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Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘imperialism

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

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  • Adam Fish at anthro{dendum} shares a new take on the atmosphere, as a common good.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait shares a photo of Earth taken from a hundred million kilometres away by the OSIRIS-REx probe.
  • The Crux tells the story of how the first exoplanets were found.
  • D-Brief notes that life could be possible on a planet orbiting a supermassive black hole, assuming it could deal with the blueshifting.
  • io9 looks at the latest bold move of Archie Comics.
  • JSTOR Daily explores cleaning stations, where small fish clean larger ones.
  • Dan Nexon at Lawyers, Guns and Money looks at the role China seeks to play in a remade international order.
  • The Map Room Blog looks at the new upcoming national atlas of Estonia.
  • Marginal Revolution touches on the great ambition of Louis XIV for a global empire.
  • Steve Baker of The Numerati shares photos from his recent trip to Spain.
  • Anya Schiffrin at the NRY Daily explains how American journalist Varian Fry helped her family, and others, escape the Nazis.
  • Drew Rowsome reviews the classic movie The Adventures of Priscilla, Queen of the Desert.
  • Frank Jacobs at Strange Maps shares a map looking at the barriers put up by the high-income world to people moving from outside.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel answers the complex question of how, exactly, the density of a black hole can be measured.
  • John Scalzi at Whatever reviews Gemini Man. Was the high frame rate worth it?
  • Window on Eurasia notes the deep hostility of Tuvins towards a large Russian population in Tuva.
  • Arnold Zwicky considers the existential question of self-aware cartoon characters.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

  • Anthropology.net reports on the discovery of footprints of a Neanderthal band in Le Rozel, Normandy, revealing much about that group’s social structure.
  • Bad Astronomer’s Phil Plait explains why standing at the foot of a cliff on Mars during local spring can be dangerous.
  • Centauri Dreams shares a suggestion that the lakes of Titan might be product of subterranean explosions.
  • Chris Bertram at Crooked Timber considers how, and when, anger should be considered and legitimated in discussions of politics.
  • The Crux looks at the cement mixed successfully in microgravity on the ISS, as a construction material of the future.
  • D-Brief looks at what steps space agencies are considering to avoid causing harm to extraterrestrial life.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes new evidence that the Anthropocene, properly understood, actually began four thousand years ago.
  • Jonathan Wynn writes at the Everyday Sociology Blog about how many American universities have become as much lifestyle centres as educational communities.
  • Far Outliers reports on how, in the 13th century, the cultural differences of Wales from the English–including the Welsh tradition of partible inheritance–caused great instability.
  • This io9 interview with the creators of the brilliant series The Wicked and the Divine is a must-read.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at a paper considering how teachers of German should engage with the concept of Oktoberfest.
  • Language Hat looks at a new study examining the idea of different languages being more efficient than others. (They are not, it turns out.)
  • Language Log looks at the history of translating classics of Chinese literature into Manchu and Mongolian.
  • Erik Loomis considers the problems the collapse of local journalism now will cause for later historians trying to do research in the foreseeable future.
  • Marginal Revolution reports on research suggesting that markets do not corrupt human morality.
  • Neuroskeptic looks in more detail at the interesting, and disturbing, organized patterns emitted by organoids built using human brain cells.
  • Stephen Baker at The Numerati writes, with photos, about what he saw in China while doing book research. (Shenzhen looks cool.)
  • The NYR Daily notes the import of the working trip of Susan Sontag to Sarajevo in 1993, while that city was under siege.
  • Robert Picardo at the Planetary Society Blog shares a vintage letter from Roddenberry encouraging Star Trek fans to engage with the Society.
  • Noel Maurer at The Power and the Money looks at the economy of Argentina in a pre-election panic.
  • Strange Company looks at the life of Molly Morgan, a British convict who prospered in her exile to Australia.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that, in 1939, many Soviet citizens recognized the import of the Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact; they knew their empire would expand.
  • Arnold Zwicky looks at the treatment of cavemen, as subjects and providers of education, in pop culture.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

  • Architectuul notes a bike tour of Bauhaus architecture in Berlin.
  • Bad Astronomy Phil Plait notes the discovery of Beta Pictoris c, a second super-Jovian planet in that young system.
  • Centauri Dreams notes that the NASA Europa Clipper is moving ahead.
  • Crooked Timber shares a gorgeous night photo of San Giorgio Maggiore, in Venice.
  • The Crux notes what we are learning about the Denisovans.
  • D-Brief notes that Neanderthals were prone to swimmer’s ear.
  • Dangerous Minds looks at some of the pop culture likes of Karl Marx.
  • Drew Ex Machina’s Andrew LePage looks at the exoplanets of GJ 1061.
  • Earther notes how Icelanders mourned the loss of a glacier in a ceremony.
  • Whitney Kimball at Gizmodo looks at what the mass data loss of more than a decade’s worth of music at Myspace means for our Internet era.
  • Imageo shares photos of spiraling cloud formations photographed at night from space.
  • Ian Humberstone at The Island Review writes about his witnessing of the bonxies, birds of the Shetlands.
  • Joe. My. God. notes a report suggesting Trump joked about swapping Greenland for Puerto Rico.
  • JSTOR Daily notes how the rhythmic dancing of the Shakers in 18th century America marked that sect as different.
  • Language Hat considers the humour of some philosophers.
  • Language Log notes the oblique commentaries of Hong Kong tycoon Li Ka-shing on his city-state’s protests.
  • Erik Loomis at Lawyers, Guns and Money notes the idiocy of the Trump fetish for Greenland.
  • The Map Room Blog notes how astronomers have mapped the Local Void, of deep intergalactic space.
  • Marginal Revolution wonders if the future of Venice might be found in its becoming a Chinese portal into Europe.
  • Sean Marshall notes how the Ford government is undermining conservation in Ontario.
  • The NYR Daily shares some of the New York City photography of Phil Penman.
  • Starts With A Bang’s notes the immense storms of Saturn.
  • Strange Company shares a weekend collection of links.
  • Window on Eurasia looks at how Belarus plans on reorganizing its internal structures to try to minimize rural depopulation.
  • Nick Rowe at Worthwhile Canadian Initiative talks about monetary policy in metaphors.
  • Arnold Zwicky looks at some penguins from around the world.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

  • Shir Lerman Ginzburg at anthro{dendum} writes about kintsugi in her own life.
  • Bad Astronomy’s Phil Plait looks at the massive black hole, massing two billion suns, measured in the heart of NGC 3258.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly shares some photos from her Hudson River life.
  • D-Brief notes how astronomers may be able to detect the radio signals emitted from the cores of planets orbiting dead stars.
  • The Everyday Sociology Blog looks at the sociology of religion.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at how Ferdinand Magellan acted in many ways like a pirate.
  • Language Hat reports on the remarkable differences between the two dubbed French versions of The Simpsons, one in France and one in Québec.
  • Language Log reports on the Chinese placename “Xinjiang Uygur.”
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money makes the point that Joe Biden is too old, too set in his ways, to be president.
  • Molly Crabapple writes at the NYR Daily about the nature and goals of the massive protest movement in Puerto Rico.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel looks even-handedly at the controversy surrounding the idea of building the Thirty Metre Telescope on top of sacred Mauna Kea.
  • Window on Eurasia looks at controversy in Russia over the representation of different Tatar populations on the Russian 2020 census.
  • Stephen Gordon at Worthwhile Canadian Initiative wonders why it was 1953 that, in Canada, saw the growth in women on the job market.

[AH] Seven #alternatehistory r/imaginarymaps maps: Vinland, Mali, Korea, Poland, Balkans …

  • This r/imaginarymaps map traces a slow diffusion of Christianity westwards from a Vinland colony.
  • This r/imaginarymaps map imagines a transatlantic empire based in Africa, with the late 15th century Mali Empire extending its rule to Brazil and elsewhere.
  • This r/imaginarymaps map imagines a Joseon Korea that becomes the seat of a transpacific empire.
  • What if, this r/imaginarymaps map imagines, instead of turning east to Lithuania Poland turned west towards Czechia?
  • What if, this r/imaginarymaps map imagines, the Balkans retained a substantially larger Muslim population?
  • This r/imaginarymaps map imagines a Greater Denmark, expanding east and south.
  • Could Scotland ever have become, as this r/imaginarymaps map imagines, a maritime mercantile power?

[BLOG] Some Monday links

  • Centauri Dreams considers the recent study of near-Earth asteroid 1999 KW4, looking at it from the perspective of defending the Earth and building a civilization in space.
  • Ingrid Robeyns at Crooked Timber continues a debate on universal basic income.
  • The Dragon’s Tales considers if India does need its own military space force.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at how foster care in the United States (Canada, too, I’d add) was also synonymous with sending children off as unpaid farm labourers.
  • Erik Loomis at Lawyers, Guns and Money shares a proposal, linking immigration to high-income countries to the idea of immigration as reparation for colonialism.
  • The LRB Blog considers the ever-growing presence of the dead on networks like Facebook.
  • Muhammad Idrees Ahmad at the NYR Daily looks at how Bellingcat and other online agencies have transformed investigative journalism.
  • The Russian Demographics Blog shares a speech by the head of the Bank of Japan talking about the interactions of demographic change and economic growth.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes the mystery behind the great mass of early black hole J1342+0928.
  • Strange Company looks at the unsolved Christmas 1928 disappearance of young Melvin Horst from Orrville, Ohio. What happened?
  • Window on Eurasia notes that Uzbekistan is moving the Latin script for Uzbek into closer conformity with its Turkish model.

[AH] Five #alternatehistory maps from r/imaginarymaps: Germany, Britain, Africa, Japan, Iran

  • r/imaginarymaps imagines a Germany united along religious lines, Protestant areas falling under Prussia and Catholic ones under Austria.
  • Reddit’s imaginarymaps imagines a republican Great Britain. When could republicanism have taken off in the British Isles as a whole?
  • Reddit’s imaginarymaps shares a map of a former Portuguese colony of Zambezia, a Lusophone nation stretching from the Atlantic at Namibia east through to Mozambique.
  • This r/imaginarymaps map, imagining a Japan (and northeast Asia generally) split into sheres of influence by rival European powers, treaty ports and all, surely describes a worst-case scenario for 19th century Japan. How likely was this?
  • This r/imaginarymaps map imagines an Iran that, following a 9/11-style attack by Lebanese terrorists in Moscow, ends up partitioned between Soviet and US-Arab spheres of influence.