A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘islam

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

leave a comment »

  • Kambiz at Anthropology.net notes evidence that Neanderthals in Italy used fire to shape digging sticks 170 thousand years ago.
  • Missing persons blog Charley Ross reminds online commentators to be careful and reasonable in their speculations online, if only because these last forever.
  • D-Brief notes a new study of the TRAPPIST-1 system suggesting that its outermost planets, in the circumstellar habitable zone, are so low density that they must have abundant volatiles. Water is the most likely candidate.
  • Hornet Stories introduces readers to the impressive photography of New York City’s Peter Hujar.
  • At In Media Res, Russell Arben Fox meditates on the issues of friendship in the contemporary world.
  • Joe. My. God. shares representative Tammy Duckworth’s mockery of the authoritarian Donald Trump, aka “Cadet Bone Spurs”.
  • JSTOR Daily notes the continuing importance of the films of Rainer Werner Fassbinder.
  • The Map Room Blog notes that someone has made cute maps of seven solar system worlds for children.
  • Marginal Revolution links to an article looking at how some of the schoolgirls abducted in Nigeria by Boko Haram are doing.
  • The NYR Daily engages with “Soul of a Nation”, a touring exhibit of African-American art in the era of Black Power.
  • The Planetary Society Blog reports from the scene of the impending Falcon Heavy launch, sharing photos.
  • Towleroad notes a South African church that not only beats its queer parishoners but fines them, too.
  • Window on Eurasia suggests</u. Western sanctions could hinder the Russian development of its Arctic presence.
Advertisements

[URBAN NOTE] Five Toronto links: Metrolinx stops, Dean Lisowick, Toronto vigil, barbering, sales tax

leave a comment »

  • Transit Toronto notes that Metrolinx is actively soliciting ideas for stop names on the two light rail lines, Finch West in Toronto and Hurontario in Brampton and Missisauga.
  • This look at the life of Dean Lisowick, an apparent victim whose life revolved around the Scott Mission, is terribly informative and terribly sad. The Toronto Star has it.
  • The CBC reports on a Toronto vigil on the one-year anniversary of the Québec City mosque shooting.
  • CBC reports on barber Dwight Murray’s argument that the Ontario requirement for barbers to learn hairdressing styles not directly relevant to their craft should be changed.
  • At the Toronto Star, Christopher Hume makes an argument for a Toronto sales tax. (I would make it a GTA sales tax, myself.)

[URBAN NOTE] Seven Toronto links: Sidewalk Labs, Bentway, density, real estate, photos, PsiPhon

  • David Rider reports on the promise of the head of Google’s Sidewalk Labs to make Toronto the “first truly 21st century city”, and what that means, over at the Toronto Star.
  • Richard Longley at NOW Toronto praises the Bentway for its subtly transformative nature.
  • MacLean’s reports at length on the Fraser Institute report suggesting Toronto and Vancouver do have plenty of room in which to become more dense.
  • The extent to which foreign capital plays a role in real estate markets in Toronto and Vancouver may well not be fully covered by current statistics, one argues at The Globe and Mail.
  • Toronto Life shares some Instagram photos from prominent Torontonians who have been off vacationing in warmer climes.
  • The Jewish Defense League is now becoming active in Toronto, apparently, and organizing against Muslims. Grand. NOW Toronto warns.
  • The app PsiPhon, designed in Toronto, is being used by Iranians seeking to avoid censorship at home. The Toronto Star reports.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait shares stunning images, from Jupiter, of the Great Red Spot of Jupiter, and analysis.
  • Hornet Stories notes that a reboot of 1980s animation classic She-Ra is coming to Netflix.
  • io9 carries reports suggesting that the new X-Men Dark Phoenix movie is going to have plenty of good female representation. Here’s to hoping. It also notes that the seminal George Lucas short film “Electronic Labyrinth: THX 1138 4EB” is viewable for free online, but only for a short while.
  • Marginal Revolution links to a paper suggesting that IQ score, more than education, is the single biggest factor explaining why a person might become an inventor.
  • The NYR Daily looks at the alliance rightfully called “unholy” between religious militants and the military in Pakistan.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer explains how the strong social networks of Italian migrants in Argentina a century ago helped them eventually do better than native-born Argentines (and Spanish immigrants, too).
  • Roads and Kingdoms notes the simple joys of pupusas, Salvadoran tortillas, on a rainy day in Vancouver.
  • Towleroad reports on interesting research suggesting that gay men are more likely to have older brothers, even suggesting a possible biological mechanism for this.
  • Window on Eurasia notes reports of fights between Russian and Muslim students at Russian centres of higher education.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes that the Earth can easily survive without us.
  • blogTO notes that the Aga Khan Museum recently made an appearance in Star Trek: Discovery, as Vulcan.
  • Centauri Dreams notes the way neutron star collisions and kilonovas can be used to examine physical laws in extreme circumstances.
  • Hornet Stories notes that trans political candidate Danica Roem, in Virginia, is getting lots of positive attention.
  • The LRB Blog visits Gdansk only to find popular anti-Muslim xenophobia thriving.
  • The NYR Daily looks at photographic and other legacies of the Jamaica dancehall scene.
  • The Planetary Society Blog looks at the evolution of SETI from the 1960s to the present.
  • Roads and Kingdoms looks at the struggle of astronomers, in West Texas and elsewhere, to preserve dark skies.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel looks at the ways in which GW170817 has confirmed the Standard Model.
  • Window on Eurasia argues that reactionary conservatism in Russia is making that country’s HIV/AIDS epidemic worse.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

  • Centauri Dreams links to archival video painstakingly collected from the Voyager missions.
  • Citizen Science Salon notes ways ordinary people can use satellite imagery for archaeological purposes.
  • Good news: Asian carp can’t find a fin-hold in Lake Michigan. Bad news: The lake is so food-deprived nothing lives there. The Crux reports.
  • D-Brief notes that, once every second, a fast radio burst occurs somewhere in the universe.
  • Dangerous Minds looks at the psychedelic retro-futurism of Swedish artist Kilian Eng.
  • Dead Things notes the recovery of ancient human DNA from some African sites, and what this could mean for study.
  • Cody Delistraty reconsiders the idea of the “coming of age” narrative. Does this make sense now that we have abandoned the idea of a unitary self?
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to a paper examining the evolution of icy bodies around different post-main sequence stars.
  • The Great Grey Bridge’s Philip Turner notes anti-Putin dissident Alexei Navalny.
  • Hornet Stories notes reports of anti-gay persecution in Azerbaijan.
  • Language Log takes a look at the dialectal variations of southern Ohio.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money starts a discussion about what effective disaster relief for Puerto Rico would look like.
  • The LRB Blog looks at the aftermath of the recent earthquake in Mexico, and the story of the buried girl who was not there.
  • Marginal Revolution notes that Toronto real estate companies, in light of rent control, are switching rental units over to condos.
  • Naked Anthropologist Laura Agustín takes a look at the origins and stories of migrant sex workers.
  • The NYR Daily talks about the supposedly unthinkable idea of nuclear war in the age of Trump.
  • Drew Rowsome gives a strongly positive–and deserved review to the Minmar Gaslight show The Seat Next to the King, a Fringe triumph now playing at the Theatre Centre.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel explains how so many outer-system icy worlds have liquid water.
  • Towleroad features Jim Parsons’ exploration of how important is for him, as a gay man, to be married.
  • Window on Eurasia suggests Russian language policy limiting minority languages in education could backfire, and wonders if Islamization one way people in an urbanizing North Caucasus are trying to remain connected to community.

[URBAN NOTE] Four Toronto notes: air conditioning, Kent Monkman, ISIS at Canadian Tire, minimum wage

  • In this unseasonably warm September, Toronto tenants need more air conditioning than some landlords provide. The Toronto Star reports.
  • NOW Toronto notes the launch of a new Kent Monkman canvas, this one depicting a Dutch-Iroquois treaty signing.
  • The bizarre story of an ISIS supporter who tried to attack people at a Canadian Tire store is getting more bizarre. The Toronto Star reports.
  • There is a possibility the Ontario minimum wage increase could hurt employment outside of well-off Toronto. The Globe and Mail reports.

Written by Randy McDonald

September 21, 2017 at 8:00 pm