A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘italy

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

  • Anthrodendum recommends design researcher Jan Chipchase’s Field Study Handbook for anthropologists interested in field practice.
  • Architectuul investigates strange similarities between buildings built in far-removed parts of the world.
  • Centauri Dreams takes a look at TESS, the next generation of exoplanet-hunting satellite.
  • Crooked Timber investigates the connections between the spiritualism of the 19th century and the fiction of the uncanny.
  • D-Brief notes the many names, often delightful, that newly-discovered locations on Mercury and Charon have received.
  • Cody Delistraty investigates two exhibitions of French satirists, including Charlie Hedo’s Georges Wolinski, to examine the nature of satire.
  • The Dragon’s Tales considers the possibility of cryomagna leaving marks on the surface of Europa.
  • Drew Ex Machina takes a look at the strangely alien skies of TRAPPIST-1e. What would its sun look like? How would the other planets appear?
  • The Everyday Sociology Blog takes a look at the new prominence of multigenerational households in the United States. While a response to economic strains, it also looks back to past traditions.
  • Hornet Stories notes how, on RuPaul’s Drag Race, Monet X Change gave a decent explanation behind the surprisingly recent birth of the modern British accent.
  • Imageo notes how a massive blob of warm water is rising to the surface of the Pacific.
  • At In A State of Migration, Lyman Stone explores the unique population history of Maine, to my eyes easily the most Atlantic Canadian of the fifty American states.
  • JSTOR Daily links to a paper exploring why modern video games can produce such rewarding experiences for players. (We can get meaning from many places.)
  • Language Log takes a look at the complexity of Chinese language classifications with a song by Yishi Band. What exactly is Yibin Sichuanese?
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money takes a look at an interesting question: When did Jews in the United States become white?
  • The LRB Blog takes a look at the baffling reasons behind the poisoning of the Skribins with Novichok, and the science behind it.
  • Marginal Revolution notes that this year, GDP per capita measured at PPP in Spain is higher than in Italy. (This probably says more about the disarray in Italy.)
  • The NYR Daily shares an interesting interview with cartoonist Art Spiegelman.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw tells of his experiences on a trip to the small Australian city of Armidale, in the region of New England.
  • Justin Petrone reflects on the tidy and clean, minimalist even, rural landscape of Estonia.
  • Progressive Download’s John Farrell notes brain scans that provide evidence of consciousness even in very young infants.
  • Drew Rowsome praises the Toronto production of the musical Fun Home, based on the Alison Bechdel graphic novel. I, for one, can’t wait to see it.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes that, although Proxima Centauri is far too active a star for Proxima Centauri b to be Earth-like, that world could still plausibly host life-supporting environments.
  • Ilya Somin at the Volokh Conspiracy suggests a recent deal at the federal level in the US between Trump and Cory Gardner has created space for states to legalize marijuana without fear of federal intervention.
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[NEWS] Five links on populism: Doug Ford and Ontario, Randy Hillier, California, Italy

  • Sabrina Nanji takes a look at the reasons why the populism of Doug Ford is doing so well this year, over at the Toronto Star.
  • Andrew MacDougall at MacLean’s argues that, to win, Doug Ford needs to find some sort of change that he can champion.
  • Edward Keenan takes a look at the (I would say) nearly ridiculous amount of rural populism Conservative MPP Randy Hillier crams into a single tweet, here at the Toronto Star.
  • John Cassidy at The New Yorker points to the many ways that California, despite Donald Trump, is pointing away from his brand of populism.
  • If, as Foreign Policy suggests, the fragmented and mercurial and populist political scene of Italy is something that will be followed by Europe if not the wider West, we will have problems.

[ISL] Five islands links: Malta/Pantelleria, American Samoa, Chatham Islands, Tasmania, Newfoundland

  • The suggestion of Maltese academic Godfrey Baldacchino that Malta relieve its overcrowding by buying the nearby Italian island of Pantelleria has the advantage of being attention-catching. Malta Today has it.
  • I wish the lawsuit of American Samoans seeking full citizenship in the United States all possible success. NBC News reports.
  • Atlas Obscura takes a look at the distinctive history and culture of the Moriori of the Chatham Islands.
  • Tasmania turns out to be a hugely popular destination for tourists from China. Bloomberg reports.
  • The Newfoundland government’s program of relocating marginal settlements remains hugely controversial. CBC reports.

[MUSIC] Five music links: #toronto100, Depeche Mode, Giampiero Riggio, old iPods, pop vs rock

  • We’ve got 15 more notable Toronto-related songs that did not quite make the shortlist for the #toronto100, over at the Toronto Star.
  • This article on a dad who has a Depeche Mode covers band with his children is adorable. VICE reports.
  • What happened to Giampiero Riggio, Italy’s answer to Bon Iver? Vice reports.
  • This James Bareham article at The Verge about how, rediscovering his 2002-era iPoD, he reacquainted himself with his preferred music of the period, is very readable.
  • Alan Cross writes at Global News about the idea of a thirteen-year cycle, in which pop alternates with rock. Are we up for a rock-heavy moment?

Written by Randy McDonald

March 22, 2018 at 11:45 pm

[NEWS] Seven LGBTQ links: Love Simon, Toronto, recipes, Italy, former Soviet Union, Obama

  • NOW Toronto gives a glowing review to Love, Simon, one that praises the film for its quality and for its importance.
  • CBC reports on how Toronto police seem to have badly mishandled Abdulbasir Faizi.
  • The inquiry into the alleged McArthur murders most definitely should be independent of police chief Saunders. NOW Toronto reportsA.
  • This story of how a recipe for pickled cucumbers survived the AIDS epidemic of the 1980s is powerful. Taste Cooking has it.
  • The way in which LGBTQ rights became a hot political issue in the recent Italian elections is not good. Open Democracy reports.
  • The politicization of homophobia across the former Soviet Union is horrible. Open Democracy reports.
  • Why do so many people on the American right insist that Obama is gay? VICE reports.

[PHOTO] Bedroom from the Sagredo Palace, Venice, circa 1718 (@metmuseum)

Bedroom from the Sagredo Palace, Venice, circa 1718 #newyorkcity #newyork #manhattan #metmuseum #venice #sagredo #latergram

Written by Randy McDonald

March 16, 2018 at 11:45 am

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

  • At Anthropology.net, Kambiz Kamrani notes the Qesem caves of Israel, where four hundred thousand years ago hominids learned to make tools.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes that star S2 is about to plunge to its closest approach to Sagittarius A*, the black hole at the heart of our galaxy, and what this means for science.
  • Centauri Dreams takes a look at research done on Earth about the atmospheres of super-Earths.
  • D-Brief takes a look at the recent research done on the regions on the edges of supermassive black holes.
  • Bruce Dorminey notes that the Juno science team thinks that Jupiter probe has exceeded expectations.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes the evidence for a massive migration from the steppes into Europe circa 3300 BCE.
  • The Frailest Thing’s Michael Sacasas makes the argument that the idea of humane technology is something of an oxymoron.
  • Imageo notes evidence that permafrost will melt more quickly than previous predicted under the impact of global warming.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at explanations for the unusually strong activism among high school students in East Los Angeles in the 1960s.
  • Language Hat looks at evidence for the close relationship, in vocabulary and even in grammar, between the Turkish and Western Armenian languages now separated by bad blood.
  • Lingua Franca notes how easy it is to change conventions on language use–like pronouns, say–at a well-functioning institution.
  • Marginal Revolution looks at the economic progress made, after a recent lull, by Ghana.
  • The NYR Daily looks at the growing involvement of the United States in small wars in Africa, starting with Niger and Cameroon.
  • Justin Petrone at north! reports on a family visit to his ancestral home of Bari, seeing what little remains of the past there.
  • Peter Rukavina wonders, apropos of a very successful experience shopping online at Amazon, how anyone else will be able to compete.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel considers the difference between mathematics and physics. Where is the line to be drawn?
  • Strange Maps’ Frank Jacobs maps obesity in the United States and in Europe.
  • Towleroad reports on the apparent interest of actor Cynthia Nixon in becoming governor of New York.
  • John Scalzi at Whatever is a big fan of A Wrinkle in Time, a movie that is not perfect but is still quite good. I’m curious to see it myself.
  • Window on Eurasia reports on food riots in isolated Turkmenistan.