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Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘jordan tannahill

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • Charlie Stross hosts at Antipope another discussion thread examining Brexit.
  • Architectuul takes a look at five overlooked mid-20th century architects.
  • Bad Astronomy shares a satellite photo of auroras at night over the city lights of the Great Lakes basin and something else, too.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly writes about the directions love has taken her, and wonders where it might have taken her readers.
  • Centauri Dreams reports on the Hayabusa 2 impactor on asteroid Ryugu.
  • John Quiggin at Crooked Timber takes issue with the claims of Steven Pinker about nuclear power.
  • D-Brief notes the detection, in remarkable detail, of a brilliant exocomet at Beta Pictoris.
  • The Dragon’s Tales considers the possibility that China might be building a military base in Cambodia.
  • Karen Sternheimer writes at the Everyday Sociology Blog about the importance of small social cues, easily overlookable tough they are.
  • Far Outliers notes the role of Japan’s imperial couple, Akihito and Michiko, in post-war Japan.
  • L.M. Sacasas at The Frailest Thing writes about the potential inadequacy of talking about values.
  • Gizmodo notes a new study suggesting the surprising and potentially dangerous diversity of bacteria present on the International Space Station.
  • Mark Graham shares a link to a paper, and its abstract, examining what might come of the creation of a planetary labour market through the gig economy.
  • Hornet Stories takes a look at Red Ribbon Blues, a 1995 AIDS-themed film starring RuPaul.
  • io9 notes that Guillermo del Toro and Cornelia Funke are co-writing a Pan’s Labyrinth novel scheduled for release later this year.
  • Joe. My. God. notes a new study suggesting 20% of LGBTQ Americans live in rural areas.
  • JSTOR Daily takes a look at the Bluestockings, the grouping of 18th century women in England who were noteworthy scholars and writers.
  • Language Hat notes an ambitious new historical dictionary of the Arabic language being created by the emirate of Sharjah.
  • Language Log examines, in the aftermath of a discussion of trolls, different cultures’ terms for different sorts of arguments.
  • Erik Loomis at Lawyers, Guns and Money notes how early forestry in the United States was inspired by socialist ideals.
  • The Map Room Blog links to a map showing the different national parks of the United Kingdom.
  • Alex Tabarrok at Marginal Revolution, noting the new findings from the Chixculub impact, notes how monitoring asteroids to prevent like catastrophes in the future has to be a high priority.
  • The New APPS Blog explains how data, by its very nature, is so easily made into a commodity.
  • The NYR Daily considers the future of the humanities in a world where higher education is becoming preoccupied by STEM.
  • Corey S. Powell at Out There interviews Bear Grylls about the making of his new documentary series Hostile Planet.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw considers the pleasures of birds and of birdwatching.
  • Jason C. Davis at the Planetary Society Blog noted the arrival of the Beresheet probe in lunar orbit.
  • Drew Rowsome reviews the new amazing-sounding play Angelique at the Factory Theatre.
  • The Russian Demographics Blog notes a paper that makes the point of there being no automatic relationship between greater gender equality and increases in fertility.
  • The Signal looks at how the Library of Congress has made use of the BagIt programming language in its archiving of data.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel comes up with questions to ask plausible visitors from other universes.
  • Strange Company notes the mysterious deaths visited on three members of a British family in the early 20th century. Who was the murderer? Was there even a crime?
  • Towleroad notes the activists, including Canadian-born playwright Jordan Tannahill, who disrupted a high tea at the Dorchester Hotel in London over the homophobic law passed by its owner, the Sultan of Brunei.
  • Window on Eurasia notes rising instability in Ingushetia.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell notes that the British surveillance of Huawei is revealing the sorts of problems that must be present in scrutiny-less Facebook, too.

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

  • Crooked Timber seeks advice for academics trying to publish general-interest books.
  • The Frailest Thing’s Michael Sacasas considers the extent, and the way, in which technological change can outstrip the ability of cultures and institutions to manage this change.
  • Hornet Stories notes the many ways in which the Trump Presidency is proving to be terrible for HIV-positive people around the world.
  • Sara Jaffe at JSTOR Daily explores the concept of queer time. What is time like for queer people if the traditional markers of adulthood–marriage, children, and so on–are unavailable? How do they think of life stages?
  • Language Log looks at the complexities of language in Hong Kong under Chinese rule.
  • Drew Rowsome reports on the latest theatre piece of Jordan Tannahill, Declarations.
  • Window on Eurasia reports on declining flows of migrants from elsewhere in the former Soviet Union to Russia.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

  • Charlie Stross at Antipope tells us how bizarre he finds reality, in its content and in its delivery. Certainly, it undermines for him the utility of the storytelling methods he first used.
  • Centauri Dreams notes a new effort to separate superjovian planets from brown dwarfs, suggesting the dividing line between planetary and stellar formation is drawn at 10 Jupiter masses.
  • Dangerous Minds praises St. Vincent, aka Annie Clark, as a brilliant musician and live performer who should be seen on her most recent tour.
  • Hornet Stories talks about the way out queer male pop musicians, like Casey Spooner and Frank Ocean, are becoming more out about their sexuality and their forthright self-presentation in ways traditionally limited to use by women.
  • JSTOR Daily suggests that, in Indonesia, post-Suharto trade liberalization has led to a direct surge in men smoking cigarettes.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money links to an article suggesting how the 19th century American perception of China as a trade partner was driven by a romanticism.
  • Washington D.C., Marginal Revolution reports, stands out as a city where economists far outnumber clerics.
  • Roads and Kingdoms considers the difficulty of being a vegetarian or vegan in the Nigerian metropolis of Lagos.
  • Drew Rowsome praises Liminal, the new biography by Toronto playwright and general creator Jordan Tannahill.
  • At Strange Maps, Frank Jacobs shares an infographic illustrating the various investments and projects of Elon Musk.
  • Towleroad links to a trailer for the new version of classic gay play Boys in the Band, starring out stars. This is going to be an interesting show, I think, especially as it is updated (and as it might not need updating).
  • Window on Eurasia notes the deep hostility of some Russians to the permanent settlement of immigrants–Central Asians here, also Chinese–in rural Russia, in the iconic village. I have to saying, knowing what I know about PEI, this sounds a bit familiar.