A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘indonesia

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • Architectuul looks at the history of brutalism in late 20th century Turkey.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait looks at the evidence for the Milky Way Galaxy having seen a great period of starburst two billion years ago, and notes how crowded the Milky Way Galaxy is in the direction of Sagittarius.
  • Centauri Dreams considers if astrometry might start to become useful as a method for detecting planets, and considers what the New Horizons data, to Pluto and to Ultima Thule, will be known for.
  • Belle Waring at Crooked Timber considers if talk of forgiveness is, among other things, sound.
  • D-Brief considers the possibility that the differing natures of the faces of the Moon can be explained by an ancient dwarf planet impact, and shares images of dust-ringed galaxy NGC 4485.
  • Dead Things notes the discovery of fossil fungi one billion years old in Nunavut.
  • Far Outliers looks at how, over 1990, Russia became increasingly independent from the Soviet Union, and looks at the final day in office of Gorbachev.
  • Gizmodo notes the discovery of literally frozen oceans of water beneath the north polar region of Mars, and looks at an unusual supernova, J005311 ten thousand light-years away in Cassiopeia, product of a collision between two white dwarfs.
  • JSTOR Daily notes how the colour of navy blue is a direct consequence of slavery and militarism, and observes the historical influence, or lack thereof, of Chinese peasant agriculture on organic farming in the US.
  • Language Log considers a Chinese-language text from San Francisco combining elements of Mandarin and Cantonese.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes the terrible environmental consequences of the Vietnam War in Southeast Asia, and Shakezula at Lawyers, Guns and Money takes a look at how, and perhaps why, Sam Harris identifies milkshake-throwing at far-right people as a form of “mock assassination”.
  • The Map Room Blog shares a personal take on mapmaking on the Moon during the Apollo era.
  • Marginal Revolution observes a paper suggesting members of the Chinese communist party are more liberal than the general Chinese population. The blog also notes how Soviet quotas led to a senseless and useless mass slaughter of whales.
  • Russell Darnley writes about the complex and tense relationship between Indonesia and Australia, each with their own preoccupations.
  • Martin Filler writes at the NYR Daily about I.M. Pei as an architect specializing in an “establishment modernism”. The site also takes a look at Orientalism, as a phenomenon, as it exists in the post-9/11 era.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw reflects on the meaning of Australia’s New England.
  • The Planetary Society Blog notes how Hayabusa 2 is having problems recovering a marker from asteroid Ryugu.
  • Peter Rukavina reports on an outstanding Jane Siberry concert on the Island.
  • The Russian Demographics Blog shares a map of homophobia in Europe.
  • The Signal looks at how the Library of Congress makes use of wikidata.
  • The Speed River Journal’s Van Waffle reports, with photos, from his latest walks this spring.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel considers what the Earth looked like when hominids emerged, and explains how amateur astronomers can capture remarkable images.
  • Frank Jacobs at Strange Maps shares a controversial map depicting the shift away from CNN towards Fox News across the United States.
  • Daniel Little at Understanding Society examines the Boeing 737 MAX disaster as an organizational failure.
  • Window on Eurasia looks why Turkey is backing away from supporting the Circassians, and suggests that the use of the Russian Orthodox Church by the Russian state as a tool of its rule might hurt the church badly.
  • Arnold Zwicky takes apart, linguistically and otherwise, a comic playing on the trope of Lassie warning about something happening to Timmy. He also
    reports on a far-removed branch of the Zwicky family hailing from Belarus, as the Tsvikis.

[DM] Ten links on migration (#demographics, #demographymatters)

  • CBC Kitchener-Waterloo notes how farmers in southwestern Ontario are trying to plan the transfer of their lands to new migrants.
  • HuffPost Québec notes how the labour market of Gaspésie is starting to attract workers.
  • The Guardian looks at how many New Zealanders are moving away from cities to less expensive and stressed rural areas.
  • The murder of an maid from Indonesia in Malaysia is straining relations between the two neighbouring countries. The National Post reports
  • Ozy looks how entrepreneurs from China, moving to Africa, are transforming that continent.
  • Open Democracy examines the background behind an outbreak of anti-immigrant sentiment in Yakutsk.
  • Doug Bock Clark writes at GQ about the underground networks smuggling North Koreans out of their country.
  • Eater reports on the early 20th century migration of Punjabis to California that ended up creating a hybrid Punjabi-Mexican cuisine.
  • Open Democracy tells the story of a woman who migrated from Thailand to Denmark for a marriage partner. Why is her migration less legitimate than others’?
  • The Inter Press Service warns against treating migrants as human commodities.

[URBAN NOTE] Five city links: Mississauga, Miami, Montréal, Jakarta, Lausanne

  • Missisauga’s mayor Bonnie Crombie makes the case for her city’s independence from Peel Region, over at the Toronto Star.
  • CityLab features a Richard Florida interview with sociologist Alejandro Portes on his new book examining the history and future of Miami.
  • New maps showing flood risks are available to municipalities in the Montréal region, but for various reasons they are not using them yet. CBC reports.
  • Guardian Cities reports on how the new president of Indonesia wants to move the country’s capital away from megacity Jakarta to a new location on the island of Borneo.
  • CityLab reports on how the Swiss city of Lausanne is making use of innovative new community consultations to decide how to manage its Place de la Riponne.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

  • Architectuul writes</u about the pioneering women architects of the United Kingdom.
  • Bad Astronomy reports on a marvelous mosaic assembled by amateur astronomers of the Large Magellanic Cloud.
  • Caitlin Kelly at the Broadside Blog notes how college debts in the United States hinder social mobility.
  • The Crux considers how the antibiotic-resistant fungus C. auris can be treated.
  • D-Brief looks at the archaeological studies of graves in the forest islands of Bolivia that have revealed remarkable things about the settlement of ancient Amazonia.
  • Far Outliers looks at how U.S. Grant built a pontoon bridge across the James River in Virginia.
  • Gizmodo notes the big crater created by Hayabusa 2 in the surface of Ryugu, suggesting that body’s loose composition.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at how the plan of Denmark to build a border fence to protect its pig populations against wild boars might be flawed.
  • Language Hat looks at the South Arabian languages, non-Arabic Semitic languages spoken in the south of the Arabian peninsula.
  • Erik Loomis at Lawyers, Guns and Money looks at the growing role of women in the American labour movement.
  • James Butler at the LRB Blog writes about the new urgency of the Extinction Rebellion in this era of climate change and threatened apocalypse.
  • Marginal Revolution considers a paper claiming that intergenerational social mobility in much of Canada is no higher than in most of the neighbouring United States.
  • The NYR Daily examines the democracy of Indonesia.
  • Noel Maurer at The Power and the Money looks at how a particular reading of international law was used in Bolivia to justify a violation of the national constitution.
  • Peter Rukavina shares an insightful map looking at the election results from PEI. One thing brought out by the map is the strength of the Greens across the Island.
  • The Speed River Journal’s Van Waffle looks at the useful Ontario shrub of leatherwood.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes the discovery of carbon-60 buckyballs in the far reaches of our galaxy by Hubble.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy notes that the president and the prime minister of Ukraine are both Jews.
  • Towleroad notes the new video by Willie Tay, a Singapore music star who was dropped by his label for being gay and has responded by coming out and releasing a video for his song “Open Up Babe”.
  • Window on Eurasia looks at the Ingermanlanders, also known as Ingrians or Ingrian Finns, a Finnic people in the hinterland of St. Petersburg who suffered horrifically under Communism.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell looks at how computers, originally imagined to function in certain specific ways, are being reimagined and reused in ways which do not quite suit them (and us).
  • Arnold Zwicky finds a stock photo used to represent art stolen by the Nazis and uses it to explore issues of recovery and loss and mistake.

[ISL] Five #islands links: Newfoundland, Komodo, South China Sea, Kiribati, Faroe Islands

  • This story about a genealogical mystery newly-found in the genetics of Newfoundland is fascinating. The National Post reports.
  • The island of Komodo has been closed to tourists to save the Komodo dragons from poachers. VICE reports.
  • China plans to build a city under its control among the islets of the South China Sea. Business Insider reports.
  • The Inter Press Service notes the spread of leprosy in Kiribati.
  • JSTOR Daily explains why, for one week, the Faroe Islands are closed to tourists to better enable cleaning and repairs.

[NEWS] Five D-Brief links: whales, bacteria, offshore platforms, Falcon Heavy, Denisovans

  • D-Brief notes the discovery of a fossil of a four-limbed whale in Peru, dating 42.5 million years.
  • D-Brief looks at how the bacterium Enterococcus faecalis morphed from normal gut bacteria to potentially fatal hospital-borne infection.
  • D-Brief notes a proposal to build offshore platforms as habitat for fish and for birds.
  • D-Brief notes how the Falcon Heavy is proving itself a vanguard of progress in spaceflight.
  • D-Brief notes new evidence of there having been multiple regional populations of Denisovans, drawing from work in Indonesia.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

  • Anthrodendum reviews the book Fistula Politics, the latest from the field of medical anthropology.
  • Architectuul takes a look at post-war architecture in Germany, a country where the devastation of the war left clean slates for ambitious new designers and architects.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait looks at newly discovered Kuiper Belt object 2008 VG 18.
  • Laura Agustín at Border Thinking takes a look at the figure of the migrant sex worker.
  • Centauri Dreams features an essay by Al Jackson celebrating the Apollo 8 moon mission.
  • D-Brief notes how physicists manufactured a quark soup in a collider to study the early universe.
  • Dangerous Minds shares some photos of a young David Bowie.
  • Angelique Harris at the Everyday Sociology Blog takes a look at what the social sciences have to say about sexuality and dating among millennial Americans.
  • Gizmodo notes the odd apparent smoothness of Ultima Thule, target of a very close flyby by New Horizons on New Year’s Day.
  • Hornet Stories notes the censorship-challenging art by Slava Mogutin available from the Tom of Finland store.
  • Imageo shares orbital imagery of the eruption of Anak Krakatau in Indonesia, trigger of a devastating volcanic tsunami.
  • Nick Stewart at The Island Review writes beautifully about his experience crossing the Irish Sea on a ferry, from Liverpool to Belfast.
  • Lyman Stone at In A State of Migration shares the story, with photos, of his recent whirlwind trip to Vietnam.
  • JSTOR Daily considers whether or not fan fiction might be a useful tool to promote student literacy.
  • Language Hat notes a contentious reconstruction of the sound system of obscure but fascinating Tocharian, an extinct Indo-European language from modern XInjiang.
  • Dan Nexon at Lawyers, Guns and Money notes the irreversible damage being caused by the Trump Administration to the United States’ foreign policy.
  • Marginal Revolution notes a paper suggesting users of Facebook would need a payment of at least one thousand dollars to abandon Facebook.
  • Lisa Nandy at the NYR Daily argues that the citizens of the United Kingdom need desperately to engage with Brexit, to take back control, in order to escape catastrophic consequences from ill-thought policies.
  • Marc Rayman at the Planetary Society Blog celebrates the life and achievements of the Dawn probe.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer notes that so many Venezuelans are fleeing their country because food is literally unavailable, what with a collapsing agricultural sector.
  • The Russian Demographics Blog breaks down polling of nostalgia for the Soviet Union among Russians.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes that simply finding oxygen in the atmosphere of an exoplanet is not by itself proof of life.
  • Ilya Somin at the Volokh Conspiracy reports on how the United States is making progress towards ending exclusionary zoning.
  • Whatever’s John Scalzi shares an interview with the lawyer of Santa Claus.
  • Window on Eurasia reports on a fascinating paper, examining how some Russian immigrants in Germany use Udmurt as a family language.
  • Arnold Zwicky takes a look at the lives of two notable members of the Swiss diaspora in Paris’ Montmartre.