A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘in memoriam

[URBAN NOTE] Ten Montréal links

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  • La Presse notes the restoration of the old Archambault sign to its location at Sainte-Catherine and Berri. (I am reminded of the Sam the Record Man sign in Toronto.)
  • HuffPostQuebec notes that some of the strings of balls from 18 nuances de gai are up for sale.
  • Expelling Hong Kong activists from the Montréal pride parade should not have been done. CBC Montreal reports.
  • Camillien-Houde Way, on Mount Royal, will become more difficult for cyclists with the removal of a traffic light. CTV reports.
  • Les Forges de Montréal, heritage to the city’s blacksmithing tradition, has been saved. Global News reports.
  • Historian Desmond Morton, of McGill, has died. CBC Montreal reports.
  • The City of Montréal is trying to fight against food insecurity. CBC Montreal U>reports.
  • Craig Desson at CBC Montreal reports on the lasting legacy of Moshe Safdie and Habitat 67, and the replication of this prefabricated concrete model in rising Asia.
  • Actions of clients are the leading causes of delays on the Metro. CBC Montreal reports.

[CAT] Five links about cats: Peter Watts and Minion, Toronto, Alberta, sea lions, Marrakech

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  • Author Peter Watts bids farewell to his noble companion cat, Minion.
  • Narcity notes that Toronto Animal Services is offering cats (and dogs) at a discount.
  • An Alberta organization aiming to rehouse cats from older owners has found itself overwhelmed. CBC reports.
  • A parasite spread by housecats, Smithsonian reports, is responsible for mass deaths in sea lion colonies in California.
  • The suffering of the stray cats of Marrakech, Morocco, prone to all sorts of illness and cruelty, sounds terrible. Morocco World News has it.

Written by Randy McDonald

August 31, 2019 at 3:00 pm

[URBAN NOTE] Five Toronto links: Wallace Emerson, Dosa Mahal, Popeyes, Sam McBride, #nuitblanche

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  • Toronto Life reports on the successful conversion of a corner store in Wallace Emerson into a $C1.3 million home, here.
  • Bloordale’s Dosa Mahal restaurant, sadly, is facing closure in the face of landlord pressures. blogTO reports.
  • Popeyes in Canada lacks the chicken sandwiches that have gone viral in the US, and many in Toronto are unhappy. blogTO reports.
  • Jamie Bradburn reports on how, in 1936, mayor Sam McBride lay in state at Old City Hall.
  • NOW Toronto reports on the plans for Nuit Blanche 2019, here.

[URBAN NOTE] Five Toronto links; transit, Jane-Finch, Rob Ford, Riverdale Park East, beaches

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  • The federal government will provide a billion dollars in funding to Toronto transit, including to Bloor-Yonge station and GO Transit. CBC reports.
  • The Jane-Finch anti-violence barbecue has celebrated its tenth anniversary. CBC reports.
  • blogTO notes that people in Toronto can vote for–or against–naming a new street in Etobicoke’s Six Points after Rob Ford.
  • blogTO reports on the joys of Riverdale Park East.
  • Shawn Micallef writes at the Toronto Star about what the city can do to make it easier for Torontonians to get to their city’s beaches.

[URBAN NOTE] Five Toronto links: HTO Beach, street art, transit, Draper Street, real estate

  • Toronto’s HTO Park, a fake beach on the waterfront of Queens Quay, has been flooded out by Lake Ontario, too. blogTO reports.
  • This open-air street art museum around Dundas West is an ingenious idea. blogTO reports.
  • David Hains at Spacing explains how the TTC plans for major sports events, like the recent Raptors series.
  • One house in Corso Italia has just gone on the real estate market for the first time since 1919. The Toronto Star reports.
  • The row of vintage homes on Draper Street and its recently passed keeper are memorialized nicely here. The Toronto Star reports.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

  • Centauri Dreams considers the recent study of near-Earth asteroid 1999 KW4, looking at it from the perspective of defending the Earth and building a civilization in space.
  • Ingrid Robeyns at Crooked Timber continues a debate on universal basic income.
  • The Dragon’s Tales considers if India does need its own military space force.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at how foster care in the United States (Canada, too, I’d add) was also synonymous with sending children off as unpaid farm labourers.
  • Erik Loomis at Lawyers, Guns and Money shares a proposal, linking immigration to high-income countries to the idea of immigration as reparation for colonialism.
  • The LRB Blog considers the ever-growing presence of the dead on networks like Facebook.
  • Muhammad Idrees Ahmad at the NYR Daily looks at how Bellingcat and other online agencies have transformed investigative journalism.
  • The Russian Demographics Blog shares a speech by the head of the Bank of Japan talking about the interactions of demographic change and economic growth.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes the mystery behind the great mass of early black hole J1342+0928.
  • Strange Company looks at the unsolved Christmas 1928 disappearance of young Melvin Horst from Orrville, Ohio. What happened?
  • Window on Eurasia notes that Uzbekistan is moving the Latin script for Uzbek into closer conformity with its Turkish model.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • Architectuul looks at the history of brutalism in late 20th century Turkey.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait looks at the evidence for the Milky Way Galaxy having seen a great period of starburst two billion years ago, and notes how crowded the Milky Way Galaxy is in the direction of Sagittarius.
  • Centauri Dreams considers if astrometry might start to become useful as a method for detecting planets, and considers what the New Horizons data, to Pluto and to Ultima Thule, will be known for.
  • Belle Waring at Crooked Timber considers if talk of forgiveness is, among other things, sound.
  • D-Brief considers the possibility that the differing natures of the faces of the Moon can be explained by an ancient dwarf planet impact, and shares images of dust-ringed galaxy NGC 4485.
  • Dead Things notes the discovery of fossil fungi one billion years old in Nunavut.
  • Far Outliers looks at how, over 1990, Russia became increasingly independent from the Soviet Union, and looks at the final day in office of Gorbachev.
  • Gizmodo notes the discovery of literally frozen oceans of water beneath the north polar region of Mars, and looks at an unusual supernova, J005311 ten thousand light-years away in Cassiopeia, product of a collision between two white dwarfs.
  • JSTOR Daily notes how the colour of navy blue is a direct consequence of slavery and militarism, and observes the historical influence, or lack thereof, of Chinese peasant agriculture on organic farming in the US.
  • Language Log considers a Chinese-language text from San Francisco combining elements of Mandarin and Cantonese.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes the terrible environmental consequences of the Vietnam War in Southeast Asia, and Shakezula at Lawyers, Guns and Money takes a look at how, and perhaps why, Sam Harris identifies milkshake-throwing at far-right people as a form of “mock assassination”.
  • The Map Room Blog shares a personal take on mapmaking on the Moon during the Apollo era.
  • Marginal Revolution observes a paper suggesting members of the Chinese communist party are more liberal than the general Chinese population. The blog also notes how Soviet quotas led to a senseless and useless mass slaughter of whales.
  • Russell Darnley writes about the complex and tense relationship between Indonesia and Australia, each with their own preoccupations.
  • Martin Filler writes at the NYR Daily about I.M. Pei as an architect specializing in an “establishment modernism”. The site also takes a look at Orientalism, as a phenomenon, as it exists in the post-9/11 era.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw reflects on the meaning of Australia’s New England.
  • The Planetary Society Blog notes how Hayabusa 2 is having problems recovering a marker from asteroid Ryugu.
  • Peter Rukavina reports on an outstanding Jane Siberry concert on the Island.
  • The Russian Demographics Blog shares a map of homophobia in Europe.
  • The Signal looks at how the Library of Congress makes use of wikidata.
  • The Speed River Journal’s Van Waffle reports, with photos, from his latest walks this spring.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel considers what the Earth looked like when hominids emerged, and explains how amateur astronomers can capture remarkable images.
  • Frank Jacobs at Strange Maps shares a controversial map depicting the shift away from CNN towards Fox News across the United States.
  • Daniel Little at Understanding Society examines the Boeing 737 MAX disaster as an organizational failure.
  • Window on Eurasia looks why Turkey is backing away from supporting the Circassians, and suggests that the use of the Russian Orthodox Church by the Russian state as a tool of its rule might hurt the church badly.
  • Arnold Zwicky takes apart, linguistically and otherwise, a comic playing on the trope of Lassie warning about something happening to Timmy. He also
    reports on a far-removed branch of the Zwicky family hailing from Belarus, as the Tsvikis.