A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘kyrgyzstan

[BLOG] Some Monday links

  • Architectuul looks at the winners of an architecture prize based in Piran, here.
  • Bad Astronomy’s Phil Plait notes the wind emitted from one distant galaxy’s supermassive black hole is intense enough to trigger star formation in other galaxies.
  • Maria Farrell at Crooked Timber pays tribute to Jack Merritt, a young victim of the London Bridge attack who was committed to the cause of prisoner rehabilitation.
  • Dangerous Minds looks at the history of French pop group Les Rita Mitsouko.
  • Bruce Dorminey reports on the European Space Agency’s belief Earth-observing spacecraft are needed to track ocean acidification.
  • The Dragon’s Tales reports on the consensus of the Russian scientific community against human genetic engineering.
  • Far Outliers reports on the first ambassador sent from the Barbary States to the United States.
  • JSTOR Daily reports on the life of pioneering anthropologist Franz Boas.
  • Language Log shares images of a bottle of Tibetan water, bought in Hong Kong, labeled in Tibetan script.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money rightly assigns responsibility for the terrible measles outbreak in Samoa to anti-vaxxers.
  • The LRB Blog notes how tree planting is not apolitical, might even not be a good thing to do sometimes.
  • Marginal Revolution reports on a paper suggesting that food tends to be better in restaurants located on streets in Manhattan, better than in restaurants located on avenues.
  • Justin Petrone at north! shares an account of a trip across Estonia.
  • The NYR Daily looks at the photography of Michael Jang.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw continues to report from Armidale, in Australia, shrouded in smoke from wildfires.
  • The Planetary Society Blog reports on the early days of the Planetary Society, four decades ago.
  • The Russian Demographics Blog looks at how centenarians in Sweden and in Denmark experience different trends in longevity.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel reports on the accidental discovery of the microwave background left by the Big Bang in 1964.
  • Understanding Society’s Daniel Little looks at the increasingly poor treatment of workers by employers such as Amazon through the lens of primitive accumulation.
  • Window on Eurasia looks at the small differences separating the Kazakhs from the Kyrgyz.
  • Arnold Zwicky shares a dance routine, shown on television in France, against homophobia.

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait, looking at the Moon, considers what a “small” crater is.
  • Citizen Science Salon looks at Amino Labs, a start-up that aims to enable people–even children–to use simple kits to engage in bioengineering.
  • Crooked Timber notes that the collapse in Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies means good things for the global environment.
  • The Crux considers the extent to which gender–gender identity, gendered roles–is unique to humans.
  • A Fistful of Euros considers the generalized extremism of the “filets jaunes” of France and where this might lead that country.
  • L.M. Sacasas at The Frailest Thing shares the skepticism of Jacques Ellul in a “technical” humanism, one that seeks to ameliorate the details of a dehumanizing life.
  • Gizmodo considers how we can start preparing for the risks of powerful artificial intelligence to humans, even potentially existential ones.
  • The Island Review interviews Nancy Campbell, a writer concerned with the islands and cultures of the Arctic like Greenland.
  • Language Hat considers the idea of “efficient languages”. What does this idea even mean?
  • Language Log considers the potential impact of making English an official language on Taiwan.
  • The LRB Blog considers the political future of France.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how many people in Kyrgzystan are becoming angered by China’s Xinjiang policies.
  • Arnold Zwicky considers St. Bernard, in connection with dogs and otherwise.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

  • The Buzz celebrates Esi Edugyan’s winning of the Giller Prize for the second time, for her amazing novel Washington Black.
  • Centauri Dreams notes the unusual rings of outer-system body Chariklo.
  • The Crux looks at the long history of unsuccessful planet-hunting at Barnard’s Star, concentrating on the disproved mid-20th century work of Peter Van De Kamp.
  • D-Brief notes evidence that Mars knew catastrophic floods that radically reshaped its surface.
  • Bruce Dorminey visits and explores Korea’s ancient Cheomseongdae Observatory.
  • The Everyday Sociology Blog notes the death of long-time contributor Peter Kaufman.
  • L.M. Sacasas at The Frailest Thing considers the things–quiet, even–that modernity can undermine before transforming into a commodity.
  • Imageo notes that global warming has continued this American Thanksgiving.
  • Joe. My. God. notes the sour grapes of the Family Research Council at the success of the moving film about “gay conversion therapy”, Boy Erased.
  • JSTOR Daily links to a paper considering if the zeitgeist of the world is into major monuments.
  • Language Log considers a news report of “arsehole” geese in Australia. As a Canadian, all I can say is that geese are birds that know they are dinosaurs.
  • The LRB Blog reports from the scene of the recent unrecognized elections in the city of Donetsk, run by a pro-Russian regime.
  • The Map Room Blog reports on how Atlas Obscura is exhibiting some amazing maps produced in Dungeons and Dragons campaigns.
  • Marginal Revolution links to a paper noting how black teachers can help boost achievements among black students.
  • The New APPS Blog looks at how the political economy of our time combines with social media to atomize and fragment society.
  • Nicholas Lezard at the NYR Daily talks about his experience of anti-Semitism, as a non-Jew, in the United Kingdom.
  • Casey Dreier at the Planetary Society Blog suggests families would do better to talk about space at Thanksgiving than about politics, and shares a list of subjects.
  • Drew Rowsome talks about the frustrations and the entertainment involved with Bohemian Rhapsody.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that fifty thousand ethnic Kyrgyz are being held in the Xinjiang camps of China.
  • Arnold Zwicky shares some Thanksgiving holiday cartoons by Roz Chast.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

  • The Crux compares the Dead Sea Scrolls, and the stories that they hold, to the sorts of oral histories that historians have traditionally been skeptical of. What, after all, is the difference?
  • D-Brief notes a proposal by scientists to reengineer the world’s food system to support a larger population in a time of environmental stresses.
  • Earther notes that Gallifrey, the homeworld of Doctor Who, would be a pretty uninviting Earth-like world.
  • Peter Kaufman at the Everyday Sociology Blog writes a powerful sociological treatment of his impending death.
  • Far Outliers considers the relative firepower of the Hatfields and the McCoys.
  • JSTOR Daily links to a paper considering how, and why, different epidemics can be suitable (or not) for entertainment purposes.
  • Language Hat looks at a remarkable new book, Robert Macfarlane’s Lost Words, drawing from the nature-related words dropped by the Oxford Junior Dictionary.
  • Lingua Franca at the Chronicle notes how “du coup” has ascended to become a newly prominent expression in French.
  • Marginal Revolution links to a paper examining mechanisms explaining how Communism had a lasting negative effect towards immigration.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that Tajikistan and Kyrgyzstan, poor and insecure, need Russian military bases in their countries more than Russia does.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

    The Buzz at the Toronto Public Library bids farewell to V.S. Naipaul.

  • Centauri Dreams takes a look at ultra-hot Jupiters, gas giants orbiting close enough to their star that water in their atmosphere breaks down and rubies rain down from their skies.
  • The Crux explores the pathways among neurons that transform experiences into memories.
  • D-Brief notes that, according to a study of mice, the more fit a person is the better they will shiver.
  • Karen Sternheimer at the Everyday Sociology Blog notes how the shift to a cashless economy leaves people who don’t have access to good-quality financial services marginalized. How can they function if they lack access to a bank account?
  • The Finger Post praises Tokyo’s Narita airport, among other things for offering excellent Japanese food.
  • Russell Arben Fox at In Media Res considers the evolution of the Mormons of the American West as a distinctive voting bloc.
  • Lucy Ferris at Lingua Franca talks about language learning, in the light of an American state governor’s campaign against French language instruction, as something that can open up new possibilities and perspectives.
  • Bill McKibben at the NYR Daily argues that the best political response of Americans to Trumpism and its environmental outrages is to vote Democratic in the upcoming midterms.
  • The Planetary Society Blog’s Emily Lakdawalla notes the postponement of the launch of the Indian Chandrayaan-2 Moon probe to the start of January 2019, for technical reasons with the probe and its launcher.
  • Drew Rowsome notes the homophobic censorship by Facebook of non-explicit LGBTQ content like his.
  • Peter Rukavina flowcharts the evolution of different Charlottetown coffeeshops, by location and by owners, over the past few years.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes evidence that the first stars in the early universe formed around 250 million years after the Big Bang.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that Kyrgyzstan and Uzbekistan have just engaged in a swap of territories, the better to create a coherent frontier between the two neighbours.

[URBAN NOTE] Five city links: Vaughan and Markham, Hamilton, Los Angeles, Hong Kong, Bishkek

  • Noor Javed notes that, if belatedly, people actually have signed up to run as mayor in Markham in Vaughan. The Toronto Star has it.
  • Hamilton Mayor Fred Eisenberger strongly disagrees with Doug Ford’s reduction of the size of Toronto City Council, hoping this does not speak to a future deterioration of province-municipal relations generally. Global News reports.
  • CityLab notes that a Los Angeles subsidy to urban farmers has gone almost entirely unused.
  • Noise complaints, CityLab reports, have led to the closure of the pedestrian mall in Hong Kong’s Mong Kok neighbourhood.
  • Open Democracy reports on what sounds like an almost literally criminally planned program of chopping down much-needed urban tree coverage in the Kyrgyzstan capital of Bishkek.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes a team of students who caught footage of the August solar eclipse from a high-altitude balloon.
  • D-Brief notes the discovery that the early Moon apparently had a very thin atmosphere for tens of millions of years.
  • The Dragon’s Tales links to Elon Musk’s descriptions of his space ambitions.
  • Hornet Stories notes that many on the alt-right are upset that game Wolfenstein is all about shooting Nazis.
  • The LRB Blog notes the almost ridiculous irony of Conservative Theresa May wearing a bracelet with the image of radical leftist Frida Kahlo.
  • Russell Darnley looks at efforts to get Singapore restaurants to shift away from using environmentally damaging palm oil.
  • The NYR Daily looks at the overwhelming power of the NRA in the modern United States.
  • The Planetary Society Blog considers ways we can do SETI better by having a less Eurocentric understanding of our own history.
  • Window on Eurasia wonders if Uzbekistan and Kyrgzystan could solve border issues through swapping enclaves.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell looks at the corrosive effect of Bannon, and journalistic culture generally, on politics.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait shares stunning photos of Jupiter and its moons taken from the Earth.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly talks about the life lessons she has taken from her recent extended trip in Europe.
  • Centauri Dreams notes the testing, by a European team, of the InflateSail intended to remove debris from Earth orbit.
  • Crooked Timber takes a look at the historically messy interactions between democratic governance and economic policy.
  • Dangerous Minds notes that Trump is making use of LGBT people as pawns. I wish the conclusion was less frighteningly convincing.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to a paper on a recent search for exomoons, including the possible detection of Kepler 1625b I.
  • The Frailest Thing’s Michael Sacasas considers what it means for a parent to look at their child in an era of technologically mediated vision.
  • In Medias Res’ Russell Arben Fox notes, from his personal experience, how Donald Trump just does not get scouting.
  • Language Log shares a report of how a Chinese man with synesthesia sees written language.
  • The LRB Blog notes how Isaiah Berlin predicted the Saudi-American alliance back in 1945.
  • Marginal Revolution notes a recent decline in regional income convergence in the United States. Causes?
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer notes the politics that went into costly subway design changes in Mexico City. (Line 12 does look nice.)
  • Strange Company notes the romance of the grave of the Mysterious Stranger in Alexandria, Virginia. Who was she?
  • Unicorn Booty notes that Jinks Monsoon will be voicing a Steven Universe character and is out as non-gendered.
  • Window on Eurasia notes growing controversy in Kyrgyzstan over a switch in Kyrgyz alphabets from Cyrillic to Latin.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

  • Centauri Dreams looks at the complex prebiotic chemistry in the system of young triple IRAS 16293-2422.
  • Language Hat looks at the central role played by Kyrgzystan writer Chinghiz Aitmatov in shaping Kyrgyz identity.
  • The Map Room Blog shares Baltimore’s new transit map.
  • Steve Munro examines the Ford family’s various issues with TTC streetcars.
  • The Russian Demographics Blog reports on the latest UN report on the Donbas and the conflict there.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that the number of ethnic Russians in the former Soviet Union has fallen sharply through demographic change including assimilation.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly calls on journalists to stand up to Trump.
  • Centauri Dreams looks at exocomets.
  • Language Log shares an ad from the 1920s using the most vintage language imaginable.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money talks about globalization as a mechanism for concentrating wealth at the top of the elite.
  • The LRB Blog talks about the ghosts of the Cold War in the contemporary world.
  • Marginal Revolution’s Tyler Cowen argues that Germany has its own responsibility in transatlantic relations.
  • The New APPS Blog looks at the importance of administrative law.
  • The NYRB Daily celebrates John Berger.
  • Savage Minds proposes a read-in of Michel Foucault in protest of Trump’s inauguration on the 20th.
  • Towleroad reports on the latest statistics on the proportions of LGBT people in the United States.
  • Window on Eurasia looks at the continuing depopulation of the Russian Far East and examines the shift to indigenous naming practices in Kyrgyzstan.