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Posts Tagged ‘jupiter

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

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  • Anthropology.net notes that the analysis of a Neanderthal skeleton from Croatia reveals much common ancestry.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait shares some stunning photos of Jupiter taken by the Juno probe.
  • Crooked Timber considers the differences–such as they are–between science fiction and fantasy literature.
  • After a conversation with Adam Gopnik, Cody Delistraty makes a case for the importance of high-brow culture.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze notes a paper arguing that Earth-like planets can exist even without active plate tectonics.
  • The Frailest Thing’s Michael Sacasas argues that operating systems relying on instinct hurt human thought.
  • Language Log considers Twitter post limits for East Asian languages.
  • The LRB Blog considers trench fever and the future of nursing in the United Kingdom.
  • Marginal Revolution links to a study suggesting people actively look out for bad and threatening news items.
  • The NYR Daily examines the reasons why Uber ended up getting banned by the city of London.
  • Drew Rowsome reports on an exciting new staging at the Paramount Theatre of Salt-Water Moon.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel looks at the very low proportion of planets in studied exosystems actually detected by Kepler.
  • Strange Company tells the story of John Banvard, a 19th century American who lost everything in mounting panorama exhibitions.
  • Towleroad reports on how PREP contributed to an 80% fall in new HIV diagnoses in London and wider England.
  • Window on Eurasia notes the worsening of HIV/AIDS in Russia, aided by terrible government policy and bad statistics.
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[BLOG] Some Monday links

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  • Centauri Dreams links to archival video painstakingly collected from the Voyager missions.
  • Citizen Science Salon notes ways ordinary people can use satellite imagery for archaeological purposes.
  • Good news: Asian carp can’t find a fin-hold in Lake Michigan. Bad news: The lake is so food-deprived nothing lives there. The Crux reports.
  • D-Brief notes that, once every second, a fast radio burst occurs somewhere in the universe.
  • Dangerous Minds looks at the psychedelic retro-futurism of Swedish artist Kilian Eng.
  • Dead Things notes the recovery of ancient human DNA from some African sites, and what this could mean for study.
  • Cody Delistraty reconsiders the idea of the “coming of age” narrative. Does this make sense now that we have abandoned the idea of a unitary self?
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to a paper examining the evolution of icy bodies around different post-main sequence stars.
  • The Great Grey Bridge’s Philip Turner notes anti-Putin dissident Alexei Navalny.
  • Hornet Stories notes reports of anti-gay persecution in Azerbaijan.
  • Language Log takes a look at the dialectal variations of southern Ohio.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money starts a discussion about what effective disaster relief for Puerto Rico would look like.
  • The LRB Blog looks at the aftermath of the recent earthquake in Mexico, and the story of the buried girl who was not there.
  • Marginal Revolution notes that Toronto real estate companies, in light of rent control, are switching rental units over to condos.
  • Naked Anthropologist Laura Agustín takes a look at the origins and stories of migrant sex workers.
  • The NYR Daily talks about the supposedly unthinkable idea of nuclear war in the age of Trump.
  • Drew Rowsome gives a strongly positive–and deserved review to the Minmar Gaslight show The Seat Next to the King, a Fringe triumph now playing at the Theatre Centre.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel explains how so many outer-system icy worlds have liquid water.
  • Towleroad features Jim Parsons’ exploration of how important is for him, as a gay man, to be married.
  • Window on Eurasia suggests Russian language policy limiting minority languages in education could backfire, and wonders if Islamization one way people in an urbanizing North Caucasus are trying to remain connected to community.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

  • Centauri Dreams shares, from JPL, the schedule for Cassini in its last days of existence. Goodbye, dear probe.
  • Dangerous Minds shares some classic illustrations from a Persian book called Lights of Canopus.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to a paper suggesting that gas giants can stabilize debris disks.
  • Far Outliers shares excerpts from the diary of a Japanese soldier fighting in New Guinea in the Second World War.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes the real suffering that high rents impose on the poor in American cities.
  • The Map Room Blog shares some nice X-ray maps of New York City subway stations.
  • The Planetary Society Blog shares more vintage Voyager photos of the outer solar system: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune …
  • Roads and Kingdoms tells of the marvelous cookies made on the dying Venetian island of Burano.
  • Drew Rowsome considers, at length and with personal references, the differences between “art” and “porn”. NSFW.
  • Understanding Society considers the latest thinking on causal mechanisms in modern sociology.
  • Window on Eurasia wonders if non-Russian languages in Russia are attacked out of anxiety over Russian’s own decline, and speculates that if integration of mostly Muslim immigrants goes poorly in Moscow, the city could get locked in sectarian conflict.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes how data mining of stellar surveys led to the discovery of a new star type, the BLAP.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly tells about her enjoyable recent stay at Fire Island.
  • Centauri Dreams notes the latest maneuvers of asteroid probe OSIRIS-REx.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to a paper considering oxygen in exoplanet atmospheres as a biomarker.
  • Joe. My. God. notes how racist Arizona sheriff Joe Arpaio is upset at being called a racist.
  • Language Log notes how China censored images of the Tibetan-language tattoo of MMA fighter Dan Hardy.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes how deportees to Mexico are beset by that country’s crime syndicates.
  • Marginal Revolution links to a paper considering how many sellers a market needs to be competitive.
  • The New APPS Blog considers the racism of Donald Trump in the light of Agamben’s concept of the homo sacer.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw considers the issue of monuments in Australia in the context of Aborigines’ sufferings by the subjects memorialized.
  • The Planetary Society Blog shows the Jupiter approach videos taken by the Voyager probes.
  • Towleroad explains why Diana, with her embrace of (among other things) fashion and AIDS victims, is a gay icon.
  • Arnold Zwicky notes the official registration in Scotland of a tartan for LGBT people.

[NEWS] Four science links warming Maritime waters, BC forests, gravitational lens, Voyager data

  • The waters off the Maritimes, it seems, have enjoyed unusually warm temperatures this year. The Globe and Mail reports.
  • What will become of the forest of British Columbia if locals do not protect it from over-logging? National Observer considers.
  • What, exactly, is this mysteriously invisible high-mass body acting as a gravitational lens in intergalactic space? VICE describes the mystery.
  • The Planetary Society Blog, in commemoration of the Voyagers, shares its archived materials on the probes’ discoveries, right here.

[NEWS] Four links on life in the solar system, past and present

  • When the sun becomes a red giant, Europa and Enceladus will become superheated greenhouses without Earth-like phases.
  • A new model of early Venus suggests it could have had oceans and Earthly temperatures less than a billion years ago.
  • Past activity around the volcanoes of Mars means that these areas could have been refuges for life.
  • On the discovery of acrylonitrile on Titan, a membrane-forming chemical that could permit life in the super-cold.

Written by Randy McDonald

August 4, 2017 at 2:30 pm

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly writes about the pleasures of the unmediated life, experienced in her recent vacation.
  • This celebration at Centauri Dreams of the forty years of science from the Voyager missions is heart-warming.
  • White racism in power is touched upon at Lawyers, Guns and Money.
  • Noel Maurer notes that the Philippines, where indiscriminate violence is state policy, no longer counts as a true democracy. Duturte as Marcos?
  • The Russian Demographics Blog shares a map depicting the frequency with which young adults live with parents across Europe. Northwestern Europe stands out.
  • Understanding Society looks at an early critique of positivism in sociology.
  • Window on Eurasia looks at Belarus’ preparation for the Zapad 2017 military exercises with Russia.