A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘italy

[BLOG] Some Friday links

  • Anthrodendum features a guest author talking about the need for artificial intelligence’s introduction into our civilization to be managed.
  • Dangerous Minds tells the story of how John Lennon and Yoko Ono met Marshall McLuhan.
  • Cody Delistraty suggests Freud still matters, as a founder and as a pioneer of a new kind of thinking.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze reports on cloud circulation patterns of exoplanet HD 80606b.
  • Far Outliers examines just how Chinese immigration to Southeast Asia, particularly Singapore, became so big.
  • Hornet Stories interviews Moises Serrano, one of the many undocumented queer people victims of the repeal of DACA.
  • Marginal Revolution notes a study suggesting some Indian students have math skills which do not translate into the classroom.
  • The NYR Daily looks at the crackdown on free media in Cambodia.
  • The Planetary Society Blog looks at a new set of recommendations for Canada’s space future by the Space Advisory Board.
  • Roads and Kingdoms reports from Burma, noting the prominence of social media in anti-Rohingya hate.
  • Cheri Lucas Rowlands shares beautiful photos from the Sicilian community of Taormina.
  • Ethan Siegel at Starts With A Bang talks about the mystery of some stars which appear to be older than the universe.
  • Window on Eurasia is critical of a Russian proposal for UN peacekeepers in the Donbas making no mention of Russia.
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[BLOG] Some Thursday links

  • Bad Astronomy’s Phil Plait notes how the media made a simulation of a third planet at Gliese 832 a discovery of a new Earth-like world.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly calls on a consideration of why schoolchildren are labelled troublemakers.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze notes that 51 Eridani b has been discovered to be a cloudy world, and how.
  • Far Outliers notes how the decline of Temasek (the future Singapore) was followed by the rise of Melaka.
  • Hornet Stories tells of an Orthodox Christian priest in Australia, who, at the funeral of a lesbian, called for gays to be shot.
  • Joe. My. God. notes that Catalonia’s parliament approved a referendum on secession.
  • The LRB Blog considers the import of Monte Testaccio, a man-made hill of rubble and waste dating from Roman times.
  • The NYR Daily considers the engaging and engaged pop art of Grayson Perry.
  • Roads and Kingdoms tells of a lazy afternoon spent drinking New Zealand beer in a Moscow pub.
  • Towleroad notes an upcoming revealing documentary about Grace Jones.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how, in the Donbas wars, mercenaries are becoming a major, potentially destabilizing force.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell looks at the conflict between quantitative data and qualitative stories in politics.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

  • Centauri Dreams shares, from JPL, the schedule for Cassini in its last days of existence. Goodbye, dear probe.
  • Dangerous Minds shares some classic illustrations from a Persian book called Lights of Canopus.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to a paper suggesting that gas giants can stabilize debris disks.
  • Far Outliers shares excerpts from the diary of a Japanese soldier fighting in New Guinea in the Second World War.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes the real suffering that high rents impose on the poor in American cities.
  • The Map Room Blog shares some nice X-ray maps of New York City subway stations.
  • The Planetary Society Blog shares more vintage Voyager photos of the outer solar system: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune …
  • Roads and Kingdoms tells of the marvelous cookies made on the dying Venetian island of Burano.
  • Drew Rowsome considers, at length and with personal references, the differences between “art” and “porn”. NSFW.
  • Understanding Society considers the latest thinking on causal mechanisms in modern sociology.
  • Window on Eurasia wonders if non-Russian languages in Russia are attacked out of anxiety over Russian’s own decline, and speculates that if integration of mostly Muslim immigrants goes poorly in Moscow, the city could get locked in sectarian conflict.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

  • Anthropology.net reports on new evidence that Homo naledi may have used tools, buried their dead, and lived alongside Homo sapiens.
  • Centauri Dreams remembers an abortive solar sail mission to Halley’s Comet.
  • Dangerous Minds shares photos of the “Apache” dancers of France.
  • Cody Delistraty writes about Swedish futurist Anders Sandberg and his efforts to plan for humanity’s future.
  • At the Everyday Sociology Blog, Karen Sternheimer talks about her day as a sociologist.
  • Joe. My. God. notes the good news that normal young HIV patients can now expect near-normal life expectancies.
  • Language Hat looks at a recent surge of interest in Italian dialects.
  • Language Log looks at the phenomenon of East Asians taking English-language names.
  • The LRB Blog considers the dynamics of the United Kingdom’s own UDI.
  • Marginal Revolution looks at the existential issues of a growing Kinshasa still disconnected from the wider world.
  • Steve Munro notes that Metrolinx will now buy vehicles from France’s Alstom.
  • The New APPS Blog uses Foucault to look at the “thanatopolitics” of the Republicans.
  • The NYRB Daily looks at Trump’s constitutional crisis.
  • Out There considers the issues surrounding the detection of an alien civilization less advanced than ours.
  • The Planetary Society Blog looks at the United States’ planetary science exploration budget.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer looks at Argentina’s underrated reputation as a destination for foreign investment.
  • Progressive Download shares some thinking about sexual orientation in the context of evolution.
  • Peter Rukavina looks at the success of wind energy generation on the Island.
  • Understanding Society takes a look at the dynamics of Rome.
  • Window on Eurasia shares a lunatic Russian scheme for a partition of eastern Europe between Russia and Germany.

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

  • Language Hat reports on the Wenzhounese of Italy.
  • Language Log writes about the tones of Cantonese.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money writes about the costs of law school. (They are significant, and escalating hugely.)
  • Marginal Revolution reports on the problems facing the Brazilian pension system, perhaps overgenerous for a relatively poor country facing rapid aging.
  • Neuroskeptic reports on the latest re: the crisis of scientists not being able to replicate evidence, now even their own work being problematic.
  • Personal Reflections considers the questions of how to preserve the dignity of people facing Alzheimer’s.
  • The Russian Demographics Blog notes a Financial Times article looking at the impact of aging on global real estate.
  • Spacing Toronto talks about the campaign to name a school after Jean Earle Geeson, a teacher and activist who helped save Fort York.
  • At Wave Without A Shore, C.J. Cherryh shares photos of her goldfish.
  • Window on Eurasia notes growing instability in Daghestan, looks at the latest in Georgian historical memory, and shares an article arguing that Putin’s actions have worsened Russia’s reputation catastrophically.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

  • Centauri Dreams looks at the SPECULOOS red dwarf observation program.
  • The Crux examines VX nerve agent, the chemical apparently used to assassinate the half-brother of North Korea’s ruler.
  • Dangerous Minds shares photos of the inhabitants of the Tokyo night, like gangsters and prostitutes and drag queens.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money examines Donald Trump’s tepid and belated denunciation of anti-Semitism.
  • Language Log looks at the story of the Wenzhounese, a Chinese group notable for its diaspora in Italy.
  • The LRB Blog looks at the by-elections in the British ridings of Stoke and Copeland and notes the problems of labour.
  • The Map Room Blog shares a post-Brexit map of the European Union with an independent Scotland.
  • Marginal Revolution reports that a border tax would be a poor idea for the United States and Mexico.
  • The NYRB Daily looks at the art of the medieval Tibetan kingdom of Guge.
  • Otto Pohl notes the 73rd anniversary of Stalin’s deportation of the Chechens and the Ingush.
  • Supernova Condensate points out that Venus is actually the most Earth-like planet we know of. Why do we not explore it more?
  • Towleroad notes Depeche Mode’s denunciation of the alt-right and Richard Spencer.
  • Whatever’s John Scalzi considers the question of feeling empathy for horrible people.
  • Window on Eurasia notes the thousands of Russian citizens involved with ISIS and examines the militarization of Kaliningrad.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

  • blogTO shares some secrets about the TTC.
  • Centauri Dreams notes how exoplanet HAT-P-2b somehow induces pulsations in its parent star.
  • Citizen Science Salon looks at a new crowdsourcing effort to find Planet Nine from old WISE images.
  • Dangerous Minds reports on a marijuana bouquet delivery service.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze reports on the detection of the atmosphere of super-Earth Gliese 1132b./li>
  • Language Hat examines the different source languages for neologisms in Russian.
  • Language Log reports on an obscene Valentine’s Day ad from Sichuan.
  • The LRB Blog reports on the search of Syrians in Istanbul for health care.
  • Marginal Revolution reports on the fascist experimentations of economist Franco Modigliani.
  • The NYRB Daily reports on the stunning war art of Paul Nash.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that non-Russian republics tend to have better health indicators than the average, and warns of the potential instability that could be triggered by the failure of Putin’s vision for Trump.