A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘hyperion

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly writes about eight of her favourite places, most but not all still around for others to enjoy.
  • Centauri Dreams responds to the vast ancient proto-supercluster Hyperion, dating to a point in time just 2.3 billion years after the Big Bang.
  • The Crux considers the advent of light in the very early universe, with the emergence of the first supermassive stars just a few hundred million years after the Big Bang.
  • D-Brief notes the discovery of the youngest pulsar yet found in our galaxy, Kes 75 just 19 thousand light-years away and five hundred years old.
  • JSTOR Daily takes a look at the history of explorer James Cook’s ship, the HMS Endeavour.
  • Tyler Cowen at Marginal Revolution links to his latest Bloomberg View column about Saudi Arabia, about how the very weakness of the Saudi state makes Saudi Arabia appeal to the United States as a partner in a way that a solider Iran cannot.
  • Matthew Phelan at the NYR Daily writes about the menace of ecofascism, of a sort of localist environmentalism that crosses over into nationalism and even militant xenophobia.
  • Emily Lakdawalla at the Planetary Society Blog shares images of the newly-launched BepiColombo probe to Mercury, including some selfies.
  • Drew Rowsome reports on A Night at the Bronze, a live version of the fame Buffy episode “Once More With Feeling” that will be staged Hallowe’en night at Buddies in Bad Times.
  • Strange Company reports on the mysterious 1910 murder of actor Weldon Atherstone.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how Moldova’s Orthodox Christians are torn between rival national churches based in Romania and Russia.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

  • Bad Astronomy shares an image of Hyperion, a proto-supercluster of galaxies literally jawdropping in scope.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly asks an interesting question: Who is your rock, your support? Who is your gravel?
  • Centauri Dreams notes a new paper suggesting a way to determine the size of undetected planets from the sorts of dust that they create.
  • Crooked Timber notes the obvious, that neither China nor the United States would win in a war in the South China Sea.
  • D-Brief ,a href=”http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/d-brief/2018/10/16/ganymede-moon-jupiter-world-tectonic-faults/”>notes that Ganymede, the largest moon of Jupiter and in the solar system, has tectonic faults in its icy crust.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes that Russia is interested in cooperating with India in space travel.
  • David Finger at The Finger Post reports on his search for a Philly cheese steak sandwich in Philadelphia.
  • L.M. Sacasas at The Frailest Thing considers the way in which modern social networking creates a totalitarianism, enlisting people through games into supporting its edifice.
  • Joe. My. God. notes that Thailand is preparing to legalize civil unions for same-sex couples.
  • JSTOR Daily notes the 19th century heyday of “mummy brown”, a paint pigment used by artists made of ground-up Egyptian mummies.
  • Language Log notes that the expression “add oil”, originally from Chinese slang, is now in the OED.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes how the lies of Facebook about the popularity on online video dealt a terrible blow to journalism.
  • Lingua Franca examines how the word “smarmy” came about and spread.
  • Marginal Revolution notes the exceptional generosity of actor Chow Yun Fat, who is giving away his vast estate.
  • Hugh Eakin at the NYR Daily takes a look at the role of the United States in mounting repression in Saudi Arabia, symbolized by the Khashoggi killing.
  • Marc Rayman at the Planetary Society Blog looks at the achievements of the Dawn probe, at Ceres and Vesta and the points in between, on this its 11th anniversary.
  • Roads and Kingdoms shares a photo essay looking at the difficult treks of the Rohingya as they are forced to scavenge firewood from a local forest.
  • Drew Rowsome takes a look at the homoerotic photography of James Critchley.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel looks at what it was likely, in the early universe, when starlight became visible for the first time.
  • Frank Jacobs at Strange Maps debunks a map purporting to show post-Fukushima contamination of the entire Pacific, and has it with false and discouraging apocalyptic maps generally.
  • Window on Eurasia takes a look at the deep divide between the Russian and Ukrainian nations.