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Posts Tagged ‘jupiter

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

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  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait shares some stunning photos of the polar regions of Jupiter, from Juno.
  • Centauri Dreams notes speculation on how antimatter could be harnessed for space propulsion.
  • D-Brief notes how nanotechnological design is used to create tools capable of extracting water from the air above the Atacama.
  • Russell Darnley notes the continuing peat fires in Sumatra’s Riau Province.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes evidence of an ancient cultural diffusion, from Copper Age Iberia, apparently not accompanied by gene flows.
  • Mark Graham links to a paper he co-authored looking at the viability of online work as an option, or not, in the Global South.
  • Hornet Stories notes an upcoming documentary about Harlem fashion figure Dapper Dan.
  • JSTOR Daily notes the surprising controversy around the practice of keeping crickets as pets, for entertainments including music and bloodsports.
  • Language Log looks at the extent to which Xi Jinping actually has been identified as a Tibetan bodhisattva.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes the extent to which Mexican society has also experienced negative effects from NAFTA, in ways perhaps not unfamiliar to Americans.
  • Lingua Franca considers the usage of the term “blockbuster”.
  • Neuroskeptic notes a new paper suggesting there is no neurogenesis in adult humans.
  • The NYR Daily features an eyewitness description of a botched execution in Alabama. This one does indeed seem to be particularly barbaric.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer notes the rise of dictatorship worldwide.
  • Roads and Kingdoms <U?considers the simple joys of chilaquiles sandwiches in Guadalajara.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes the vast bumber of starless planets, rogue planets, out there in the universe.
  • Worthwhile Canadian Initiative notes the fact, and the political import of the fact, that public-sector wages in Ontario are higher than private-sector ones.
  • Window on Eurasia notes the continuing decline of the Russian village, not helped by recent changes in policy under Putin.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell notes the difference, in business, between pre- and post-funding investments.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

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  • At Anthropology.net, Kambiz Kamrani notes the Qesem caves of Israel, where four hundred thousand years ago hominids learned to make tools.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes that star S2 is about to plunge to its closest approach to Sagittarius A*, the black hole at the heart of our galaxy, and what this means for science.
  • Centauri Dreams takes a look at research done on Earth about the atmospheres of super-Earths.
  • D-Brief takes a look at the recent research done on the regions on the edges of supermassive black holes.
  • Bruce Dorminey notes that the Juno science team thinks that Jupiter probe has exceeded expectations.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes the evidence for a massive migration from the steppes into Europe circa 3300 BCE.
  • The Frailest Thing’s Michael Sacasas makes the argument that the idea of humane technology is something of an oxymoron.
  • Imageo notes evidence that permafrost will melt more quickly than previous predicted under the impact of global warming.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at explanations for the unusually strong activism among high school students in East Los Angeles in the 1960s.
  • Language Hat looks at evidence for the close relationship, in vocabulary and even in grammar, between the Turkish and Western Armenian languages now separated by bad blood.
  • Lingua Franca notes how easy it is to change conventions on language use–like pronouns, say–at a well-functioning institution.
  • Marginal Revolution looks at the economic progress made, after a recent lull, by Ghana.
  • The NYR Daily looks at the growing involvement of the United States in small wars in Africa, starting with Niger and Cameroon.
  • Justin Petrone at north! reports on a family visit to his ancestral home of Bari, seeing what little remains of the past there.
  • Peter Rukavina wonders, apropos of a very successful experience shopping online at Amazon, how anyone else will be able to compete.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel considers the difference between mathematics and physics. Where is the line to be drawn?
  • Strange Maps’ Frank Jacobs maps obesity in the United States and in Europe.
  • Towleroad reports on the apparent interest of actor Cynthia Nixon in becoming governor of New York.
  • John Scalzi at Whatever is a big fan of A Wrinkle in Time, a movie that is not perfect but is still quite good. I’m curious to see it myself.
  • Window on Eurasia reports on food riots in isolated Turkmenistan.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

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  • At Anthropology.net, Kambiz Kamrani notes evidence that Australopithecus africanus suffered the same sorts of dental issues as modern humans.
  • Architectuul considers, in the specific context of Portugal, a project by architects seeking to create new vehicles and new designs to enable protest.
  • Bad Astronomy’s Phil Plait looks at HD 34445, a Sun-like star somewhat older than our own that has two gas giants within its circumstellar habitable zone. Could these worlds have moons which could support life?
  • James Bow celebrates Osgoode as Gold, the next installment in the Toronto Comics anthology of local stories.
  • At Crooked Timber, Henry Farrell in the wake of Italian elections revisits the idea of post-democratic politics, of elections which cannot change things.
  • D-Brief notes that monkeys given ayahuasca seem to have been thereby cured of their depression. Are there implications for humans, here?
  • Dangerous Minds notes the facekini, apparently a popular accessory for Chinese beach-goers.
  • Imageo notes the shocking scale of snowpack decline in the western United States, something with long-term consequences for water supplies.
  • JSTOR Daily notes a paper suggesting that the cultivation of coffee does not harm–perhaps more accurately, need not harm–biodiversity.
  • Robert Farley at Lawyers, Guns and Money notes the potential of the United States to start to extricate itself from the ongoing catastrophe in Yemen.
  • The NYR Daily features an interview with photographer Dominique Nabokov about her photos of living rooms.
  • Drew Rowsome writes a mostly-positive review of the new drama Rise, set around a high school performance of Spring Awakening. If only the lead, the drama teacher behind the production, was not straight-washed.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel makes the case that there are only three major types of planets, Terran and Neptunian and Jovian.
  • Towleroad notes the awkward coming out of actor Lee Pace.
  • Worthwhile Canadian Initiative suggests one way to try to limit the proliferation of guns would be to engineer in planned obsolescence, at least ensuring turnover.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell U>notes that one of his suggestions, ensuring that different national governments should have access to independent surveillance satellites allowing them to accurately evaluate situations on the ground, is in fact being taken up.

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

  • The Buzz, over at the Toronto Public Library, recommends some audiobooks, here.
  • Centauri Dreams features an essay, by Kostas Konstantindis, exploring how near-future technology could be used to explore the oceans of Europa and Enceladus for life.
  • Far Outliers takes a look at the many languages used in Persia circa 500 BCE.
  • Hornet Stories notes that Fox News has retracted a bizarrely homophobic op-ed on the Olympics by one of its executives.
  • JSTOR Daily explores what is really involved in the rumours of J. Edgar Hoover and cross-dressing.
  • Language Hat, in exploring Zadie Smith, happens upon the lovely word “cernuous”.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money links to an article, and starts a discussion, regarding the possibility of a North Korean victory early in the Korean War. What would have happened next?
  • The NYR Daily notes that Donald Trump is helping golf get a horrible reputation.
  • Supernova Condensate examines the science-fiction trope of artificial intelligence being dangerous, and does not find much substance behind the myth. If anything, the direction of the fear should lie in the other direction.
  • Understanding Society’s Daniel Little looks at two books which consider the origins of the Cold War from an international relations perspective. What were the actors trying to achieve?
  • Window on Eurasia makes the argument that the powerful clan structures of post-Soviet Dagestan are not primordial in origin, but rather represent attempts to cope with state failure in that Russian republic.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell looks at the existential problems facing Capita from a Coasian perspective. How is its business model fundamentally broken?
  • Arnold Zwicky, in taking apart an overcorrection, explains the differences between “prone” and “supine.”

[BLOG] Some Friday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait takes a look at how contemporary lunar probes are prospecting for ice deposits on the dry Moon.
  • Centauri Dreams notes new models for the evolution of the orbit of the early Moon, and how this could well have influence the environment of the young Earth.
  • Crooked Timber takes issue with the idea that sponsoring women’s entrepreneurship, rooted in the belief that women are limited by their income, is enough to deal with deeper gender inequity.
  • D-Brief notes that a brain implant–specifically, one making use of deep brain stimulation–actually can significantly improve memory in implantees.
  • Gizmodo notes that extrasolar objects like ‘Oumuamua may well have played a significant role in interstellar panspermia, introducing life from one system to another.
  • At In A State of Migration, Lyman Stone does the work and finds out that the Amish are not, in fact, destined to eventually repopulate the US, that despite high fertility rates Amish fertility rates have consistently fell over time, influenced by external issues like the economy.
  • JSTOR Daily has a thought-provoking essay taking a look at the feedback loops between envy and social media. Does social media encourage too narrow a realm of human achievements to be valued?
  • Language Hat notes a new book, Giorgio Van Straten’s In Search of Lost Books, noting all those texts which once existed but have since gone missing.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money, noting the strongly negative reaction to Katie Roiphe’s essay in Harper’s against feminism, takes care to note that “disagreement” is not at all the same thing as “silencing”.
  • The NYR Daily looks at the many ways in which Sweden has been taken as a symbol for progressivism, and the reasons why some on the right look so obsessively for signs that it is failing.
  • At the Planetary Society Blog, Casey Dreier writes about the ways in which the Falcon Heavy, if it proves to be as inexpensive as promised, could revolutionize the exploration of (for instance) outer system ocean worlds like Europa and Enceladus.
  • Drew Rowsome quite likes Rumours, a performance of the famous Fleetwood Mac album of that name, at Toronto’s Coal Mine Theatre.

[NEWS] Some sci-tech links: DNA tests, stars, Europa and Enceladus, driverless trucks, Voynich

  • Bloomberg notes the impending commercial introduction of DNA tests that can be used to recommend particular diets for customers.
  • The Gaia satellite found a vast cluster of stars hidden by our bright neighbour Sirius. Universe Today reports.
  • Icy worlds like Europa and Enceladus, famous for their subsurface water oceans, might have surfaces too fluffy for probes to land safely. Universe Today reports.
  • The introduction of driverless trucks at the Suncor tar sands developments in Alberta will save on wear and tear, but will also cost 400 jobs. The Toronto Star reports.
  • This claim that University of Alberta researchers have decrypted the Voynich manuscript and found it written in a variant of Hebrew seems, perhaps, optimistic. The National Post reports.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

  • Anthropology.net notes that the discovery of an ancient Homo sapiens jawbone in Israel pushes back the history of our species by quite a bit.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait shares stunning photos of spiral galaxy NGC 1398.
  • Centauri Dreams considers the ways in which the highly reflective surface of Europa might be misleading to probes seeking to land on its surface.
  • The Dragon’s Tales rounds up more information about extrasolar visitor ‘Oumuamua.
  • Far Outliers considers the staggering losses, human and territorial and strategic, of Finland in the Winter War.
  • Hornet Stories notes preliminary plans to set up an original sequel to Call Me Be Your Name later in the 1980s, in the era of AIDS.
  • Russell Arben Fox at In Media Res considers if Wichita will be able to elect a Wichitan as governor of Kansas, for the first time in a while.
  • io9 takes a look at the interesting ways in which Star Wars and Star Trek have been subverting traditional audience assumptions about these franchises.
  • JSTOR Daily links to a paper examining what decision-makers in North Vietnam were thinking on the eve of the Tet offensive, fifty years ago.
  • The LRB Blog takes a look at a new book examining the 1984 IRA assassination attempt against Margaret Thatcher.
  • The Map Room Blog links to an article examining how school districts, not just electoral districts, can be products of gerrymandering.
  • Marginal Revolution seeks suggestions for good books to explain Canada to non-Canadians, and comes up with a shortlist of its own.
  • Kenan Malik at the NYR Daily takes a look at contemporary efforts to justify the British Empire as good for its subjects. Who is doing this, and why?