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Posts Tagged ‘humour

[NEWS] Twelve 2018 Ontario general election links (#onpoli, #elxn2018)

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  • John Lorinc at Spacing takes a look at Ontario’s “crazy-ass” election and warns about what a Ford government might do, based on Toronto precedents.
  • blogTO reports on a house on Dupont at Franklin, in the Junction Triangle, that has a fantastic political lawn sign display.
  • “General Zod for Ontario Premier”, indeed. The National Post reports on some imaginative signage.
  • Mitch Potter reports from Egansville, a small town in the Ottawa Valley in eastern Ontario, to look at some of the causes of Ford’s strength there.
  • Peter Biesterfeld at NOW Toronto reports on the fear of many that Doug Ford could be an even worse version of Mike Harris.
  • Robyn Urback suggests that, had the Liberals under Wynne tried to position themselves as thoroughly centrist, they might have had a chance. CBC has it.
  • Rob Salerno wonders at Daily Xtra if the unpopularity of Kathleen Wynne, a politician whose policies are popular and being substantially copied by rivals, has anything to do with homophobia.
  • Will Kathleen Wynne be able to keep her riding of Don Valley North? The jury is still out there. The Toronto Star reports.
  • The riding of Guelph may well be where the Green Party of Ontario will elect its first MPP. The Toronto Star reports.
  • Meagan Campbell takes a look at Andrea Horvath, and her journey from working-class Hamilton to NDP leadership and perhaps beyond, over at MacLean’s.
  • Tim Harper takes a look, two decades later, at the controversial NDP government of Bob Rae. Does it still cast as much of a shadow over Ontario? The Toronto Star has it.
  • Steve Munro takes a look at the idea of uploading the Toronto subway system to Metrolinx, and at the many ways this Doug Ford proposal would make things terribly complicated.
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[CAT] Five cats links: facial expressions, Ugandan lions, Chinese leopard cats, dreams, Disneyland

  • Seriously Science notes that, of course, cats do have facial expressions. It’s just a matter of learning to recognize them.
  • This sad story of the poisoning of lion cubs in a Ugandan park, product of growing conflict between farmers and wildlife, needs to be shared. National Geographic reports.
  • Hopeful rescuers of the leopard cats of China, wild animals though they look quite like housecats, should stop and not risk separating kittens from their mothers. National Geographic reports.
  • At the Chronicle of Higher Education’s Lingua Franca, Allan Metcalfe shares, Caedmon-like, what he remembers of a dream he had of cats and their words.
  • Aine Cain at Business Insider tells the story, and shares the photos, of the feral cats who have been invited into Disneyland to make that theme park their home.

Written by Randy McDonald

April 21, 2018 at 1:00 pm

[ISL] Five islands links: Malta, East Timor, Choctaw, Ireland, April Fool’s Day

  • Malta, it seems from this New Statesman take, is facing serious problems of corruption through its role in international finance.
  • The establishment of a new maritime border between Australia and East Timor threatens Australia’s borders with adjacent Indonesia. ABC reports.
  • Ireland has established a scholarship program for Choctaw students as a sign of thanks for Choctaw aid during the Irish Potato Famine. The Irish Post reports.
  • This Slugger O’Toole article suggests that the disparity in living standards and income between the Republic and Northern Ireland is not nearly so vast as GDP would suggest.
  • The Map Room Blog shared this Ordinance Survey’s April Fool’s Day joke, of a fake but realistic island.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

  • Centauri Dreams shares a proposal for unmanned probe missions to future incoming extrasolar asteroids like ‘Oumuamua.
  • The Crux considers, in the context of recent (perhaps surprising) context, how scientists will one day record dreams.
  • Hornet Stories shares the report on a poll of younger gay people about the idea of monogamous relations versus open ones, suggesting there are signs a strong preference for monogamy isn’t well thought out.
  • Imageo notes that global warming, by leading to the breakup of icecaps, will worsen the sea ice hazard to maritime shipping.
  • JSTOR Daily notes how social workers are called to support serious social reform.
  • Language Hat notes a monument to the Cyrillic alphabet erected in Antarctica by Bulgarians.
  • In the era of Trump, Lingua Franca takes a look at the origin of the phrase “useful idiots”.
  • Marginal Revolution notes a recent article observing the decline of German cuisine in the United States. Who, or what, will save it?
  • At the Planetary Society Blog, Emily Lakdawalla talks about the latest exciting discoveries from Titan, including the odd distribution of nitrogen in its atmosphere and surface.
  • Towleroad notes how the discomfort of Ben Carson with transgender people leads him to consider the needs of homeless transgender people as secondary to this discomfort.
  • Window on Eurasia suggests that Cossacks in Russia are close to gaining recognition as a separate people.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell suggests–jokes?–that intellectual history from 1900 can be explained substantially in terms of the uncritical adoption of a nomad science, starting from race science and continuing to today with Harry Potter.
  • Arnold Zwicky shares a post reporting on a PhD student’s thesis, studying features of Chicano English.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • Kambiz at Anthropology.net notes evidence that Neanderthals in Italy used fire to shape digging sticks 170 thousand years ago.
  • Missing persons blog Charley Ross reminds online commentators to be careful and reasonable in their speculations online, if only because these last forever.
  • D-Brief notes a new study of the TRAPPIST-1 system suggesting that its outermost planets, in the circumstellar habitable zone, are so low density that they must have abundant volatiles. Water is the most likely candidate.
  • Hornet Stories introduces readers to the impressive photography of New York City’s Peter Hujar.
  • At In Media Res, Russell Arben Fox meditates on the issues of friendship in the contemporary world.
  • Joe. My. God. shares representative Tammy Duckworth’s mockery of the authoritarian Donald Trump, aka “Cadet Bone Spurs”.
  • JSTOR Daily notes the continuing importance of the films of Rainer Werner Fassbinder.
  • The Map Room Blog notes that someone has made cute maps of seven solar system worlds for children.
  • Marginal Revolution links to an article looking at how some of the schoolgirls abducted in Nigeria by Boko Haram are doing.
  • The NYR Daily engages with “Soul of a Nation”, a touring exhibit of African-American art in the era of Black Power.
  • The Planetary Society Blog reports from the scene of the impending Falcon Heavy launch, sharing photos.
  • Towleroad notes a South African church that not only beats its queer parishoners but fines them, too.
  • Window on Eurasia suggests</u. Western sanctions could hinder the Russian development of its Arctic presence.

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

  • Eddie Chong at anthro{dendum} shares a listing of anthropology-relevant links from around the blogosphere.
  • The Everyday Sociology Blog takes a quick look at the sociology of food.
  • Joe. My. God. notes that a court ruling making same-sex marriage imaginable has helped an evangelical Christian candidate leap to the front of Costa Rica’s presidential elections.
  • JSTOR Daily explains the import of President’s Day to, among others, non-Americans.
  • Language Hat examines the spelling of the Irish word “imbolc” or “imbolg”, used to describe a festival marking the start of spring.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money calls for legal enforcement of supply chains for minerals and the like, to ensure that they were not produce through human exploitation (for instance).
  • Miranda Vane at the LRB Blog introduces her readers to the northern English sport of Cumberland & Westmorland Wrestling.
  • Marginal Revolution highlights the argument of a commenter who argued that self-driving trucks cannot perform on themselves the tasks that human truckers are expected to. (Yet?)
  • The NYR Daily examines the transformation of Putin in office from mere oligarch to the world’s leading kleptocrat.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw celebrates a new Australian satirical newssite, the Betoota Advocate.
  • At the Planetary Society Blog, Emily Lakdawalla notes new findings suggesting some Kuiper belt objects have huge moons, relatively and absolutely.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes that while a powerful laser cannot rip up space literally, it can do pretty remarkable things nonetheless.
  • Towleroad shares an essay by Cyd Ziegler talking about the importance of gay Atlantis Cruise ships for him, in the light of a scandal onboard a ship involving a fatal drug overdose.
  • Arnold Zwicky looks at, among other things, tulip trees and magnolias.

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly talks about a week of her life as a freelance writer, highlighting so much of her work relates to social connections as opposed to actual writing.
  • The Frailest Thing’s Michael Sacasas shares an astonishingly prescient take by E.B. White on the power of television from 1938.
  • Hornet Stories notes the efforts of the Indonesian government to get the Google Play Store there to block 70 apps used by LGBT people.
  • At In a State of Migration, Lyman Stone looks at demographic trends in Hawaii, the other major insular possession of the United States. Low fertility and a high cost of living may actually lead to population decline there, too, in the foreseeable future.
  • Joe. My. God. notes the death, at 59, of trailblazing gay comedian Bob Smith.
  • JSTOR Daily links/u> to a paper noting how Jewish resistance in the Warsaw Uprising played a critical role in shaping post-war Jewish identity.
  • Towleroad notes the announcement of an astonishingly preserved 1945 film clip showing gay men, out, at a pool party in 1945 Missouri.
  • Window on Eurasia notes one prominent Donbas separatists’ push for an aggressive response to the Ukrainian government over the collapse of Minsk, including an attempt to reclaim the remainder of Donetsk and Luhansk oblasts from Kyiv.