A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘internet

[NEWS] Four technology links: AIM, Ring of Fire Internet, robotic worms, lunar orbit stations

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  • Wired mourns AIM, AOL Instant Messenger. For me as with others, it really was a life-changing technology.
  • The Ring of Fire, a mineral-rich region of northern Ontario set for development, is getting high-speed Internet. The Toronto Star reports.
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  • VICE notes that someone programmed an Arduino robot with a simulation of a worm’s brain. This is very interesting.
  • The Crux considers the potential import of an orbital Moon station for future interplanetary travel.
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Written by Randy McDonald

October 7, 2017 at 9:45 pm

[NEWS] Three notes about the past and the future of Nunavut

  • CBC notes how 17 Inuit have been hired by Parks Canada to guard the site of the wrecks of Franklin’s ships.
  • That the Inuit who pointed the world to Franklin’s ships also knows of Franklin’s burial cairn does not surprise me.
  • Nunavut’s communities are set to have much faster Internet through new satellite connections.

Written by Randy McDonald

September 16, 2017 at 4:00 pm

[NEWS] Four links, on Lebanese and Lebanese food on the Island and mass media in rural areas

  • At VICE, Mike Miksche writes about how being Lebanese in North America became much more complicated, after 9/11 and with Islamophobia.
  • The story of how Cedar’s Eatery helped Lebanese food become entrenched on Prince Edward Island is fascinating. VICE reports.
  • CBC reports on how The Globe and Mail is going to stop print distribution in the Maritimes.
  • Bloomberg notes that rural areas need high-speed internet, too.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

  • Dangerous Minds points readers to Cindy Sherman’s Instagram account. (“_cindysherman_”, if you are interested.)
  • Language Hat takes note of a rare early 20th century Judaeo-Urdu manuscript.
  • Language Log lists some of the many, many words and phrases banned from Internet usage in China.
  • The argument made at Lawyers, Guns and Money about Trump’s many cognitive defects is frightening. How can he be president?
  • The LRB Blog notes that many traditional Labour voters, contra fears, are in fact willing to vote for non-ethnocratic policies.
  • The NYR Daily describes a book of photos with companion essays by Teju Cole that I like.
  • Of course, as Roads and Kingdom notes, there is such a thing as pho craft beer in Vietnam.
  • Peter Rukavina notes</a. the genetic history of mice in New York City and the beavers of Prince Edward Island.
  • Towleroad notes a love duet between Kele Okereke and Olly Alexander.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy seems unconvinced by the charges against Kronos programmer Marcus Hutchins.

[NEWS] Five culture links, from the ambivalent Internet, to ancient Chinese text, to LGBTQ history

  • I liked this Vice article on a study of the prevalence of ambivalence on the Internet. How will we learn to care?
  • Global News reports that the National Museum of Chinese Writing is willing to pay people who can decipher oracle bones three thousand years old.
  • CBC reports on an organization of LGBTQ farmers in Québec, Fierté Agricole.
  • Alex Needham writes at The Guardian about the life and work of Touko Laaksonen, “Tom of Finland.”
  • VICE’s take on Cecilia Aldonrondo’s documentary about the life of her dead gay uncle is touching.

[NEWS] Four links about science and the future: Caananites, iPod, birding, e-residency

  • The New York Times is but one news source to observe the findings of archeologists and geneticists that the Canaanites were not slaughtered. Was the claimed Biblical genocide a matter of thwarted wish-fulfillment?
  • At Wired, David Pierce mourns the standalone iPod, an innovative music-changing technology in its time now being phased out.
  • Catherine McIntyre at MacLean’s describes how birding is becoming hip among young urbanites, in Toronto and across Canada.
  • Open Democracy looks at how Estonia is pioneering e-residency and virtual citizenship schemes.

[NEWS] Seven links, from drugs in Germany to dolphin cuisine to dual nations in Australia

  • Johann Hari writes for Open Democracy about what may be the beginning of the end of the drug war in Germany.
  • I am not in agreement with Joseph Couture’s argument in NOW Toronto that the Internet has ended gay communities. (Convince me.)
  • Samantha Edwards reports in NOW Toronto controversy regarding the Parkdale feminist street art event. Was it really intersectional?
  • James Cooray Smith wonders–or “wonders”–why some Doctor Who fans are so upset with a woman portraying the Doctor.
  • In MacLean’s, chief Perry Bellegarde argues that more Canadians should be concerned with the too-many deaths of young First Nations people in Thunder Bay.
  • The National Post tells the story of how Australian senator Larissa Walters had to unexpectedly resign her position on account of her Canadian birth.
  • Via James Nicoll, a paper claiming evidence of human presence in northern Australia, in Madjedbebe, 65k years ago.
  • National Geographic tells of the peculiar way some Gulf of Mexico dolphins prepare their catfish. Is it cultural, culinary even?