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[NEWS] Some Wednesday links

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  • Bloomberg notes Ireland’s huge unexpected recent reported growth, looks at the deindustrialization of Israel, observes Deutsche Bank’s need to search for wealth abroad, looks at the demographic imperatives that may keep healthy Japanese working until they are 80, notes the slipping ANC grip on Pretoria and looks at the rise of anti-Muslim Pauline Hanson in Australia, and predicts Brexit could kill the London property boom.
  • Bloomberg View calls for calm in the South China Sea.
  • CBC notes some idiot YouTube adventurers who filmed themselves doing stupid, even criminal, things in different American national parks.
  • The Globe and Mail reports on the plans for a test tidal turbine in the Bat of Fundy by 2017.
  • MacLean’s looks at the heckling of a gay musician in Halifax and reports on the civil war in South Sudan.
  • The New York Times looks at the new xenophobia in the east English town of Boston.
  • Open Democracy notes that talk of a working class revolt behind Brexit excludes non-whites, and reports on alienation on the streets of Wales.
  • Wired looks at how some cash-strapped American towns are tearing up roads they cannot afford to maintain.

[NEWS] Some Tuesday links

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  • Bloomberg notes political despair in Japan’s industrial heartland and looks at Argentina’s statistical issues.
  • The Globe and Mail reports on Morocco’s continued industrialization and describes the fear of a Vancouver-based pop singer for the life of her mother in China.
  • The Inter Press Service notes the recent terror attack in Dhaka, Bangladesh’s capital.
  • MacLean’s notes the good relations of Israel and Egypt.
  • The National Post reports on recent discoveries of quiet black holes.
  • Open Democracy looks at the connections between migration and housing policy in the United Kingdom.
  • Transitions Online notes how Brexit has wrecked central Europe’s relationships with the United Kingdom.

[NEWS] Some Thursday links

  • Bloomberg notes concern in Northern Ireland’s border towns over Brexit, reports that Morgan may shift its offices from London to Dublin or Frankfurt, and looks at the hostile reaction Donald Trump is likely to receive in Scotland.
  • Bloomberg View looks at the vexed issues of American funding for Israel’s defense industry.
  • The CBC notes the discovery of a transmissible cancer affecting shellfish.
  • MacLean’s takes a sanguine view of millennials in Canada who stay with their parents.
  • The National Post interviews a Muslim woman attacked in London, Ontario, and notes odd institutional issues raised against the Pride parade in Steinbach.
  • The New Republic looks at the impact the collapse of Barnes & Noble would have on American publishing and literature.
  • Open Democracy fears the effect of Brexit on central and eastern Europe.
  • Transitions Online notes the lack of reciprocation for Bulgarian Russophilia.
  • Wired notes that the Brexit referendum is a major inflection point in the European Union’s history.

[NEWS] Some Wednesday links

  • Bloomberg notes the rise of populism in Mexico, looks at how Europe is losing its reputation as a renewable energy leader, looks at political protest in Zimbabwe, and looks at changing habits of Saudi oil ministers.
  • Bloomberg View notes the politicization of the Israeli army, looks at an effort to smuggle Korean pop culture into North Korea, and considers strategies to encourage Japanese to have more children.
  • The Globe and Mail considers the risky strategy of marijuana growers, who hope to get the government to back down as they do their thing before legalization.
  • MacLean’s notes that the outcry over the shooting of the gorilla in the Cleveland zoo is misconceived, and reports on Kamal al-Solaylee’s book about being brown.
  • NOW Toronto notes that one argument raised against letting permanent residents vote in Toronto is that Donald Trump allegedly has an apartment here. (Wrong, on multiple grounds.)
  • Open Democracy looks at how British authoritarianism is restrained by the European Union.

[NEWS] Some Wednesday links

  • Al Jazeera looks at the rejection of political Islam by Tunisia’s Ennahda party.
  • The Australian Broadcasting Corporation notes the ambition of Zambia to become a major food-exporting country.
  • Bloomberg notes the negative impact of booming immigration on the New Zealand economy, observes Ireland’s efforts to attract financial jobs from London-based companies worried by Brxit, reports on the elimination of Brazil’s sovereign wealth fund, and notes a lawsuit lodged by Huawei against Samsung over royalties.
  • Bloomberg View notes that Russia can at least find domestic investors, and worries about the politicization of the Israeli military.
  • CBC reports on the Syrian refugee who has become a popular barber in Newfoundland’s Corner Brooks, notes the sad news of Gord Downie’s cancer, and wonders what will happen to Venezuela.
  • Daily Xtra writes about the need for explicit protection of trans rights in Canadian human rights codes.
  • MacLean’s notes Uber’s struggles to remain in Québec.
  • National Geographic notes Brazilian efforts to protect an Amazonian tribe.
  • The National Post reports about Trudeau’s taking a day off on his Japan trip to spend time with his wife there.
  • Open Democracy wonders what will become of the SNP in a changing Scotland.
  • The Toronto Star looks at payday lenders.
  • Wired examines Twitter’s recent changes.

[NEWS] Some Wednesday links

  • Bloomberg looks at the restarting of northern Alberta oil, looks at the deterioration in Sino-Taiwanese relations, reports on how Norway is using oil money to buffer its economic shocks, and suggests low ECB rates might contribute to a property boom in Germany.
  • Bloomberg View notes the idea of a third party in the US, one on the right to counter Trump, will go nowhere.
  • The CBC notes the settlement of a residential school case in Newfoundland and Labrador and predicts a terrible fire season.
  • The Globe and Mail‘ Kate Taylor considers Canadian content rules in the 21st century.
  • The Inter Press Service notes that planned Kenyan closures of Somali refugee camps will have terrible results.
  • National Geographic looks at the scourge that is Pablo Escobar’s herd of hippos in Colombia.
  • The National Post notes VIA Rail’s existential need for more funding and reports on Jean Chrétien’s support of decriminalizing marijuana.
  • Open Democracy looks at controversies over Victory Day in Georgia, and notes the general impoverishment of Venezuela.
  • Vice looks at new, accurate dinosaur toys, feathers and all.
  • Wired explains why Israel alone of America’s clients can customize F-35s.

[NEWS] Some Tuesday links

  • Bloomberg notes Petrobras’ dismissal of rumours it is threatened by the impeachment, observes that many Europeans expect a chain reaction of departures if the United Kingdom leaves, notes that a return to high economic growth in Israel will require including the Palestinian minority, and
    looks at Panamanian efforts to convince the world that the country is not a tax haven.
  • The Globe and Mail remembers Mi’kMaq teacher Elsie Basque, and looks at how Mongolia is trying to adapt to the new economy.
  • Bloomberg View states the obvious, noting that an expected event is not a wild swan.
  • CBC notes Rachel Notley’s tour of Fort McMurray.
  • The Inter Press Service notes the denial of everything about the Rohingya.
  • MacLean’s looks at further confusion in Brazil.
  • Open Democracy notes a push for land reform in Paraguay and looks at the devastation of Scotland’s Labour Party.
  • Wired notes the dependence of intelligence agencies on Twitter, proved by Twitter shutting an intermediary down.
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