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Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘lake erie

[NEWS] Fourteen links

  • By at least one metric, New Brunswick now lags economically behind a more dynamic Prince Edward Island. CBC reports.
  • NOW Toronto looks at toxic fandoms. (“Stanning” sounds really creepy to me.)
  • This CityLab article looks at how the particular characteristics of Japan, including its high population density, helps keep alive there retail chains that have failed in the US.
  • MacLean’s looks at Kent Monkman, enjoying a new level of success with his diptych Mistikôsiwak at the Met in NYC.
  • Can there be something that can be said for the idea of an Internet more strongly pillarized? Wired argues.
  • I reject utterly the idea of meaningful similarities between Drake and Leonard Cohen. CBC did it.
  • Toronto Life looks at the life of a Hamilton woman hurt badly by the cancellation of the basic income pilot, here.
  • Inspired by the death of Gord Downie, Ontario now has the office of poet-laureate. CBC reports.
  • Is Canada at risk, like Ireland, of experiencing two-tier health care? CBC considers.
  • A French immigrant couple has brought the art of artisanal vinegar to ile d’Orléans. CBC reports.
  • Shore erosion is complicating the lives of people along Lake Erie. CBC reports.
  • MacLean’s notes how Via Rail making it difficult for people without credit cards to buy anything on their trains, hurting many.
  • Michelle Legro notes at Gen that the 2010s is the decade where conspiracy culture became mainstream.
  • This essay by Robert Greene at his blog talking about what history, and historians, can do in our era is thought-provoking.

[NEWS] Four science lnks: Lake Erie, Great Lakes Water Walk, robotic agriculture, carbon on Earth

  • Lake Erie, National Geographic notes, is experiencing regular massive algae blooms.
  • Adria Vasil talks about her experience taking part in the recent Great Lakes Water Walk, over at NOW Toronto.
  • Atlas Obscura has more about that drone-harvested field of barley in England.
  • The early Earth got much less carbon than it might have been expected to from the early solar system. Universe Today reports.

Written by Randy McDonald

October 5, 2017 at 10:30 pm

[LINK] “Lake Erie’s algae blooms threaten its survival”

News that Lake Erie, southernmost of the Great Lakes and one upstream from Lake Ontario, is facing environmental catastrophe again as phosphorous runoff feeds algae blooms, featured prominently in this evening’s news. See the observation by CBC’s Margo McDiarmid.

Lake Erie, once a success story about how a polluted lake can be brought back to life, is once again struggling to survive.

During the summer months, the most southern of the five Great Lakes is smothering under huge blooms of green algae, often thousands of square kilometres in size.

A new report to be released by the International Joint Commission (IJC) this Thursday recommends some immediate steps to save the lake.

The acting Canadian chair of the IJC, Gordon Walker, told the House of Commons environment committee that Lake Erie is in a crisis.

[. . .]

Phosphorus was a problem that many people thought had been solved in the mid-60’s.

Canadian researchers discovered that phosphorus in laundry detergent was turning lakes green with algae.

The phosphorous feeds the algae, which absorb the oxygen in the lakes and create dead zones.

In 1972, the U.S. and Canada signed the Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement, which committed them to take action.

That included banning phosphates from all laundry detergent. Within 10 years the levels of phosphorus had dropped and the lakes were on the mend.

But in 2011, a 5,000-square-kilometre algal bloom in Lake Erie was a sign of more trouble. It prompted the IJC to launch a study into the problem.

The report concludes that phosphorus is getting back into Lake Erie from agricultural fertilizers used in growing corn for ethanol and other crops. Domestic lawn fertilizers are also a source of the phosphorus, said Walker.

“Every home wants to have it on their front lawn, he said. “It all runs into the river and it’s untreated and that becomes a problem.”

The report says rivers in Indiana and Ohio that flow into Lake Erie are the largest sources of phosphorus, but some of it also comes from Ontario’s Grand and Thames rivers.

Written by Randy McDonald

February 28, 2014 at 1:35 am