A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘iraq

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

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  • Anthropology.net shares in the debunking of the Toba catastrophe theory.
  • Architectuul features Mirena Dunu’s exploration of the architecture of the Black Sea coastal resorts of Romania, built under Communism.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly writes about the importance of sleep hygiene and of being well-rested.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes the filaments of Orion, indicators of starbirth.
  • Centauri Dreams notes how solar sails and the Falcon Heavy can be used to expedite the exploration of the solar system.
  • D-Brief notes the discovery of debris marking the massive flood that most recently refilled the Mediterranean on the seafloor near Malta.
  • Lucy Ferriss at Lingua Franca uses a recent sickbed experience in Paris to explore the genesis of Bemelmans’ Madeline.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money noted recently the 15th anniversary of the American invasion of Iraq, trigger of a world-historical catastrophe.
  • The LRB Blog hosts Sara Roy’s defense of UNRWA and of the definition of the Palestinians under its case as refugees.
  • The NYR Daily notes how the regnant conservative government in Israel has been limiting funding to cultural creators who dissent from the nationalist line.
  • Roads and Kingdoms uses seven food dishes to explore the history of Malta.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel explains why, even though dark matter is likely present in our solar system, we have not detected signs of it.
  • Daniel Little at Understanding Society examines the field of machine learning, and notes the ways in which its basic epistemology might be flawed.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how the dropping of the ethnonym “Mongol” from the title of the former Buryat-Mongol autonomous republic sixty years ago still makes some Buryats unhappy.
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[URBAN NOTE] Five Toronto links: Toronto Fast Food, Presto, Toronto Days, photos, history

  • Toronto Fast Food is apparently a thriving emerging restaurant chain in the Iraqi Kurdish city of Erbil. Daily Hive reports.
  • The TTC has suspended the installation of new Presto gates on account of widespread and apparently systemic flaws with their technology. Amazing. The Toronto Star reports.
  • Shawn Micallef writes about Toronto Days, a marvelous exhibit of vintage photos taken in the Toronto of the 1980s and the 1990s, over at the Toronto Star.
  • This NOW Toronto feature contrasting some of the oldest photos taken of the Toronto skyline with photos taken at those locations in our era shows the scale of our city’s growth.
  • Elizabeth Berks and Richard Longley write at NOW Toronto about how, at the dawn of photography, Toronto was not only a much smaller city than it is now but a much narrower one, too.

[NEWS] Five notes on cultural change: Jordan Peterson, blogging under ISIS, India, Canadian drama

  • NOW Toronto observes that U of T professor Jordan Peterson is directly threatening other members of the academic community to which he belongs.
  • VICE reports on how an Iraqi in Mosul managed to maintain an ISIS-critical blog while under ISIS rule.
  • Mihir Sharma notes, for Bloomberg View, that Indian education needs to be vastly improved if India is to take off.
  • This exploration of the reasons why Canadian playwrights are big in Japan is fascinating. (Translator Tohoshi Yoshihara is a huge fan.) NOW Toronto explores.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

  • Apostrophen’s ‘Nathan Smith updates his readers about the progress of his various writing projects.
  • The Big Picture shares photos from the Battle of Mosul waged against ISIS.
  • Centauri Dreams notes the discovery of rogue binary planet 2MASS J11193254–1137466, two super-Jupiters by themselves.
  • Dangerous Minds notes the raw photography of early 20th century New York City’s Weegee.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money is rightly unimpressed by the reflexive Russophilia of The Nation. Imperialism is still imperialism …
  • Marginal Revolution’s Tyler Cowen strongly recommends Dali, in the Chinese province of Yunnan, for tourists.
  • The NYR Daily features Masha Gessen, looking at the truth underneath the lies of Trump.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer makes a case that Macron’s use of “civilizational” to describe Africa’s issues might be the subject of over-quick outrage.
  • Peter Rukavina describes his two weeks with a Nokia N95, without a modern smartphone. There was good and bad to this.
  • Speed River Journal’s Van Waffle explains, with photos, what hoverflies are and why they are so important.
  • Understanding Society considers a fraught question: what paths to modernization were open for China in the 1930s, before the People’s Republic?
  • Window on Eurasia suggests that, in 30 years, Moscow will be a megacity with a large population of (substantially immigrant) Muslim origin.

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

  • Language Log argues that, despite a lack of official or public support, Cantonese remains the dominant language of Hong Kong.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money makes the case for the global relevance of the Cranberries’ song “Zombie.”
  • Marginal Revolution seems to like the end results of Canada’s immigration system.
  • The NYR Daily notes that, even after ISIS, Iraq will be beset by multiple ethnoreligious crises.
  • Out There’s Corey S. Powell interviews an astronomer about the very strange Przybylski’s Star, rich in rare radioactive elements.
  • Savage Minds considers the decolonization of anthropology in the context of Iraq.
  • Arnold Zwicky considers the surprisingly deep historical resonance of the loon in Canada.

[LINK] “Trump’s Ban Undermines Iraqi Cooperation Against Islamic State”

Meghan L O’Sullivan writes for Bloomberg View about how the ban on Iraqis’ entry specifically, by demonstrating a lack of American trust, undermines the US-Iraqi relationship more generally.

There are many good reasons to object to the Trump administration’s new ban on allowing people from seven predominantly Muslim Middle East countries to travel to the U.S. and halting the acceptance of Syrian refugees. I am among the many Americans ashamed that our great country could so easily push aside its history of caring for people with the most desperate needs in the world. I also am among the national security analysts who don’t see how this helps deliver on the promise of protecting the U.S. from terrorism, and worry that they will inflame the resentment and anti-Americanism that fuel attacks against our citizens at home and abroad.

But, most tangibly and practically, I am among the millions of Americans who served as soldiers, diplomats or humanitarian workers in Iraq or Afghanistan, and therefore have insights into how the immigration ban has made Defense Secretary James Mattis’s job of devising a plan to eradicate Islamic State a whole lot more difficult.

On Saturday, Trump issued a national security memo giving Mattis and the Pentagon 30 days to “develop a comprehensive plan to defeat ISIS.” Yet the immigration ban seriously complicates that task by jeopardizing the cooperation of Iraqis. Iraqis are among the most important partners we have in fighting the Islamic State. While the U.S. and its allies are providing critical air, intelligence and logistical support in northern Iraq, it is Iraqi forces — both Arab and Kurd — that are pushing Islamic State out of Mosul, the nation’s second-largest city.

As evidenced by Mattis’s efforts to get exceptions to the immigration ban for Iraqis who worked alongside American forces, we rely heavily on Iraqis willing to risk their lives, and those of their families, to work with us. Such cooperation has cost many Iraqi lives. Signaling that we may need them while we are operating in Iraq, but see them as a security threat in the U.S., will have an immediate chilling effect. This distrust will not be limited to those Iraqis who want to become U.S. residents or citizens, but will permeate all of our relationships there.

Written by Randy McDonald

February 1, 2017 at 5:45 pm

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

  • The Boston Globe‘s The Big Picture shares photos of Spain’s Pueblos Blancos of Andalusia.
  • blogTO reports on Toronto’s biggest pumpkin parade.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly talks about the immigrant’s dilemma on election date.
  • Dangerous Minds notes the importance of Beyoncé and Jay-Z’s concert for Hillary.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to a report on hot Jupiter Kelt-17b.
  • The Dragon’s Tales suggests Sputnik Planitia may dominate Pluto.
  • Far Outliers talks about Cherokee language revitalization movements.
  • Language Log looks at a Korean tradition of satirical poetry in Korea and classical Chinese.
  • Marginal Revolution links to a fascinating book about manuscripts.
  • The NYRB Daily talks about Trump as a consequence of the Iraq War.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw notes the recent discovery of evidence for ancient habitation in Australia.
  • The Planetary Society Blog notes the advance of plans for a lunar-orbit space station.
  • Peter Rukavina shares headlines in the Guardian of a century ago on Romania’s entry into the First World War.
  • Torontoist annotates the SmartTrack report.
  • Towleroad shares Robyn’s new track, “Trust Me.”
  • Understanding Society celebrates its 9th anniversary.
  • Window on Eurasia reports on Russia’s escalating HIV/AIDS epidemic.