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Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘international space station

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

  • Bad Astronomy’s Phil Plait notes the first time that an exoplanet, HR 8799e, has been directly observed using optical interferometry.
  • Centauri Dreams notes the possibility, demonstrated by the glimpsing of a circumplanetary disc around exoplanet PDS 70b, that we might be seeing a moon system in formation.
  • The Citizen Science Salon looks what observers in Antarctica are contributing to our wealth of scientific knowledge.
  • The Dragon’s Tales shares links to articles looking at the latest findings on the Precambrian Earth.
  • The Frailest Thing’s L.M. Sacasas writes about his ambivalent response to a Twitter that, by its popularity, undermines the open web.
  • Gizmodo notes that NASA is going to open up the International Space Station to tourists.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at how croquet, upon its introduction in the 19th century United States, was seen as scandalous for the way it allowed men and women to mix freely.
  • Shakezula at Lawyers, Guns and Money notes the unaccountable fondness of at least two Maine Republican legislators for the Confederacy.
  • Marginal Revolution suggests that the economic success of Israel in recent decades is a triumph of neoliberalism.
  • Stephen Ellis at the NYR Daily writes about the gymnastics of Willem de Kooning.
  • Drew Rowsome profiles out comic Brendan D’Souza.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel looks at the still strange galaxy NGC 1052-DF2, apparently devoid of dark matter.
  • John Scalzi at Whatever shares his theory about a fixed quantity of flavor in strawberries of different sizes.
  • Window on Eurasia looks at a contentious plan for a territorial swap between Armenia and Azerbaijan.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • Charlie Stross hosts at Antipope another discussion thread examining Brexit.
  • Architectuul takes a look at five overlooked mid-20th century architects.
  • Bad Astronomy shares a satellite photo of auroras at night over the city lights of the Great Lakes basin and something else, too.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly writes about the directions love has taken her, and wonders where it might have taken her readers.
  • Centauri Dreams reports on the Hayabusa 2 impactor on asteroid Ryugu.
  • John Quiggin at Crooked Timber takes issue with the claims of Steven Pinker about nuclear power.
  • D-Brief notes the detection, in remarkable detail, of a brilliant exocomet at Beta Pictoris.
  • The Dragon’s Tales considers the possibility that China might be building a military base in Cambodia.
  • Karen Sternheimer writes at the Everyday Sociology Blog about the importance of small social cues, easily overlookable tough they are.
  • Far Outliers notes the role of Japan’s imperial couple, Akihito and Michiko, in post-war Japan.
  • L.M. Sacasas at The Frailest Thing writes about the potential inadequacy of talking about values.
  • Gizmodo notes a new study suggesting the surprising and potentially dangerous diversity of bacteria present on the International Space Station.
  • Mark Graham shares a link to a paper, and its abstract, examining what might come of the creation of a planetary labour market through the gig economy.
  • Hornet Stories takes a look at Red Ribbon Blues, a 1995 AIDS-themed film starring RuPaul.
  • io9 notes that Guillermo del Toro and Cornelia Funke are co-writing a Pan’s Labyrinth novel scheduled for release later this year.
  • Joe. My. God. notes a new study suggesting 20% of LGBTQ Americans live in rural areas.
  • JSTOR Daily takes a look at the Bluestockings, the grouping of 18th century women in England who were noteworthy scholars and writers.
  • Language Hat notes an ambitious new historical dictionary of the Arabic language being created by the emirate of Sharjah.
  • Language Log examines, in the aftermath of a discussion of trolls, different cultures’ terms for different sorts of arguments.
  • Erik Loomis at Lawyers, Guns and Money notes how early forestry in the United States was inspired by socialist ideals.
  • The Map Room Blog links to a map showing the different national parks of the United Kingdom.
  • Alex Tabarrok at Marginal Revolution, noting the new findings from the Chixculub impact, notes how monitoring asteroids to prevent like catastrophes in the future has to be a high priority.
  • The New APPS Blog explains how data, by its very nature, is so easily made into a commodity.
  • The NYR Daily considers the future of the humanities in a world where higher education is becoming preoccupied by STEM.
  • Corey S. Powell at Out There interviews Bear Grylls about the making of his new documentary series Hostile Planet.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw considers the pleasures of birds and of birdwatching.
  • Jason C. Davis at the Planetary Society Blog noted the arrival of the Beresheet probe in lunar orbit.
  • Drew Rowsome reviews the new amazing-sounding play Angelique at the Factory Theatre.
  • The Russian Demographics Blog notes a paper that makes the point of there being no automatic relationship between greater gender equality and increases in fertility.
  • The Signal looks at how the Library of Congress has made use of the BagIt programming language in its archiving of data.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel comes up with questions to ask plausible visitors from other universes.
  • Strange Company notes the mysterious deaths visited on three members of a British family in the early 20th century. Who was the murderer? Was there even a crime?
  • Towleroad notes the activists, including Canadian-born playwright Jordan Tannahill, who disrupted a high tea at the Dorchester Hotel in London over the homophobic law passed by its owner, the Sultan of Brunei.
  • Window on Eurasia notes rising instability in Ingushetia.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell notes that the British surveillance of Huawei is revealing the sorts of problems that must be present in scrutiny-less Facebook, too.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

  • Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly talks about what goes into her creation of comfortable outdoor spaces. (I approve of the inclusion of blue; green is also nice.)
  • D-Brief notes that the strong stellar winds of TRAPPIST-1 means that the outermost worlds are best suited to retain their atmospheres and host Earth-like environments.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes that Russia has shown video of its latest crop of doomsday weapons.
  • Joe. My. God. notes the duet of a German astronaut on board the ISS with Kraftwerk.
  • JSTOR Daily considers if fear of race mixing, and of venereal disease, were important factors in the British Empire’s abolition of slavery in 1833.
  • Language Log notes differential censorship in China aimed at minority languages, using some books to be shipped from Inner Mongolia as an example.
  • Dan Nexon at Lawyers, Guns and Money suggests that Russian support for Trump was less a well-thought plan and more a desperate gamble with unpredictable and largely negative consequences for Russia.
  • The LRB Blog notes the perception by Proust of time as a dimension.
  • The Planetary Society Blog notes how the Apollo missions helped clear up the mystery of the origins of the Moon.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how the Donbas republics are inching away from Ukraine by seeking associations with adjacent Russian regions.