A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘lebanon

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • Bad Astronomer considers how a stellar-mass black hole of 70 solar masses got so unaccountably huge.
  • Alex Tolley at Centauri Dreams considers the colours of photosynthesis, and how they might reveal the existence of life on exoplanets.
  • The Dragon’s Tales shares some links on humans in the Paleolithic.
  • Jonathan Wynn at the Everyday Sociology Blog considers the scripts of jokes.
  • Gizmodo reports on the repurposed China-Netherlands radio telescope operating from an orbit above the far side of the Moon.
  • JSTOR Daily considers the political rhetoric of declinism.
  • Language Log considers the controversy over the future of the apostrophe.
  • James Butler at the LRB Blog notes a YouGov prediction of a Conservative majority in the UK and how this prediction is not value-neutral.
  • Marginal Revolution shares a paper from India noting how caste identities do affect the labour supply.
  • Ursula Lindsay at the NYR Daily considers if the political crisis in Lebanon, a product of economic pressures and sectarianism, might lead to a revolutionary transformation of the country away from sectarian politics.
  • Jim Belshaw at Personal Reflections looks at some of the many complicated and intermingled issues of contemporary Australia.
  • The Planetary Society Blog reports on the latest projects funded by the ESA.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel shares ten beautiful photos taken in 2019 by the Hubble.
  • Strange Company reports on the strange unsolved disappearance of Lillian Richey from her Idaho home in 1964.
  • Window on Eurasia shares a Russian criticism of the Ukrainian autocephalous church as a sort of papal Protestantism.
  • Arnold Zwicky considers the positive potential of homoeros.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • Bad Astronomy notes a new detailed study suggesting that asteroid Hygeia is round. Does this mean it is a dwarf planet?
  • The Buzz notes that the Toronto Public Library has a free booklet on the birds of Toronto available at its branches.
  • Crooked Timber looks forward to a future, thanks to Trump, without the World Trade Organization.
  • D-Brief notes how the kelp forests off California were hurt by unseasonal heat and disease.
  • Bruce Dorminey notes an impending collision of supergalactic clusters.
  • Karen Sternheimer at the Everyday Sociology Blog looks at how judgement can complicate collective action.
  • Language Hat looks at the different definitions of the word “mobile”.
  • Language Log looks at the deep influence of the Persian language upon Marathi.

    Marathi and Persian

  • Erik Loomis at Lawyers, Guns and Money notes how, if anything, climate scientists make conservative claims about their predictions.
  • Marginal Revolution wonders if planned power outages are a good way to deal with the threat of wildfires in California.
  • The NYR Daily looks at the ethnic cleansing being enabled by Turkey in Kurdish Syria.
  • Corey S. Powell at Out There interviews archeologist Arthur Lin about his use of space-based technologies to discovery traces of the past.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer looks at the staggering inequality in Chile, driver of the recent protests.
  • At Roads and Kingdoms, Anthony Elghossain reports from the scene of the mass protests in Lebanon.
  • Drew Rowsome tells how his balcony garden fared this year.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel looks at stellar generations in the universe. (Our sun is a third-generation star.)
  • Strange Company looks at the murder of a girl five years old in Indiana in 1898. Was the neighbor boy twelve years old accused of the crime the culprit?
  • Denis Colombi at Une heure de peine takes a look at social mobility in France.
  • Understanding Society’s Daniel Little considers economic historians and their study of capitalism.
  • Window on Eurasia looks at the pro-Russian policies of the Moldova enclave of Gagauzia, and draws recommendations for Ukraine re: the Donbas.

[NEWS] News from around the world: Cheetos fashion, Gaspé yaks, NL slavery, Lebanon comics, Netflix

  • Oh, why not a fashion show organized around the theme of Cheetos? VICE reports.
  • A farmer in the Gaspé peninsula is trying to retrieve all of his missing yaks. CBC Montreal has it.
  • A Newfoundland researcher and artist is examining the relationship of the island with Atlantic slavery. Global News reports.
  • Atlas Obscura takes a look at the alternative comics scene in the Middle East, centered on Lebanon.
  • Vanity Fair shares an account of how Netflix tried to sell itself, and its model, to Blockbuster and failed.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait reports suggestions the bizarre happenings at Boyajian’s Star could be explained by an evaporating exomoon.
  • Centauri Dreams looks at how the crowdsourced evScope telescope is being used to support the Lucy mission to the Jupiter Trojans.
  • The Crux explains the phenomenon of misophobia.
  • D-Brief shares suggestions that an asteroid collision a half-billion years ago released clouds of dust that, reaching Earth, triggered the mid-Ordovician ice age.
  • Dangerous Minds shares video of a perhaps underwhelming meeting of William Burroughs with Francis Bacon.
  • io9 makes the case for more near-future space exploration movies like Ad Astra.
  • Joe. My. God. notes a Trump retweeting of the lie that Ilham Omar celebrated on 9/11.
  • JSTOR Daily notes how fire could destroy the stressed rainforest of the Amazon.
  • Scott Lemieux at Lawyers, Guns and Money notes how few judges in the US have been impeached.
  • The LRB Blog looks at how the already tenuous position of Haitians in the Bahamas has been worsened by Dorian.
  • The Map Room Blog looks at the importance of the integrity of official maps in the era of Trump.
  • Marginal Revolution looks at the political importance of marriage ceremonies in Lebanon and Gaza.
  • Drew Rowsome interviews the Zakar Twins on the occasion of their new play Pray the Gay Away, playing in Toronto in October.
  • The Russian Demographic Blog shares statistics on birthrates in the different provinces of the Russian Empire circa 1906.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel reports on the first experiment done on the photoelectric effect, revealing quantum mechanics.
  • Window on Eurasia looks at growing anti-Chinese sentiments in Central Asia.
  • Arnold Zwicky looks at “The Hurtful Dog”, a Cyanide and Happiness cartoon.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • Anthro{dendum} features an essay examining trauma and resiliency as encountered in ethnographic fieldwork.
  • Architectuul highlights a new project seeking to promote historic churches built in the United Kingdom in the 20th century.
  • Bad Astronomy’s Phil Plait examines Ahuna Mons, a muddy and icy volcano on Ceres, and looks at the nebula Westerhout 40.
  • Centauri Dreams notes the recent mass release of data from a SETI project, and notes the discovery of two vaguely Earth-like worlds orbiting the very dim Teegarden’s Star, just 12 light-years away.
  • Chris Bertram at Crooked Timber notes that having universities as a safe space for trans people does not infringe upon academic freedom.
  • The Crux looks at the phenomenon of microsleep.
  • D-Brief notes evidence that the Milky Way Galaxy was warped a billion years ago by a collision with dark matter-heavy dwarf galaxy Antlia 2, and notes a robotic fish powered by a blood analogue.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes that India plans on building its own space station.
  • Earther notes the recording of the song of the endangered North Pacific right whale.
  • The Everyday Sociology Blog looks at the role of emotional labour in leisure activities.
  • Far Outliers looks at how Japan prepared for the Battle of the Leyte Gulf in 1944.
  • Gizmodo looks at astronomers’ analysis of B14-65666, an ancient galactic collision thirteen billion light-years away, and notes that the European Space Agency has a planned comet interception mission.
  • io9 notes how the plan for Star Trek in the near future is to not only have more Star Trek, but to have many different kinds of Star Trek for different audiences.
  • Joe. My. God. notes the observation of Pete Buttigieg that the US has probably already had a gay president.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at the many ways in which the rhetoric of Celtic identity has been used, and notes that the archerfish uses water ejected from its eyes to hunt.
  • Language Hat looks at why Chinese is such a hard language to learn for second-language learners, and looks at the Suso monastery in Spain, which played a key role in the coalescence of the Spanish language.
  • Language Log looks at the complexities of katakana.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes the death of deposed Egypt president Mohammed Morsi looks like a slow-motion assassination, and notes collapse of industrial jobs in the Ohio town of Lordstown, as indicative of broader trends.
  • The LRB Blog looks at the death of Mohamed Morsi.
  • The Map Rom Blog shares a new British Antarctic Survey map of Greenland and the European Arctic.
  • Marginal Revolution notes how non-religious people are becoming much more common in the Middle East, and makes the point that the laying of cable for the transatlantic telegraph is noteworthy technologically.
  • Noah Smith at Noahpionion takes the idea of the Middle East going through its own version of the Thirty Years War seriously. What does this imply?
  • The NYR Daily takes a look at a Lebanon balanced somehow on the edge, and looks at the concentration camp system of the United States.
  • The Planetary Society Blog explains what people should expect from LightSail 2, noting that the LightSail 2 has launched.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw points readers to his stories on Australian spy Harry Freame.
  • Rocky Planet explains, in the year of the Apollo 50th anniversary, why the Moon matters.
  • Drew Rowsome reviews, and praises, South African film Kanarie, a gay romp in the apartheid era.
  • The Russian Demographics Blog links to a paper examining the relationship between childcare and fertility in Belgium, and looks at the nature of statistical data from Turkmenistan.
  • The Strange Maps Blog shares a map highlighting different famous people in the United States.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel explains why different galaxies have different amounts of dark matter, and shares proof that the Apollo moon landings actually did happen.
  • Towleroad notes the new evidence that poppers, in fact, are not addictive.
  • Window on Eurasia warns about the parlous state of the Volga River.
  • Arnold Zwicky takes an extended look at the mid-20th century gay poet Frank O’Hara.

[MUSIC] Five music links: parents’ music, Carly Rae Jepsen, Grimes, Mashrou’ Leila, Cranberries

  • JSTOR Daily notes a study examining how we can be nostalgic for the music of our parents.
  • Hornet Stories notes the new album and tour of Carly Rae Jepsen.
  • This Crack Magazine interview with Grimes has been getting a lot of attention, not necessarily positively mind.
  • Hornet Stories highlights the innovative and queer-fronted Lebanese band Mashrou’ Leila.
  • Adam Wallis at Global News has an extended feature interviewing the surviving members of the Cranberries about their career and their final album, In The End.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

  • Centauri Dreams celebrates the arrival, and successful data collection, of New Horizons at Ultima Thule, as does Joe. My. God., as does
    Emily Lakdawalla at the Planetary Society Blog. Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel explained, before the New Horizons flyby of Ultima Thule, why that Kuiper Belt object was so important for planetary science.
  • In advance of the New Year’s, Charlie Stross at Antipope asked his readers to let him know what good came in 2018.
  • Chris Bertram at Crooked Timber makes the argument that, in the event of a Brexit bitterly resented by many Labour supporters, the odds that they will support a post-Brexit redistributionist program that would aid predominantly pro-Brexit voters are low.
  • Bruce Dorminey notes that many Earth-like worlds might be made uninhabitable over eons by the steady warming of their stars, perhaps dooming any hypothetical extraterrestrial civilizations on these planets.
  • Far Outliers looks at the patterns of early Meiji Japan relations with Korea, noting an 1873 invasion scare.
  • L.M. Sacasas writes at The Frailest Thing, inspired by the skepticism of Jacques Ellul, about a book published in 1968 containing predictions about the technological world of 2018. Motives matter.
  • Imageo looks at the evidence from probes and confirms that, yes, it does in fact snow (water) on Mars.
  • The Island Review interviews author Adam Nicolson about his family’s ownership of the Hebridean Shiant Isles. What do they mean for him, as an author and as someone experience with the sea?
  • JSTOR Daily looks at the long history of the human relationship with leather, as a pliable material for clothing of all kinds.
  • Language Hat considers the possibility that the New Year’s greeting “bistraynte”, used in Lebanon and by Christians in neighbouring countries, might come from the Latin “strenae”.
  • Language Log notes the pressure being applied against the use of Cantonese as a medium of instruction in Hong Kong.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money looks at the many reasons why a considerable number of Latinos support Donald Trump.
  • Bernard Porter at the LRB Blog comes up with an explanation as to Corbyn’s refusal to oppose Brexit.
  • Marginal Revolution notes the many problems involved with the formation of supply chains in Africa, including sheer distance.
  • The NYR Daily has a much-needed reevaluation of the Jonestown horror as not simply a mass suicide.
  • Author Peter Watts writes about a recent trip to Tel Aviv.
  • At Out There, Corey Powell writes about how planetary scientists over the decades have approached their discipline, expecting to be surprised.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel shared some top images collected by Hubble in 2018.
  • Strange Company looks at the strange 1953 death of young Roman woman Wilma Montesi. How did she die, leaving her body to be found on a beach?
  • Window on Eurasia notes how Circassian refugees in Syria are asking for the same expedited status that Ukrainian refugees have received.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell takes an extended look at the politics of 4G and Huawei and the United Kingdom and transatlantic relations over the past decade.
  • Arnold Zwicky takes a look, in language and cartoons, at “Jesus fuck”.