A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘kenya

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • Bad Astronomer notes the latest news on interstellar comet 2/Borisov.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly emphasizes how every writer does need an editor.
  • Centauri Dreams notes how the gas giant GJ 3512 b, half the mass of Jupiter orbiting a red dwarf star closely, is an oddly massive exoplanet.
  • Gina Schouten at Crooked Timber looks at inter-generational clashes on parenting styles.
  • D-Brief looks at the methods of agriculture that could conceivably sustain a populous human colony on Mars.
  • Bruce Dorminey argues that we on Earth need something like Starfleet Academy, to help us advance into space.
  • Colby King at the Everyday Sociology Blog looks at how the socio-spatial perspective helps us understand the development of cities.
  • Russell Arben Fox at In Media Res listens to the Paul McCartney album Flaming Pie.
  • io9 looks at Proxima, a contemporary spaceflight film starring Eva Green.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at how the intense relationship between the US and Saudi Arabia began in, and reflected, the era of Jim Crow.
  • Language Hat notes a report suggesting that multilingualism helps ward off dementia.
  • Language Log takes issue with the names of the mascots of the 2022 Beijing Winter Olympics.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes the emergence of a ninth woman complaining about being harassed by Al Franken.
  • Marginal Revolution links to a new paper arguing that the Washington Consensus worked.
  • The NYR Daily shares an Aubrey Nolan cartoon illustrating the evacuation of war children in the United Kingdom during the Second World War.
  • At Out of Ambit, Diane Duane shares a nice collection of links for digital mapmakers.
  • The Planetary Society Blog looks at how the European Space Agency supports the cause of planetary defense.
  • Roads and Kingdoms interviews Kenyan writer Kevin Mwachiro at length.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel reports on how a mysterious fast radio burst helped illuminate an equally mysterious galactic halo.
  • Strange Company reports on the mysterious and unsolved death in 1936 of Canadian student Thomas Moss in an Oxfordshire hayrick.
  • Frank Jacobs at Strange Maps notes how Mount Etna is a surpassingly rare decipoint.
  • Understanding Society considers the thought of Kojève, after Hegel, on freedom.
  • Window on Eurasia looks at the falling numbers of Russians, and of state support for Russian language and culture, in independent Central Asia.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell looks at how individual consumer responses are much less effective than concerted collective action in triggering change.
  • Arnold Zwicky reports on some transgender fashion models.

[URBAN NOTE] Five city links: Brooklyn and Queens, Calgary, El Paso, Sheffield, Nairobi

  • Curbed looks at what is happening with the proposed new streetcar route connecting Brooklyn and Queens.
  • Urban farm Grow Calgary has found a new home in the southeast of that city. Global News reports.
  • The claim of Donald Trump that Texas border city El Paso was a criminalized disaster spinning out of control is, of course, provably wrong. VICE has it.
  • This Guardian feature shares the responses of readers to an article looking at the decline of the high street of the English city of Sheffield.
  • CityLab looks</u at the impact of terrorism on Nairobi, at the growing presence of elements of security theatre on the street and at the targeting of ethnic Somalis in Eastleigh.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • In a long and frighteningly compelling article, Charlie Stross at Autopope warns that a Britain that heads for a hard Brexit might be lucky only to go through the worst of the 1970s.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait explores the fact that an asteroid the size of a car burned up in the atmosphere above Greenland on the 25th of July, 2018.
  • Centauri Dreams shares an essay by Ramses Ramirez looking at efforts to redefine the classical “habitable zone” in more useful ways, keeping different planetary and stellar environments in mind.
  • Crooked Timber’s John Quiggin takes a look at the failures of a journalism relying on anonymous interview given the prospects of a hard Brexit.
  • The Crux considers how the decision of flight-controllers to direct Voyager 1 towards a close flyby of Titan closed off the possibility of that spacecraft visiting Pluto in 1986.
  • D-Brief looks at the exchange of microbes among subway passengers.
  • JSTOR Daily takes a look at just how codified societies of the pirates of the early modern North Atlantic could be, of necessity.
  • Language Log takes a look at why Matti, a character from the Finnish Nightmares webcomic, has become so massively popular in China.
  • At Lawyers, Guns and Money, Dan Nexon continues his analysis of American hegemony, looking at instances of past hegemonies undermined not by foreign opposition but by non-state actors and by domestic opponents.
  • Neuroskeptic notes a study suggesting the data sets collected by psychologists are actually not broadly accessible at all.
  • Francis Wade a href=”https://www.nybooks.com/daily/2018/08/06/ngugi-wa-thiongo-and-the-tyranny-of-language/”&gt;writes for the NYR Daily about Ngũgĩ wa Thiong’o, a Kenyan writer whose work–first writing in English, then shifting to Gikuyu–reflects a deep awareness of the intimate links between language and colonization, even in a post-colonial world.
  • Corey S. Powell at Out There asks an important question: What is a habitable planet? Can we even speculate given how little we know?
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel looks at the prospect of sending orbiters like Galileo and Cassini, to Uranus and Neptune. The technology is there, the ODINUS mission has been sketched out, and there is a tempting launch window in 2034.
  • Towleroad shares an excerpt from Omarosa Manigault’s new book on Donald Trump and his administration, talking about the cognitive decline she witnessed.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that Russia is strengthening its Interior Ministry forces opposing the Donbas republics in eastern Ukraine, ostensibly to prevent smuggling.
  • Arnold Zwicky takes a look at some homoerotic art from Brazil with an accompanying Marilyn Frye text confusingly translated to Portuguese and back again.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

  • At Anthro{dendum}, Daniel Miller writes about how some of the food he cooks evokes his history in Cuba-influenced Tampa.
  • Bad Astronomer notes an astonishingly high-resolution image of protoplanet Vesta taken from the Earth.
  • The Big Picture shares photos of the Kakuma refugee camp, in Kenya.
  • Centauri Dreams notes one proposal to help extend the life of a Type III civilization in the Milky Way Galaxy by importing stars from outside of the local group.
  • Crooked Timber’s Corey Robin talks about changing minds in politics, inspired by the success of Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez.
  • Dangerous Minds shares the 1978 BBC documentary on surrealism, Europe After the Rain.
  • Far Outliers shares the third part of a summary of an article on African and Japanese mercenaries in Asia.
  • Hornet Stories reports on the regret of Buffy showrunner Martin Noxon that her show killed off Tara. (I agree: I liked her.)
  • At In Medias Res, Russell Arben Fox wonders what American farmers–by extension, perhaps, other farmers in other high-income societies–want. With their entire culture being undermine, what can they hope for?
  • Joe. My. God. notes how far-right groups in Europe are increasingly welcoming lesbian, gay, and bisexual members. (Not so much trans people, it seems.)
  • JSTOR Daily reports on the obvious utility of the humble beaver (in its North American homelands, at least).
  • Language Log considers the politics of the national language policy of China.
  • This Language Hat articlereporting on a conference on xenolinguistics, and the discussion in the comments, is fascinating. What can we hope to learn about non-human language? What will it have, and have not, in common?
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer considers the slow corruption of independent institutions in Mexico that may occur under the presidency of AMLO.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes that, while we have not found life on Enceladus, we have found indicators of a world that could support life.
  • Window on Eurasia wonders if Russia is increasingly at risk of being displaced in Central Asia by a dynamic Kazakhstan.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • Anthropology.net’s Kambiz Kamrani notes evidence that environmental change in Kenya may have driven creativity in early human populations there.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait shows how astronomers use stellar occultations to investigate the thin atmosphere of Neptune’s moon Triton.
  • Centauri Dreams notes how melting ice creates landscape change on Ceres.
  • D-Brief suggests that supervolcanoes do not pose such a huge risk to the survival of humanity, in the past or the future, as we thoughts.
  • Dangerous Minds shares Paul Bowles’ recipe for a Moroccan love charm.
  • The Everyday Sociology Blog investigates the transformation of shopping malls and in the era of Amazon Prime.
  • At In Medias Res, Russell Arben Fox engages with Left Behind and that book’s portrayal of rural populations in the United States which feel left behind.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at how Roman Catholic nuns on the 19th century American frontier challenged gender norms.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money is critical of Tex-Mex cuisine, calling it an uncreative re-presentation of Mexican cuisine for white people in high-calorie quantities.
  • The NYR Daily shared this thought-provoking article noting how Irish America, because of falling immigration from Ireland and growing liberalism on that island, is diverging from its ancestral homeland.
  • Drew Rowsome reviews The Monument, a powerful play currently on in Toronto that engages with the missing and murdered native women.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes, in a photo-heavy post, how galaxies die (or at least, how they stop forming stars).
  • Towleroad shares a delightful interview with Adam Rippon conducted over a plate of hot wings.
  • Window on Eurasia shares an alternate history article imagining what would have become of Russia had Muscovy not conquered Novgorod.
  • Worthwhile Canadian Initiative notes the very sharp rise in public debt held by the province of Ontario, something that accelerated in recent years.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell suggests, in the era of Cambridge Analytica and fake news, that many journalists seem not to take their profession seriously enough.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

  • Anthropology.net notes evidence that injured Neanderthals were cared for by their kin.
  • James Bow shares a photo of Ottawa at night and considers the growing city with its greenbelt.
  • Centauri Dreams reacts to the immense discoveries surrounding GW170817.
  • Crooked Timber considers the vexed nature of the phrase “Judeo-Christian.”
  • Bruce Dorminey notes an American government study suggesting a North Korean EMP attack could cause collapse.
  • Hornet Stories reports that Russian pop singer Zelimkhan Bakaev has been murdered in Chechnya as part of the anti-gay purges.
  • Language Hat looks at lunfardo, the Italian-inflicted argot of Buenos Aires.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes that, with Trump undermining the US, the prospects of China’s rise to define the new world order are looking good.
  • The NYR Daily looks at reports of significant electoral fraud in Kenya.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw looks at the continuing Australian reaction to China’s Belt and Road project.
  • Roads and Kingdoms reports from Sichuan’s peppercorn fields at harvest time.
  • Drew Rowsome responds to Andrew Pyper’s new novel, The Only Child.
  • Strange Company looks at the mysterious 1900 woman of New Yorker Kathryn Scharn.
  • Strange Maps looks at an ingenious, if flawed, map of the Berlin metro dating from the 1920s.
  • Peter Watts considers the question of individual identity over time. What changes, what stays the same?
  • Window on Eurasia notes that a shift from their native languages to Russian will not end minority ethnic identities.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

  • Dangerous Minds notes a remarkable Japanese magazine featuring photos of rock stars from the 1970s and 1980s.
  • Joe. My. God. notes the death of drag legend Lady Chablis.
  • Marginal Revolution notes the exceptional skepticism of some with the idea of a guaranteed minimum income in Kenya.
  • The NYRB Daily interviews Chinese documentary filmmaker Ai Xiaoming, who despairs for the future of civil society in her country.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer contrasts race and politics in the states of Alabama and Mississippi.
  • Registan notes the orderly succession of power in post-Karimov Uzbekistan.
  • Torontoist notes that the TTC can be a nightmare for women.