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Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘israel

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

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  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait answers the question of why asteroids tend to explode high in atmosphere.
  • Centauri Dreams carries Keith Cooper’s suggestion that METI activists should wait until the first generation of detailed exoplanet investigations give an idea as to what is out there before they begin transmitting.
  • The Crux notes how indigenous peoples in Guyana use drones to defend their land claims.
  • JSTOR Daily summarizes an article on the sexually radical and politically progressive Kansas freethinkers, subject even to death threats.
  • The Everyday Sociology Blog considers the question of who benefits from automotion in early 21st century society.
  • Far Outliers notes how, in the Second World War, American missionaries also became interrogators thanks to their knowledge.
  • The Frailest Thing’s Michael Sacasas, linking to an article on #elsagate, notes how many video creators were making content not for human audiences but rather to please YouTube algorithms.
  • Language Log deals with one manifestation of the controversy over the use of “they” as a gender-neutral first-person singular pronoun.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes the terribly suspicious denial of anti-Semitism from Roy Moore’s wife. Alabamans, vote against this man.
  • The LRB Blog shares Gill Partington’s examination of some modern art exhibits dealing with the mechanics of reading.
  • Russell Darnley of maximos62 examines how Human Rights Day, celebrating the Universal Declaration of Human Rights signed on 10 December 1948, is not the only important date in international human rights history.
  • The NYR Daily notes how Donald Trump’s actions have only worsened the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.
  • Cheri Lucas Rowlands shares beautiful photos from a visit to England.
  • Spacing shares an article by Sean Ruthen examining the dynamic difference of the different cities of Italy, based on the author’s recent trip there.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel looks at how young massive black hole J1342+0928 poses a challenge.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how the main demographic challenges for the Baltic States these days are not so much ethnic conflicts but rather population aging and emigration.
  • Arnold Zwicky takes a look at timeless similarities between classics of homoerotic art and modern-day gay photography. NSFW, obviously.
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[NEWS] Three links on frontiers: Liberland, Catalonia, West Bank maps

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  • GQ has a terribly unflattering article about the motivations and personalities behind the establishment of Liberland, a libertarian microstate on an island at the frontiers of Serbia and Croatia.
  • This extended examination of the issue of Catalonian separatism in Spain, taking a look at both sides of the conflicts, suggests this conflict may be intractable. The Atlantic has it.
  • Miriam Berger at Wired notes how the profound insufficiency of maps of the Palestinian-occupied areas of the West Bank forces Palestinians to turn to newcomer maps.me.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

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  • Architectuul considers the humanizing potential of brutalism in the context of a London filled with impersonal skyscrapers.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait looks at the ways the habitable-zone super-Earths of K2-18 reveal our solar system to be exceptional.
  • Centauri Dreams notes evidence for active plate tectonics in the ice crust of Europa, suggesting an ocean being replenished with nutrients and possibly suitable for life.
  • D-Brief notes the sourcing of the iron in the artifacts of the Bronze Act in meteorites.
  • Daily JSTOR reports on how Hollywood coped during the Red Scare of the 1950s.
  • Dangerous Minds notes the exciting discovery of tapes recording Devo jamming with David Bowie and Brian Eno.
  • Cody Delistraty considers if the restitution of artworks looted from once-colonized territories might not be a cheap substitute for deeper changes.
  • Language Hat shares a student essay comparing, during the First World War, the United States’ campaign against German and the German campaign against French.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money argues against a British nostalgia for monarchy and empire that overlooks the real injustices perpetrated at Britain’s imperial peak.
  • Lingua Franca notes the remarkable power of the #metoo movement.
  • The LRB Blog notes the exceptional complexity of the issue of Jerusalem, especially after Trump’s actions.
  • The Map Room Blog shares links to a variety of maps of the Halifax Explosion and its effects.
  • The NYR Daily looks at some of the legacies of the Salvadoran civil war.
  • Peter Watts makes an argument in favour of the dystopia in contemporary science fiction.
  • The Planetary Society Blog’s Emily Lakdawalla reports that South Korea is planning its first Moon expedition for 2020.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer notes that Argentina, at its peak, offered as good or even better chances for social mobility for immigrants than the United States.
  • Peter Rukavina shares a photograph showing the electronic system used by defunct Charlottetown nightclub Myron’s for dispensing drinks.
  • Towleroad reports on one consequence of Australia’s acceptance of gay marriage: Will Calvin Harris remix the Spice Girls song “2 Become 1”, as he promised?
  • Window on Eurasia shares a list of eight reasons explaining why Finland was unique in the former Russian Empire in maintaining its independence from Moscow.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait looks at the emergent evidence for exomoon Kepler-1625b-I.
  • Centauri Dreams looks at the future of technological civilizations: what if they do not always ascend, but stagnate?
  • D-Brief takes issue with the idea of the “digital native.” Everyone needs to adopt new technology at some point.
  • Are Elon Musk and Space-X backing away from the Mars colony plans? The Dragon’s Tales notes.
  • The Map Room Blog links to a map of massacres of Aborigines on the Australian frontiers.
  • Marginal Revolution wonders if widespread roboticization really will increase productivity much.
  • Roads and Kingdoms reports on the traditional rum of Newfoundland.
  • Drew Rowsome likes a new Toronto show, Permanence, in part for its take on male sexuality and sexual presence.
  • The Russian Demographics Blog notes that Russia leads the world in cat ownership.
  • Strange Company reports on coin-collecting 1920 cat Peter Pan Wass.
  • Understanding Society takes a look at the potential conflicts between “contingency” and “explanation.”
  • The Volokh Conspiracy looks at how a Nassau County legislator wants to block a Roger Waters conconcert because of his support for an Israel boycott.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that Chinese outnumber Jews in the Far East’s Jewish Autonomous Oblast. (Not many of both, mind.)

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes a new study suggesting some hypervelocity stars were ejected from the Large Magellanic Cloud.
  • Crooked Timber’s John Holbo wonders how else Trump can transgress the norms of the presidency.
  • The Crux notes the exceptional hardiness of the tardigrade. These forms of life might well outlive the sun.
  • Gizmodo notes the evidence for a recently frozen subsurface ocean on Pluto’s Charon.
  • Joe. My. God. notes the Israeli government’s effective, if confused, opposition to same-sex adoption.
  • Unicorn Booty looks at the significant impact RuPaul’s Drag Race has on music sales.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how Putin’s political allies have been having trouble coming up with a positive future.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • D-Brief considers if gas giant exoplanet Kelt-9b is actually evaporating.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to a paper that considers where to find signs of prior indigenous civilizations in our solar system. (The Moon, Mars, and outer solar system look good.)
  • Joe. My. God. reveals the Israeli nuclear option in the 1967 war.
  • Language Log shares a clip of a Nova Scotia Gaelic folktale about a man named Donald.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes the ongoing deportations of Hispanic undocumented migrants from the United States.
  • The LRB Blog notes the brittle rhetoric of May and the Conservatives.
  • The NYRB Daily mourns the Trump Administration’s plans for American education.
  • Savage Minds considers the world now in the context of the reign of the dangerous nonsense of Neil Postman.
  • Strange Maps shares a map documenting the spread of chess from India to Ireland in a millennium.
  • Window on Eurasia argues that the Russian government needs to do more to protect minority languages.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

  • blogTO notes the rapid expansion of A&Ws across Toronto’s neighbourhoods.
  • Centauri Dreams reports that none of the exoplanets of nearby Wolf 1061 are likely to support Earth-like environments, owing to their eccentric and occasionally overclose orbits.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to a paper looking at high-temperature condensate clouds in hot Jupiter atmospheres.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money reports on Trump’s unsecured Android phone.
  • Language Log reports on Caucasian words relating to tea.
  • The LRB Blog notes the emerging close links connecting May’s United Kingdom with Trump’s United States and Netanyahu’s Israel.
  • Marginal Revolution shares an interview with chef and researcher Mark Miller and reports on the massive scale of Chinese investment in Cambodia.
  • The Planetary Society Blog looks at the idea of choosing between the Moon and Mars as particular targets of manned space exploration.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer looks at the mechanics of imposing a 20% tax in the United States on Mexican imports. (It is doable.)
  • The Russian Demographics Blog reports Russian shortfalls in funding HIV/AIDS medication programs.
  • Supernova Condensate warns that Trump’s hostility to the very idea of climate change threatens the world.
  • Towleroad shares the first gay kiss of (an) Iceman in Marvel’s comics.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy notes the constitutional problems with Trump’s executive order against sanctuary cities.
  • Window on Eurasia argues Ukraine is willing to fight if need be, even if sold out by Trump.