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Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘human beings

[DM] “On the idea that the human life expectancy is limited to 115 years”

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At Demography Matters, I blog about the idea that the human life expectancy might be limited to 115 years.

Even if this is the case for the foreseeable future, I argue that there’s still much that can be done to make sure we reach this limit and that life to this limit is as healthy as possible.

Written by Randy McDonald

October 21, 2016 at 11:59 pm

[BLOG] Some Friday links

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  • Beyond the Beyond quotes a Vladimir Putin statement on geopolitics.
  • blogTO shares photos from Yorkdale’s expansion.
  • Centauri Dreams looks at more evidence for Planet Nine.
  • Dead Things notes evidence that right-handedness has been predominant among hominins for some time.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze reports on the discovery of three hot Jupiters.
  • Marginal Revolution looks at the Philippines’ shift towards China.
  • The Planetary Society Weblog looks at ExoMars’ mission and the failure of the Schiaparelli lander.
  • Torontoist notes that the Ontario Teachers’ Pension Plan has bought Constellation Wineries, making some Canadian wineries Canadian-owned again.
  • Towleroad reports on a Europe-wide census of LGBT identities.
  • Whatever’s John Scalzi notes that Hillary Clinton is winning because she puts work into it.
  • Window on Eurasia looks at Putin’s changing style of governance.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

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  • blogTO shares the new face of the Broadview Hotel.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly writes about the joys of the unscreened life.
  • Dead Things reports on a study suggesting that although humans are violent by the standards of mammals, we are among the least violent primates.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze reports on the discovery of five sizable planets orbiting HIP 41378.
  • Language Log reports on the perils of 7 and 9 in Cantonese.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money considers the usefulness of The Battle of Algiers.
  • The Planetary Society Blog reacts to the Elon Musk proposal for colonizing Mars.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer responds briefly to the question of what Mexico can do about Trump.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how the Russian invasion of Ukraine has spurred new arms purchases throughout the eastern half of Europe, even in Belarus.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

  • The Big Picture shares photos of motorbike racing in South Africa.
  • Centauri Dreams considers the stellar weather that planets of red dwarf stars might encounter.
  • Dead Things looks at two genetic studies which complicate the narrative of humanity’s spread.
  • Dangerous Minds shares the infamous anti-disco night of 1979 that spelled the end of the genre in North America.
  • The Everyday Sociology Blog considers how one makes a home among strangers.
  • Joe. My. God. notes that the UKIP MP claims the sun is responsible for the bulk of the Earth’s tides not the moon, and reports on a Kentucky judge who says gays ruined straight men’s ability to hug.
  • Language Log looks at changing patterns of language usage in Japanese.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money mocks the cosmic perspective of Gary Johnson.
  • The LRB Blog reports from devastated Lesbos.
  • Maximos62 maps the smoke from this year’s Indonesian fires.
  • The NYRB Daily shares vintage photos from mid-1960s Cuba.
  • The Planetary Society Blog reports on a recent tour of NASA facilities.
  • Window on Eurasia reports on a call for a single Circassian alphabet, suggests a Russian initiative to use sufism to unite Russian Muslims will end badly, and argues that Russian criticism of language policy in post-Soviet countries is linked to geopolitics.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • Anthropology.net deals with the use of technology to save endangered languages.
  • At the Broadside Blog, Caitlin Kelly starts off a discussion of high school by starting with The Breakfast Club.
  • Dangerous Minds shares video of a very early performance by the Police.
  • The Frailest Thing engages with the idea and importance of memory.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes Rod Dreher’s anti-refugee stance.
  • The Map Room Blog looks at the new Atlas Obscura book.
  • The Planetary Society Weblog takes a rocket roadtrip.
  • Savage Minds considers the importance of decolonization.
  • Torontoist notes a Toronto Sun editorial in favour of Rail Deck Park.
  • Understanding Society considers the international measurement of happiness.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy argues that Gary Johnson is good for Hillary.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

  • blogTO notes the 1970s, when Yonge around Queen was under reconstruction.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly talks about her writing life in New York City.
  • The Crux considers: Neandertal or Neanderthal?
  • Dangerous Minds notes the new Laibach app.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze looks at evaporating hot Jupiter HD 209458b.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes Russia’s planned reduction of its crew on the International Space Station.
  • Joe. My. God. notes the reactions of the Trump camp to Hillary’s alt-right speech.
  • Language Hat links to a paper examining the transition from classical to modern Arabic.
  • Marginal Revolution considers the economics of durable art.
  • The Russian Demographics Blog looks at post-Soviet patterns of migration and examines the ethnic composition of Georgia circa 1926.
  • Une heure de peine reports on a new French series on sociology in comic book format.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy considers the legal question of a head transplant.
  • Window on Eurasia notes the violent rivalries of the two Donbas republics and looks at a refugee-prompted restricted movement zone on Russia’s frontier with Norway.

[NEWS] Some Wednesday links

  • Bloomberg talks about Poland’s problems with economic growth, notes that McMansions are poor investments, considers what to do about the Olympics post-Rio, looks at new Japanese tax incentives for working women, looks at a French war museum that put its stock up for sale, examines the power of the New Zealand dairy, looks at the Yasukuni controversies, and notes Huawei’s progress in China.
  • Bloomberg View is hopeful for Brazil, argues demographics are dooming Abenomics, suggests ways for the US to pit Russia versus Iran, looks at Chinese fisheries and the survival of the ocean, notes that high American population growth makes the post-2008 economic recovery relatively less notable, looks at Emperor Akihito’s opposition to Japanese remilitarization, and argues that Europe’s soft response to terrorism is not a weakness.
  • CBC notes that Russian doping whistleblowers fear for their lives, looks at how New Brunswick farmers are adapting to climate change, and looks at how Neanderthals’ lack of facility with tools may have doomed them.
  • The Globe and Mail argues Ontario should imitate Michigan instead of Québec, notes the new Anne of Green Gables series on Netflix, and predicts good things for Tim Horton’s in the Philippines.
  • The Guardian notes that Canada’s impending deal with the European Union is not any model for the United Kingdom.
  • The Inter Press Service looks at child executions in Iran.
  • MacLean’s notes that Great Lakes mayors have joined to challenge a diversion of water from their shared basin.
  • National Geographic looks at the elephant ivory trade, considers the abstract intelligence of birds, considers the Mayan calendar’s complexities, and looks at how the young generation treats Pluto’s dwarf planet status.
  • The National Post notes that VIA Rail is interested in offering a low-cost bus route along the Highway of Tears in northern British Columbia.
  • Open Democracy notes that the last Russian prisoner in Guantanamo does not want to go home, and wonders why the West ignores the Rwandan dictatorship.
  • TVO considers how rural communities can attract immigrants.
  • Universe Today suggests sending our digital selves to the stars, looks at how cirrus clouds kept early Mars warm and wet, and notes the discovery of an early-forming direct-collapse black hole.
  • Variance Explained looks at how Donald Trump’s tweets clearly show two authors at work.
  • The Washignton Post considers what happens when a gay bar becomes a bar with more general appeal.
  • Wired notes that the World Wide Web still is far from achieving its founders’ dreams, looks at how news apps are dying off, and reports on the Univision purchase of Gawker.