A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘latin america

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

leave a comment »

  • Antipope’s Charlie Stross worries about the literal survival of Britons in the post-Brexit United Kingdom.
  • D-Brief notes the discovery of an ancient corpse in China shrouded in cannabis.
  • Dangerous Minds reports on a 1971 BBC documentary about New York City starring a pre-stardom Patti Smith.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to a study mapping the changing clouds of the twin brown dwarfs of Luhman 16.
  • The Dragon’s Tales reports on drops in atmospheric oxygen over the past hundred thousand years.
  • Language Hat reports on Italy’s many dialects and their uses.
  • Language Log engages with Trump’s non-apology.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money looks at Ted Cruz’s despair.
  • The LRB Blog looks at the classic architecture of Eritrea’s capital, Asmara.
  • The Map Room Blog looks at Karen Margolis’ art maps.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer continues to look at the Colombian referendum and notes on the difficulties of enabling the rule of law in Mexico.
  • Peter Rukavina remembers Prince Edward Island’s Teachernet.
  • Window on Eurasia reports on a provocative argument about Russia’s demographic past and its lop-sided urbanization.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

leave a comment »

  • Astrobeat U>notes the vulnerability of Florida’s Space Coast to Hurricane Matthews.
  • D-Brief notes that the Voyager probes are the most distant US government-owned computers still in service.
  • Dangerous Minds shares high-heeled tentacle shoes.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes that a President Trump would enable anything the Congressional Republicans wanted.
  • The LRB Blog notes Vancouver’s fentanyl crisis.
  • The NYR Daily reports on the lives of dissidents harassed by extralegal detentions.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer maps the recent Columbian referendum and finds that areas beset by FARC actually voted for the peace plan.
  • Gay porn star and sometime political radical Colby Kelly, Towleroad noted, is going to vote for Trump in order to push forward the revolution.
  • Window on Eurasia looks at religious developments in the former Soviet Union.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

leave a comment »

  • At Antipope, Charlie Stross imagines what might become possible with cheap heavy spacelift.
  • blogTO notes the vandalization of the iconic Toronto sign during Nuit Blanche.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to a paper considering the detectability of interstellar comets.
  • Language Log looks at Chinese language transcriptions for Obama, Hillary, and Trump.
  • Marginal Revolution looks at impending hard Brexit and notes how the economy of Thailand is dominated by Bangkok.
  • The NYRB Daily writes at length about its apparent discovery of the identity of Elena Ferrante.
  • Savage Minds shares a Bolivian perspective on Donald Trump.
  • Strange Maps shares a list of ten potential Jewish homelands outside of Palestine.
  • Window on Eurasia looks at quiet Chechen dissidence and warns about the consequences of Putin’s repressions.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell worries about the people soon to be in charge of the United Kingdom’s Brexit negotiations.

[URBAN NOTE] “Mexico City’s Expansion Creates Tension between Residents and Authorities”

The Inter Press Service’s Emilio Godoy describes some of the tensions created around Mexico City as that megalopolis expands.

People living in neighborhoods affected by the expansion of urban construction suffer a “double displacement”, with changes in their habitat and the driving up of prices in the area, in a process in which “we are not taken into account,” said Natalia Lara, a member of an assembly of local residents in the south of Mexico City.

Lara, who is pursuing a master’s degree in public policies at the Latin American School of Social Sciences (Flacso), told IPS that in her neighborhood people are outraged because of the irrational way the construction has been carried out there.

The member of the assembly of local residents of Santa Úrsula Coapa, a lower middle-class neighborhood, complains that urban decision-makers build more houses and buildings but “don’t think about how to provide services. They make arbitrary land-use changes.”

Lara lives near the Mexico City asphalt plant owned by the city’s Ministry of Public Works, which has been operating since 1956 and has become asource of conflict between the residents of the southern neighbourhoods and the administration of leftist Mayor Miguel Mancera of the Party of the Democratic Revolution, which has governed the capital since 1997.

In mid-2014, Mancera’s government announced its intention to donate the asphalt plant’s land to Mexico City’s Investment Promotion Agency, which would build the Coyoacán Economic and Social Development Area there.

Written by Randy McDonald

September 24, 2016 at 8:00 pm

[BLOG] Some Monday links

  • blogTO notes that a half-million dollars does not buy one much of a house in Toronto.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly celebrates the fifth anniversary of her marriage on the Toronto Islands.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze considers exoplanet fatigue in the news, suggesting Proxima b is about as excited as the media will get.
  • Far Outliers looks at the foreign safety zone set up in Nanjing in 1937 as the Japanese approached.
  • Language Hat considers the globalization of Latin American writers.
  • Language Log examines the linguistics behind “hikikomori”.
  • The LRB Blog looks at the British political spectrum.
  • The Map Room Blog reports on some beautiful letterpress maps.
  • Marginal Revolution notes that in Africa, urbanization is not accompanied by economic growth.
  • The NYRB Daily shares vintage photographs of Syria’s Palmyra.
  • Spacing looks at the examples of the Netherlands.
  • Window on Eurasia looks at a call to create a unified Russian diaspora lobby in the United States and examines ethnic Russian migration from Tuva.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

  • At Antipope, Charlie Stross writes about how colonizing even a nearby and Earth-like Proxima Centauri b would be far beyond our abilities.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly responds to Canada’s mourning of the Tragically Hip.
  • Centauri Dreams considers the life that may exist in the oceans of Europa.
  • D-Brief notes an Alaskan village that is being evacuated because of climate change-related erosion.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze notes that Gliese 1132b is likely a Venus analog.
  • The Dragon’s Tales wonders about Titan’s polar regions.
  • False Steps considers the Soviet plans for a substantial lunar settlement.
  • Far Outliers reports on the Czech and Slovak secret agents active in the United States during the First World War.
  • Gizmodo notes the steady spread of lakes on the surface of East Antarctica.
  • Language Hat examines the birth of the modern Uzbeks.
  • Language Log shares bilingual Spanish-Chinese signage from Argentina.
  • Marginal Revolution notes the arrival of tourists in Belgium seeking euthanasia.
  • Maximos62 shares footage from Singapore’s Festival of the Hungry Ghost.
  • Steve Munro notes the little publicity given to the 514 streetcar.
  • Justin Petrone reflects on Estonian stereotypes of Latvia.
  • pollotenchegg looks at the regional demographics of Ukraine.
  • The Russian Demographics Blog notes the inclusion of Cossacks in the Russian census.
  • Strange Maps shares a map of the actually-existing Middle East.
  • Understanding Society examines the interwar ideology of Austrofascism.
  • Window on Eurasia looks at what the Soviet coup attempt in 1991 did and did not do.

[NEWS] Some Tuesday links

  • Bloomberg notes a raid of Amazon’s Japan office by that country’s competition agency.
  • Bloomberg View looks at paranoia about Pokémon Go and suggests China is not trying to overturn the world order.
  • CBC reports on the popular music and dance of Brazil’s slums, and reports on the diet of ancient humans.
  • The Inter Press Service notes that African farmers could feed the world, but first they need to work on their infrastructure.
  • MacLean’s shares the images of 25 Canadian websites of note in the days of the early Internet.
  • Open Democracy calls for reform of British agricultural funding and reports on Venezuela’s hard landing.