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Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘ice giants

[BLOG] Some Monday links

  • Bad Astronomy’s Phil Plait shares Johannes Kroeger’s image of the median Earth.
  • The Crux considers when human societies began to accumulate large numbers of aged people. Would there have been octogenarians in any Stone Age cultures, for instance?
  • The Dragon’s Tales considers Russia’s strategy in Southeast Asia.
  • Alexandra Samuel at JSTOR Daily notes that one way to fight against fake news is for people to broaden their friends networks beyond their ideological sympathizers.
  • Language Log, noting a television clip from Algeria in which a person defend their native dialect versus standard Arabic, compares the language situation in the Arab world to that of China.
  • Marginal Revolution’s Tyler Cowen explains how the Tervuren Central African museum in Brussels has not been decolonized.
  • The Planetary Society Blog explores the ice giants, Uranus and Neptune.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel explains why, in current physics, the multiverse must exist.
  • Strange Company explores the strange disappearance, in the Arizona desert in 1952, of a young couple. Their plane was found and in perfect condition, but what happened to them?
  • Strange Maps reports on the tragic migration of six Californian raptors, only one of which managed to make it to its destination.
  • Towleroad reports on the appearance of actor and singer Ben Platt on The Ellen Show, talking about his career and coming out.
  • Window on Eurasia notes the apparently widespread mutual dislike of Chechens and Muscovites.
  • Arnold Zwicky considers the French Impressionist artists Pierre Puvis de Chavannes and Suzanne Valadon, with images of their art.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes how the dinosaurs seem to have been killed off 65 million years ago by a combination of geological and astronomical catastrophes.
  • Centauri Dreams examines Kepler 1658b, a hot Jupiter in a close orbit around an old star.
  • The Crux reports on the continuing search for Planet Nine in the orbits of distant solar system objects.
  • D-Brief notes how researchers have begun to study the archaeological records of otters.
  • Cody Delistraty profiles author and journalist John Lanchester.
  • Far Outliers reports on the terrible violence between Hindus and Muslims preceding partition in Calcutta.
  • L.M. Sacasas at The Frailest Thing suggests the carnival of the online world, full of hidden work, is actually an unsatisfying false carnival.
  • Hornet Stories reports that São Paulo LGBTQ cultural centre and homeless shelter Casa 1 is facing closure thanks to cuts by the homophobic new government.
  • io9 reports on one fan’s attempt to use machine learning to produce a HD version of Deep Space Nine.
  • JSTOR Daily takes a look at the increasing trend, at least in the United States and the United Kingdom, to deport long-term residents lacking sufficiently secure residency rights.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money looks at the literally medieval epidemics raging among the homeless of California.
  • Marginal Revolution considers how the Book of Genesis can be read as a story of increasing technology driving improved living standards and economic growth.
  • The NYR Daily interviews Lénaïg Bredoux about #MeToo in France.
  • The Planetary Society Blog considers the subtle differences in colour between ice giants Uranus and Neptune, one greenish and the other a blue, and the causes of this difference.
  • The Speed River Journal’s Van Waffle shares beautiful photos of ice on a stream as he talks about his creative process.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel considers what the universe was like back when the Earth was forming.
  • Window on Eurasia reports on a statement made by the government of Belarus that the survival of the Belarusian language is a guarantor of national security.
  • Arnold Zwicky was kind enough to share his handout for the semiotics gathering SemFest20.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links (1)

I accumulated quite a few links over the long weekend just past in Canada, Monday having been Canada Day. That volume will make for two [BLOG] posts today.

(Feedly, thankfully, seems to be working well.)

  • Bag News Notes compares coverage of the protests in Brazil and Turkey, arguing that although the photos from the two countries convey similar images of violence, in actual fact the Brazilian protests are encountering less violence and are getting substantially more response from the national government than their Turkish counterparts.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes a recent study suggesting that gas giants–heavy planets like Jupiter and Saturn, not their smaller ice giant kin like Uranus and Neptune–seem to form, on the relatively rare occasions they do form, close to their sun.
  • Daniel Drezner considers the ethics of institutions of higher education receiving very large grants from foreign governments. Does it compromise them and/or can it engage them with the wider world?
  • Eastern Approaches notes the likely dire consequences on press freedom in Ukraine of a gas magnate’s purchase of Forbes‘ Ukrainian edition.
  • The Everyday Sociology Blog takes a look at what, if anything, the inability of Trayvon Martin witness Rachel Jeantel to read a handwritten note says about social capital.
  • Far Outliers’ Joel describes the medieval Venetian empire, the stato da mar, at its peak.
  • At A Fistful of Euros, Edward Hugh makes the case that the Czech economy is bound for stagnation.
  • Geocurrents maps the regional and ethnic dimensions of the recent Iranian presidential election.
  • Joe. My. God. links to Nate Silver’s chart showing the progression of same-sex marriage rights across the world, by population and by continent.
  • Language Hat examines the question of what exactly is Aranese (the Gascon Occitan dialect spoken in northwestern Catalonia, for starters).
  • New APPS Blog analyses a secular French feminism that is nonetheless anti-gay.
  • Progressive Download’s John Farrell argues that Slovenia is caught in an unusually intense form of stagnation stemming from its managed transition from Communism.