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Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘latin america

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

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  • Anthropology.net reports on the recent discovery in China of two skulls a hundred thousand years old, possible remnants of a hitherto-unknown hominid species.
  • blogTO reports on the boom in the Toronto tech community.
  • Language Log breaks down the linguistics, specifically word lengths, of audiobooks.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money reports on the difficult position of indigenous peoples in Nicaragua.
  • Marginal Revolution reports on the potential health benefits of substances in the blood of the Komodo dragon.
  • The NYRB Daily reports on the modernist photography of Berenice Abbott.
  • The Planetary Society Blog reports on the adventures of the Mars rovers.
  • Supernova Condensate takes a quick look at Jupiter’s moon, Io.
  • Window on Eurasia looks at a new Russian film that transposes the superhero genre with the Soviet era, and argues that Russia is acting these days not as a constructive power but as a spoiler.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

  • blogTO reports on how a trespasser at track level disrupted subway service today.
  • Crooked Timber argues Trump’s migration ban is best under stood as an elaboration of existing Western immigration policies, taking them to their logical conclusion.
  • Dangerous Minds looks at 1980s New York City industrial rockers Missing Foundation.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze examines the orbit of Proxima Centauri around the A-B pair.
  • The Everyday Sociology Blog profiles four millennial students to attack the idea of their generation as lazy.
  • Language Log and Strange Maps look at how the list of countries whose citizens are banned from the US does not map onto the list of countries which have provided terrorists who have attacked the United States.
  • The LRB BLog looks at the first ten days of the Trump Administration.
  • The NYRB Daily looks at the scale of the popular mobilization against Trump.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer looks at how modest immigration controls in Argentina are overshadowed by the US.
  • Transit Toronto reports on streetcar line repair on Queen Street.
  • Window on Eurasia wonders if Trump will allow Russia to do as it will in most of the former Soviet Union, and looks at the prospect Russia might lose out in international sporting events.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

  • blogTO notes that Uniqlo will be giving away free thermal clothing tomorrow.
  • James Bow shares his column about the importance of truth.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly shares with us her mid-winter walk.
  • Centauri Dreams reports about cometary water.
  • Dangerous Minds shares German cinema lobby cards from the 1960s.
  • Language Hat talks about dropping apostrophes.
  • Language Log reports about lexical searches on Google.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money reports on the latest from Trump.
  • The NYRB Daily shares a review of an Iranian film on gender relations.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer notes the ongoing gas price protests in Mexico.
  • Spacing links to some articles about affordable housing around the world.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy notes Germany’s abolition of a law forbidding insults to foreign heads of state.
  • Window on Eurasia suggests that stable Russian population figures cover up a wholesale collapse in the numbers of ethnic Russians, and looks at the shortages of skilled workers faced by defense industries.

[AH] What would the post-war settlement of the Falklands with an Argentine victory be like?

The other day, I came across an article by Samuel Osborne in the Independent, “CIA had secret plan to give Falkland Islands to Argentina and relocate islanders to Scotland.” In it, Osborne describes American thinking on a settlement of the Falklands War assuming–as was entirely possible–an Argentine victory.

“For a period of three years the inhabitants of the Falkland Islands will be given a chance to consider whether they wish to remain on the Falkland Islands or whether they wish to relocate to an area of British jurisdiction, either in the UK or elsewhere under British sovereignty, with a relocation grant of $100,000 per person,” Mr Rowen wrote.

“It is likely that many residents will find this sufficient inducement to relocate to some other area, perhaps in Scotland or elsewhere where conditions may be similar to the Falkland Islands.”

He adds: “Any residents who do not wish to relocate will be free to remain and become Argentinian citizens at the end of three years.

“The cost of the relocation grants to be paid to any residents of the Falkland Islands wishing to relocate elsewhere will be borne fifty/fifty by the Argentinian and British governments.”

The plans were addressed to Paul Wolfowitz, a Department of State advisor to President Ronald Reagan.

They also called for “some appropriate penalty upon the Argentinians for having used armed force to seek to settle an international dispute.”

This sort of intermediate phase of British rule under Argentine sovereignty, followed by a complete reversion to Argentine sovereignty, seems like a plausible outcome assuming that the United Kingdom had decisively lost the contest to control the islands. Is it? What price would Argentina be forced to pay for its conquest of the Falklands? And how would this–the acquisition of the islands, also the cost of their acquisition imposed by the United States–complicate the democratic transition in Argentina of our timeline in the 1980s?

Written by Randy McDonald

January 25, 2017 at 11:14 pm

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

  • Bad Astronomy’s Phil Plait shares a video showing how tacos are made in space.
  • blogTO shares some classic photos of the TTC in the 1960s and 1970s.
  • The Crux goes into more detail about the mesentery.
  • D-Brief notes how the binary star KIC 9832227 is projected to experience a stellar merger in 2022.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to one paper suggesting that exoplanets and brown dwarfs are as common around A and F stars as around dimmer Sun-like stars, and links to another paper examining the potential of detecting transits of exoplanets orbiting brown dwarfs.
  • The Dragon’s Tales links to an article wondering if China’s seizure of a US navy drone could set a precedent for satellite seizures.
  • Language Log links to Yiyun Lee’s article about abandoning Chinese for English.
  • The LRB Blog remembers philosopher Derek Parfit.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer looks at the recent riots in Mexico, caused by rising gas prices.
  • Strange Maps shares informative maps exploring the Netherlands’ internal distinctions.
  • Window on Eurasia looks at how the Russian language has multiple standards despite Russian official claims, and shares complaints about Kaliningrad’s vulnerability.

[LINK] CBC News’ Don Pittis on Mexico as an emergent First World economy

CNC News’ Don Pittis has a good article, written from a Canadian perspective, arguing that the likelihood of Mexico’s emergence as a First World economy means that we should shed old stereotypes. Among other things, there’s the potential for substantial profit.

Handicraft markets on beach vacations may perpetuate a cartoon image of the country, but a visit to Mexico’s vibrant and sparkling capital city, undergoing a long-term building boom, offers a very different view.

A new report by the Conference Board of Canada commissioned by HSBC makes the case that Mexico and Canada may be ideal trade and investment partners.

The report sees clear signs that Mexico is on the verge of an economic transition that will only benefit Canadian companies that get involved.

Despite Trump’s claims, the number of Mexicans running from poverty to the United States has dwindled. While Spanish speakers continue to cross Mexico to enter the United States from other Latin American countries, an increasing number of Mexicans are finding good work at home.

In December, news that Mexico had displaced Canada as America’s second biggest trading partner got lots of attention in Mexico.

But the reason U.S. companies want to locate there is that the country has become a global manufacturing hub, having free trade deals with more countries than anywhere else.

Written by Randy McDonald

January 5, 2017 at 6:00 pm

[LINK] “Agroecology Booming in Argentina”

The Inter Press Service’s Fabiana Frayssinet reports on the popularity in Argentina of agroecology, a variant on organic agriculture.

Organic agriculture is rapidly expanding in Argentina, the leading agroecological producer in Latin America and second in the world after Australia, as part of a backlash against a model that has disappointed producers and is starting to worry consumers.

According to the intergovernmental Inter American Commission on Organic Agriculture (ICOA), in the Americas there are 9.9 million hectares of certified organic crops, which is 22 per cent of the total global land devoted to these crops. Of this total, 6.8 million of hectares are in Latin America and the Caribbean, and three million in Argentina alone.

The Argentine National Agrifood Health and Quality Service (SENASA) reported that between 2014 and 2015, the land area under organic production grew 10 per cent, including herbs, vegetables, legumes, fruits, cereals and oilseeds.

Legumes and vegetables experienced the largest increase (200 percent). In Argentina there are 1,074 organic producers, mainly small and medium-size farms and cooperatives.

“The organic market is starting to boom. We have been producing since 20 years ago, when this market did not exist in Argentina and we exported everything. Now we sell abroad, but about 50 percent remains here,” said Jorge Pierrestegui, manager of San Nicolás Olive Groves and Vineyards, an agroecology company that produces olives and olive oil on some 1,000 hectares in the Argentine province of Córdoba.

“Opting for organic was a company policy, mainly due to a long-term ecological vision of not spraying the fields with poisonous chemicals,” Pierrestegui said.

Written by Randy McDonald

December 28, 2016 at 2:30 pm