A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘jordan peterson

[URBAN NOTE] Seven Toronto links: High Park, rent, Sri Lanka, vertical farm, Zizek vs Peterson

  • The cherry blossoms of High Park are expected to start blooming earlier than expected, perhaps reaching peak bloom in a week’s time. blogTO reports.
  • blogTO notes that someone was trying to rent out a bed in an occupied apartment for a rent of $C 600 a month.
  • A Toronto Star investigation reveals the prominence of ghost hotels, enabled by Airbnb, in making the rental housing market that much more difficult.
  • At NOW Toronto, Liam Barrington-Bush considers what renters in Toronto can learn from their activist counterparts in Berlin and Barcelona.
  • Aparita Bhandari wrote at The Discourse about how Sri Lankans living in Scarborough responded to the recent terrible bombings.
  • blogTO writes about the new vertical farm set to be built at University of Toronto’s Scarborough campus.
  • The VICE account of the debate between Slavoj Zizek and Jordan Peterson reveals much.

[URBAN NOTE] Five Toronto links: TTC, parliament, Queens Quay, Jordan Peterson

  • Christopher Hume’s sarcastic “praise” of the TTC as the better way since it gives people plenty of time to sit and do nothing, over at the Toronto Star, is notable.
  • Steve Munro takes a look at service on the 501L bus route on Queen west to Long Branch.
  • John Lorinc writes at the Toronto Star about the discovery of Ontario’s first parliament beneath a car lot at Front and Parliament, and what people are doing to publicize knowledge of this site.
  • The TTC will be putting up a gate at the Queens Quay subway tunnel after yet another driver drove their vehicle into the streetcar route.
  • Vinay Menon’s extended take in the Toronto Star on Jordan Peterson is weirdly compelling. What will Peterson do next?

[BLOG] Some Friday links

  • At Anthropology.net, Kamzib Kamrani looks at the Yamnaya horse culture of far eastern Europe and their connection to the spread of the Indo-Europeans.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait looks at the predicted collision of China’s Tiangong-1 space station. Where will it fall?
  • James Bow notes a Kickstarter funding effort to revive classic Canadian science fiction magazine Amazing Stories.
  • Centauri Dreams notes the impending retirement of the pioneering Kepler telescope, and what’s being done in the time before this retirement.
  • D-Brief notes how nanowires made of gold and titanium were used to restore the sight of blind mice.
  • Russell Darnley takes a look at the indigenous people of Riau province, the Siak, who have been marginalized by (among other things) the Indonesian policy of transmigration.
  • Dead Things reports on more evidence of Denisovan ancestry in East Asian populations, with the suggestion that the trace of Denisovan ancestry in East Asia came from a different Denisovan population than the stronger traces in Melanesia.
  • Hornet Stories paints a compelling portrait of the West Texas oasis-like community of Marfa.
  • JSTOR Daily notes how indigenous mythology about illness was used to solve a hantavirus outbreak in New Mexico in the 1990s.
  • Language Log praises the technical style of a Google Translate translation of a text from German to English.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes that, under the Shah, Iran was interested in building nuclear plants. Iranian nuclear aspirations go back a long way.
  • The LRB Blog looks at the unsettling elements of the literary, and other, popularity of Jordan Peterson.
  • Marginal Revolution notes the continuing existence of a glass ceiling even in relatively egalitarian Iceland.
  • The NYR Daily looks at the unsettling elements behind the rise of Xi Jinping to unchecked power. Transitions from an oligarchy to one-man rule are never good for a country, never mind one as big as China.
  • Drew Rowsome writes about Love, Cecil, a new film biography of photographer Cecil Beaton.
  • Peter Rukavina celebrates the 25th anniversary of his move to Prince Edward Island. That province, my native one, is much the better for his having moved there. Congratulations!
  • Window on Eurasia looks at a strange story of Russian speculation about Kazakh pan-Turkic irredentism for Orenburg that can be traced back to one of its own posts.
  • At Worthwhile Canadian Initiative, Frances Woolley takes the time to determine that Canadian university professors tend to be more left-wing than the general Canadian population, and to ask why this is the case.

[NEWS] Five notes on cultural change: Jordan Peterson, blogging under ISIS, India, Canadian drama

  • NOW Toronto observes that U of T professor Jordan Peterson is directly threatening other members of the academic community to which he belongs.
  • VICE reports on how an Iraqi in Mosul managed to maintain an ISIS-critical blog while under ISIS rule.
  • Mihir Sharma notes, for Bloomberg View, that Indian education needs to be vastly improved if India is to take off.
  • This exploration of the reasons why Canadian playwrights are big in Japan is fascinating. (Translator Tohoshi Yoshihara is a huge fan.) NOW Toronto explores.