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Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘italy

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

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  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait shares stunning images, from Jupiter, of the Great Red Spot of Jupiter, and analysis.
  • Hornet Stories notes that a reboot of 1980s animation classic She-Ra is coming to Netflix.
  • io9 carries reports suggesting that the new X-Men Dark Phoenix movie is going to have plenty of good female representation. Here’s to hoping. It also notes that the seminal George Lucas short film “Electronic Labyrinth: THX 1138 4EB” is viewable for free online, but only for a short while.
  • Marginal Revolution links to a paper suggesting that IQ score, more than education, is the single biggest factor explaining why a person might become an inventor.
  • The NYR Daily looks at the alliance rightfully called “unholy” between religious militants and the military in Pakistan.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer explains how the strong social networks of Italian migrants in Argentina a century ago helped them eventually do better than native-born Argentines (and Spanish immigrants, too).
  • Roads and Kingdoms notes the simple joys of pupusas, Salvadoran tortillas, on a rainy day in Vancouver.
  • Towleroad reports on interesting research suggesting that gay men are more likely to have older brothers, even suggesting a possible biological mechanism for this.
  • Window on Eurasia notes reports of fights between Russian and Muslim students at Russian centres of higher education.

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[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

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  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait answers the question of why asteroids tend to explode high in atmosphere.
  • Centauri Dreams carries Keith Cooper’s suggestion that METI activists should wait until the first generation of detailed exoplanet investigations give an idea as to what is out there before they begin transmitting.
  • The Crux notes how indigenous peoples in Guyana use drones to defend their land claims.
  • JSTOR Daily summarizes an article on the sexually radical and politically progressive Kansas freethinkers, subject even to death threats.
  • The Everyday Sociology Blog considers the question of who benefits from automotion in early 21st century society.
  • Far Outliers notes how, in the Second World War, American missionaries also became interrogators thanks to their knowledge.
  • The Frailest Thing’s Michael Sacasas, linking to an article on #elsagate, notes how many video creators were making content not for human audiences but rather to please YouTube algorithms.
  • Language Log deals with one manifestation of the controversy over the use of “they” as a gender-neutral first-person singular pronoun.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes the terribly suspicious denial of anti-Semitism from Roy Moore’s wife. Alabamans, vote against this man.
  • The LRB Blog shares Gill Partington’s examination of some modern art exhibits dealing with the mechanics of reading.
  • Russell Darnley of maximos62 examines how Human Rights Day, celebrating the Universal Declaration of Human Rights signed on 10 December 1948, is not the only important date in international human rights history.
  • The NYR Daily notes how Donald Trump’s actions have only worsened the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.
  • Cheri Lucas Rowlands shares beautiful photos from a visit to England.
  • Spacing shares an article by Sean Ruthen examining the dynamic difference of the different cities of Italy, based on the author’s recent trip there.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel looks at how young massive black hole J1342+0928 poses a challenge.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how the main demographic challenges for the Baltic States these days are not so much ethnic conflicts but rather population aging and emigration.
  • Arnold Zwicky takes a look at timeless similarities between classics of homoerotic art and modern-day gay photography. NSFW, obviously.

[ISL] Five Islands links: English in Colombia, Haida, Virgin Islands, Puerto Rico, Sicily

  • Can a new film help preserve the English Creole spoken on the Colombian Caribbean islands of San Andres and Old Providence? The Guardian reports.
  • Using film to help preserve an indigenous language is also a strategy being used by the Haida of Haida Gwaii, in British Columbia. CBC reports.
  • Fredreka Schouten’s account of visiting her native Virgin Islands to see the continued devastation is heart-rending, featured in USA Today.
  • The recovery of agriculture in Puerto Rico is a hopeful sign, but will it be enough? National Geographic reports.
  • Things do not look very good in Sicily. Spiegel reports.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

  • Anthrodendum shares an essay by Yana Stainova talking about restoring a sense of enchantment to ethnography.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait looks at NGTS-1b, a hot Jupiter unusually orbiting a red dwarf star, as does Centauri Dreams.
  • D-Brief looks at how the relativistic jets of matter issuing from central black holes in active galaxies work.
  • Hornet Stories notes an upcoming revival of Boys in the Band by Ryan Murphy, with Zachary Quinto and Matt Bomer.
  • Joe. My. God. notes that 28% of those polled worldwide would favour recriminalizing homosexuality.
  • Language Hat looks at the role played by Italian dialect in games of bocce.
  • Marginal Revolution links to a study examining some of the structural economic failings of socialism in Yugoslavia.
  • Neuroskeptic wonders if there should be a place where people can make use of perfectly good abandoned data sets.
  • Understanding Society looks at the yawning gap between social science theories and actual policies.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how above-average immigrant fertility helps keep birth rates up in Moscow.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

  • Anthropology.net notes evidence that injured Neanderthals were cared for by their kin.
  • James Bow shares a photo of Ottawa at night and considers the growing city with its greenbelt.
  • Centauri Dreams reacts to the immense discoveries surrounding GW170817.
  • Crooked Timber considers the vexed nature of the phrase “Judeo-Christian.”
  • Bruce Dorminey notes an American government study suggesting a North Korean EMP attack could cause collapse.
  • Hornet Stories reports that Russian pop singer Zelimkhan Bakaev has been murdered in Chechnya as part of the anti-gay purges.
  • Language Hat looks at lunfardo, the Italian-inflicted argot of Buenos Aires.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes that, with Trump undermining the US, the prospects of China’s rise to define the new world order are looking good.
  • The NYR Daily looks at reports of significant electoral fraud in Kenya.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw looks at the continuing Australian reaction to China’s Belt and Road project.
  • Roads and Kingdoms reports from Sichuan’s peppercorn fields at harvest time.
  • Drew Rowsome responds to Andrew Pyper’s new novel, The Only Child.
  • Strange Company looks at the mysterious 1900 woman of New Yorker Kathryn Scharn.
  • Strange Maps looks at an ingenious, if flawed, map of the Berlin metro dating from the 1920s.
  • Peter Watts considers the question of individual identity over time. What changes, what stays the same?
  • Window on Eurasia notes that a shift from their native languages to Russian will not end minority ethnic identities.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

  • Anthrodendum features a guest author talking about the need for artificial intelligence’s introduction into our civilization to be managed.
  • Dangerous Minds tells the story of how John Lennon and Yoko Ono met Marshall McLuhan.
  • Cody Delistraty suggests Freud still matters, as a founder and as a pioneer of a new kind of thinking.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze reports on cloud circulation patterns of exoplanet HD 80606b.
  • Far Outliers examines just how Chinese immigration to Southeast Asia, particularly Singapore, became so big.
  • Hornet Stories interviews Moises Serrano, one of the many undocumented queer people victims of the repeal of DACA.
  • Marginal Revolution notes a study suggesting some Indian students have math skills which do not translate into the classroom.
  • The NYR Daily looks at the crackdown on free media in Cambodia.
  • The Planetary Society Blog looks at a new set of recommendations for Canada’s space future by the Space Advisory Board.
  • Roads and Kingdoms reports from Burma, noting the prominence of social media in anti-Rohingya hate.
  • Cheri Lucas Rowlands shares beautiful photos from the Sicilian community of Taormina.
  • Ethan Siegel at Starts With A Bang talks about the mystery of some stars which appear to be older than the universe.
  • Window on Eurasia is critical of a Russian proposal for UN peacekeepers in the Donbas making no mention of Russia.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

  • Bad Astronomy’s Phil Plait notes how the media made a simulation of a third planet at Gliese 832 a discovery of a new Earth-like world.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly calls on a consideration of why schoolchildren are labelled troublemakers.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze notes that 51 Eridani b has been discovered to be a cloudy world, and how.
  • Far Outliers notes how the decline of Temasek (the future Singapore) was followed by the rise of Melaka.
  • Hornet Stories tells of an Orthodox Christian priest in Australia, who, at the funeral of a lesbian, called for gays to be shot.
  • Joe. My. God. notes that Catalonia’s parliament approved a referendum on secession.
  • The LRB Blog considers the import of Monte Testaccio, a man-made hill of rubble and waste dating from Roman times.
  • The NYR Daily considers the engaging and engaged pop art of Grayson Perry.
  • Roads and Kingdoms tells of a lazy afternoon spent drinking New Zealand beer in a Moscow pub.
  • Towleroad notes an upcoming revealing documentary about Grace Jones.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how, in the Donbas wars, mercenaries are becoming a major, potentially destabilizing force.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell looks at the conflict between quantitative data and qualitative stories in politics.