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  • We’ve got more data on the impending Google investments in the emergent Toronto neighbourhood of Quayside. The Toronto Star reports.
  • Tencent has just invested $C 40 million in Toronto online fiction startup Wattpad. The Globe and Mail reports.
  • Canadian cities are starting to integrate nature into their defense planning against natural disasters. The Globe and Mail reports.
  • Tim Adams visits a transhumanist fair in Texas and considers what the future bodes for the modification of humanity. HIs article is in the Observer.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

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  • Anthropology.net looks at Adam Rutherford’s new book A Brief History of Everyone Who Ever Lived, about the human family tree.
  • Crooked Timber argues that secret British government reports on Brexit really should be leaked.
  • The Frailest Thing’s Michael Sacasas argues that the concept of “Luddites” deserves to be revisited.
  • Language Hat takes a look at the potential for emojis to overwhelm Unicode, as does Language Log.
  • The LRB Blog reports on some astounding jokes about sexual assault made on British television.
  • The Planetary Society Blog explores the state of the search for Planet Nine.
  • Roads and Kingdoms takes a look on the people who live in one of Manila’s largest cemeteries.
  • Drew Rowsome quite likes God’s Own Country, a British film that tells the story of two gay farmers in love.
  • Starts With a Bang’s Ethan Siegel examines why the gravitational wave of GW170817 arrived 1.7 seconds before the light.
  • Mark Simpson takes issue with the recent study suggesting sexual orientations could be determined from profile pics.
  • Strange Company tells of how a ghost hunter had a terrible time trying to track down one supposed haunter.
  • Strange Maps notes an 1864 map of the United States imagining a future country divided into four successor states.
  • Understanding Society takes a look at a recent study of the position of small farmers in India.
  • Window on Eurasia suggests that the economic role of immigrants in Russia is critical, to the tune of 10% of GDP.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

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  • Anthropology.net notes that interbreeding with Neanderthals restored ancient hominin DNA to homo sapiens.
  • Centauri Dreams looks at signs of planetary formation in cometary rings.
  • Bruce Dorminey notes a theory that advanced extraterrestrial civilizations could manipulate pulsars as beacons.
  • Hornet Stories explains what “intersex” means.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money considers the perhaps baffling appeal of Florida real estate at a time of climate change.
  • The LRB Blog considers the radical potential of asteroid mining. Could it help free us from resource scarcity? How should we manage it?
  • Marginal Revolution shares an argument that humans, through transporting life, are increasing biodiversity.
  • The NYR Daily argues that China has too many illusions over its “New Silk Road” initiatives.
  • Peter Rukavina examines the changing shades of green used by GO Transit.
  • Drew Rowsome really likes Toronto musical Bat Out of Hell.
  • Window on Eurasia looks at how different non-Russian languages are present on the streets of St. Petersburg.