A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘human beings

[NEWS] Four links about problematic history: swastika, Cornwallis River, castle restoration, humans

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  • MacLean’s argues that, in Canada and arguably the West generally, it is much too soon to rehabilitate the swastika.
  • Global News reports on a proposal to rename Nova Scotia’s Cornwallis River.
  • This effort to engage in a minimalist, non-misleading restoration of a Spanish castle is controversial.
  • The argument that human history goes back millions of years, and encompass a huger area than thought, is compelling.
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[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

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  • Acts of Minor Treason’s Andrew Barton reacts to the series premiere of Orville, finding it oddly retrograde and unoriginal.
  • Centauri Dreams shares Larry Klaes’ article considering the impact of the 1956 classic Forbidden Planet on science and science fiction alike.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to a paper wondering if it is by chance that Earth orbits a yellow dwarf, not a dimmer star.
  • Drone360 shares a stunning video of a drone flying into Hurricane Irma.
  • Hornet Stories celebrates the 10th anniversary of Chris Crocker’s “Leave Britney Alone!” video. (It was important.)
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money wonders if 16 years are long enough to let people move beyond taboo images, like those of the jumpers.
  • The LRB Blog takes a look at the young Dreamers, students, who have been left scrambling by the repeal of DACA.
  • The Map Room Blog notes how a Québec plan to name islands in the north created by hydro flooding after literature got complicated by issues of ethnicity and language.
  • Marginal Revolution notes the rise of internal tourism in China, and soon, of Chinese tourists in the wider world.
  • The NYR Daily has an interview arguing that the tendency to make consciousness aphysical or inexplicable is harmful to proper study.
  • Roads and Kingdoms has a brief account of a good experience with Indonesian wine.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell links to five reports about Syria. They are grim reading.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

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  • Centauri Dreams notes one source suggesting red dwarf stars may produce too little ultraviolet to spark life on their planets.
  • Hornet Stories notes how LGBTQ Dreamers will be hit badly by the repeal of DACA.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money approves of Frederick Crews’ critical takedown of Freud as a scientist.
  • The LRB Blog looks at a new South Korean film examining the Gwangju massacre of 1980.
  • The NYR Daily notes that China seems set to head into a new era of strict censorship, with calamitous results.
  • The Planetary Society Blog considers the 40th anniversary of the Voyagers in the light of the Pale Blue Dot of Carl Sagan.
  • The Signal reports that, for archivists’ purposes, online newspaper sites are actually very poorly organized.
  • At Spacing, Adam Bunch notes how Upper Canadian governor John Simcoe’s abolition of slavery was not quite that.
  • Window on Eurasia notes the continued official contortions around Circassian history in Russia.

[NEWS] Four LGBTQ links, from psychological issues to gay-friendly Muslims to Chechen refugees

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  • At VICE, Tayte Hanson writes about his experience suffering from body dysmorphia in the gay porn industry.
  • Jeff Leavell, also at VICE, writes compassionately about the gay bar patrons he’s seen who have self-medicated much too much.
  • This older Jezebel post, noting shared circumstances made US Muslims more gay-friendly than evangelicals, matters.
  • The latest John Ibbitson article looks at how LGBTQ Chechen refugees in Canada need continued support in their new home.

Written by Randy McDonald

September 5, 2017 at 8:15 pm

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

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  • At Anthrodendum, P. Kerim Friedman talks about the technologies he uses to help him navigate Chinese-speaking Taiwan.
  • Dead Things notes new dating showing the Neanderthals of Vindija cave, in Croatia, were much older than thought.
  • Far Outliers takes a brief look at the history of Temasek, the Malay polity that once thrived in Singapore.
  • Hornet Stories shares photos from New York City’s Afropunk festival.
  • Imageo shows the scale of the devastating wildfires in the western United States, with satellite photos.
  • Language Hat looks at the sort of mistakes characteristic of medieval manuscripts written in Latin and Greek.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money looks at Trump’s revocation of DACA and the harm that will face the Dreamers. I am so sorry.
  • Maximos62 looks at a new book examining how biologists, including Darwin and Wallace, came to draw a borer between Asia and Australia.
  • Peter Rukavina blogs about his visit to Wheatley River’s Island Honey Wine Company. (Mead, it seems.)
  • Strange Company takes a look at the life of violent war-mongering British eccentric Alfred Wintle.
  • Window on Eurasia notes the very poor state of sex education in Russia’s education system.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

  • Anthrodendum’s Alex Golub talks about anthropologists of the 20th century who resisted fascism.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes a study suggesting the TRAPPIST-1 system might be substantially older than our own solar system.
  • Centauri Dreams considers tidal locking as a factor relevant to Earth-like planetary environments.
  • The Crux shows efforts to help the piping plover in its home on the dunes of the Great Lakes coast of Pennsylvania.
  • Dead Things considers the evidence for the presence of modern humans in Sumatra 73 thousand years ago.
  • Bruce Dorminey makes the case for placing a lunar base not on the poles, but rather in the material-rich nearside highlands.
  • Far Outliers shares some evocative placenames from Japan, like Togakushi (‘door-hiding’) from ninja training spaces.
  • Language Hat notes the exceptionally stylistically uneven Spanish translation of the Harry Potter series.
  • Language Log thinks, among other things, modern technologies make language learning easier than ever before.
  • The LRB Blog notes how claims to trace modern Greece directly to the Mycenaean era are used to justify ultranationalism.
  • Marginal Revolution considers which countries are surrounded by enemies. (India rates poorly by this metric.)
  • The Numerati’s Stephen Baker considers how Confederate statues are products of recycling, like so much in our lives.
  • The NYR Daily considers the unique importance of Thomas Jefferson, a man at once statesman and slaver.
  • The Planetary Society Blog celebrated the 40th anniversary of the launch of Voyager 2 Sunday.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer notes that, for a country fighting a drug war, Mexico spends astonishingly little on its police force.
  • Drew Rowsome takes a look at classic John Wayne Western, The Train Robbers.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel considers the critical role of NASA’s Planetary Protection Officer.
  • Strange Company notes the many legends surrounding the early 19th century US’ Theodosia Burr.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy hosts Ilya Somin’ argument against world government, as something limiting of freedom. Thoughts?
  • Window on Eurasia notes how Ukrainians are turning from Russia, becoming more foreign to their one-time partner.

[NEWS] Four links about science and the future: Caananites, iPod, birding, e-residency

  • The New York Times is but one news source to observe the findings of archeologists and geneticists that the Canaanites were not slaughtered. Was the claimed Biblical genocide a matter of thwarted wish-fulfillment?
  • At Wired, David Pierce mourns the standalone iPod, an innovative music-changing technology in its time now being phased out.
  • Catherine McIntyre at MacLean’s describes how birding is becoming hip among young urbanites, in Toronto and across Canada.
  • Open Democracy looks at how Estonia is pioneering e-residency and virtual citizenship schemes.