A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘ireland

[BLOG] Some Monday links

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  • Andrew Barton quite approves of the Helsinki Metro.
  • Anthropology.net notes the complexity of the peopling of Eurasia, over hundreds of thousands of years and with multiple human populations.
  • Daily JSTOR has an insightful take on the fiction of the free market, looking back to Peter Drucker.
  • Far Outliers notes that the role missionaries played in the development of area studies.
  • At A Fistful of Euros, Alex Harrowell takes a look at the complexities of the latest Brexit negotiations, concentrating on the DUP and Ireland.
  • At The Frailest Thing, Michael Sacasas notes the addition of a Paypal option alongside Patreon and asks for feedback.
  • Hornet Stories notes that the Gengoroh Tagame manga My Brother’s Husband is set for a television adaptation.
  • Language Log takes a look at the complexities surrounding a piece of Maoist rhetoric. Did Mao actually say that the Chinese people stood up at Tiannamen in 1949?
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money looks at the rhetoric surrounding parkland in Utah. Who is it being protected for, and what do these people have to gain from the despoliation?
  • Marginal Revolution looks at a study of Switzerland suggesting that clear boundaries have helped maintain communal peace there.
  • At the NYR Daily, Tim Parks has a lovely essay exploring the importance of the translator as a sort of secondary creator.
  • Window on Eurasia looks at Tatarstan, and argues post-Soviet governments there made a mistake by concentrating on parallel Tatar and Russian cultures, as opposed to propagating Tatar language and culture for all.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell suggests that, in British political life, there are two working cultures, politicians who derive authority from merit and politicians who derive authority from brilliance. Guess who fares worse?
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[ISL] Four islands links: Puerto Rico, Ireland, Prince Edward Island, Okinoshima

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  • The New York Times suggests that the proper death toll from Hurricane Maria in Puerto Rico alone may be more than a thousand, not the official toll of 62.
  • Mary Fitzgerald at Open Democracy looks at how Ireland, North and South, may have fatally undermined the May government and the Brexit project.
  • Tamara Khandaker at VICE reports the predictable news that Prince Edward Island plans to permit the legal sale of marijuana through stores run by the monopolistic liquor corporation, like the larger Ontario.
  • Jonathan Kaiman reports on Okinoshima, a sacred island in Japan whose keepers fear increased attention will threaten the location’s very nature.

[NEWS] Five notes from islands: Fogo and Newfoundland, Puerto Rico, Ireland, Just Enough Island, PEI

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    Jessica Leeder reports on how, with the fragile recovery of the Newfoundland cod fisheries, Fogo Island is investigating the fisheries’ new potential, over at The Globe and Mail.

  • This Atlas Obscura feature takes a look at the endangered Puerto Rico parrot, the iguaca, facing dire conditions after Hurricane Maria.
  • Gerry Lynch makes the argument that, by torpedoing the Brexit agreement, the DUP and the Unionists have set the stage for eventual Irish reunification, over at Slugger O’Toole.
  • Atlas Obscura takes a quick look at Just Enough Island, one of the Thousand Islands in the St. Lawrence between Ontario and New York literally just big enough to support a cottage and two chairs in the front.
  • Éric Grenier suggests that, after the Green Party’s Hannah Bell won a byelection in Charlottetown, the Green Party should look to Atlantic Canada for breakthroughs, over at CBC.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

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  • At Antipope, Charlie Stross examines the connections between bitcoin production and the alt-right. Could cryptocurrency have seriously bad political linkages?
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes GW170680, a recent gravitational wave detection that is both immense in its effect and surprising for its detection being normal.
  • Centauri Dreams reports on a new study suggesting hot Jupiters are so large because they are heated by their local star.
  • Crooked Timber counsels against an easy condemnation of baby boomers as uniquely politically malign.
  • Daily JSTOR notes one paper that takes a look at how the surprisingly late introduction of the bed, as a piece of household technology, changed the way we sleep.
  • Dangerous Minds shares a 1968 newspaper interview with Dennis Wilson of the Beach Boys, talking about Charlie Manson and his family and their influence on him.
  • The Everyday Sociology Blog takes a look at the opioid epidemic and the way that it is perceived.
  • At A Fistful of Euros, Alex Harrowell suggests that the unsolvable complexities of Northern Ireland may be enough to avoid a hard Brexit after all.
  • The LRB Blog describes a visit to a seaside village in Costa Rica where locals and visitors try to save sea turtles.
  • Lingua Franca reflects on the beauty of the Icelandic language.
  • The Map Room Blog shares an awesome map depicting the locations of the stars around which we have detected exoplanets.
  • Marginal Revolution notes the ill health of North Korean defectors, infected with parasites now unseen in South Korea.
  • Roads and Kingdoms reports on the revival of fonio, a West African grain that is now starting to see successful marketing in Senegal.
  • Spacing reviews a fascinating book examining the functioning of urban villages embedded in the metropoli of south China.
  • Strange Company reports on the mysterious 1920 murder of famous bridge player Joseph Bowne Elwell.
  • Towleroad reports on Larnelle Foster, a gay black man who was a close friend of Meghan Markle in their college years.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that, although Ukraine suffered the largest number of premature dead in the Stalinist famines of the 1930s, Kazakhstan suffered the greatest proportion of dead.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell has a photo essay looking at the Berlin Brandenburg Airport, still years away from completion and beset by many complex failures of its advanced systems. What does the failure of this complex system say about others we may wish to build?

[BLOG] Some Friday links

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  • James Bow shares a deeply personal memory about a streetcar stop by Queens Quay where his life was recently transformed.
  • D-Brief notes that antimatter is one byproduct of lightning. (Really.)
  • Daily JSTOR counsels against buying into the scam of “authenticity.”
  • Language Hat shares a 2005 essay by Patricia Palmer, talking about how the spread of English was intimately linked with imperialism, first in Ireland then overseas.
  • Erik Loomis at Lawyers, Guns and Money is strongly against Black Friday.
  • The NYR Daily notes that Donald Trump’s hardline policies are not going to help bring about change in Cuba.
  • Out There talks about how we are able to be pretty sure that interstellar asteorid ‘Oumuamua is not an extraterrestrial artifact.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer tries to imagine, economically, what an American Ontario would be like.
  • Roads and Kingdoms talks about some good local beer enjoyed in Chiapas.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel shares a list of ten scientific phenomena we should be thankful for, if we want to exist.
  • Arnold Zwicky shares a photo of his Christmas bell flowering maple.

[NEWS] Three science and technology links: climate change and the US, payphones, Bombardier

  • The Inter Press Service examines how, at the subnational level, American states and cities and other entities are trying to fight against climate change.
  • Payphones, it turns out, actually still turn profits. There is some future to this technology yet in our cell phone era. VICE reports.
  • The Bombardier vision of its Northern Ireland plant at one supporting Airbus’ enterprises is lovely, but only if hard Brexit is somehow averted. Bloomberg reports.

[ISL] Four islands links: Cyprus and Northern Ireland, Fiji, Cayman Islands, New Brunswick

  • Some think the Green Line in Cyprus can be a suitable model for post-Brexit Northern Ireland. So depressing. European think-tank Brughel reports.
  • Fiji is already starting to see an influx of migrants/refugees from lower-lying Pacific island countries. DW reports.
  • The Queen making use of Cayman Islands tax shelters only makes sense. She is queen there, after all. Open Democracy reports.
  • Global News notes that a Québec family has put up for sale a private island in New Brunswick, on the Bay of Fundy.