A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘librairies

[PHOTO] Bloor/Gladstone aglow

Bloor/Gladstone aglow #toronto #bloorcourt #bloorstreetwest #bloorgladstonelibrary #night #latergram

Written by Randy McDonald

September 12, 2017 at 7:00 am

[PHOTO] Four articles about photography: Instagram, HIV/AIDS, Instagram hunks, Google photo apps

  • I am impressed by the scope, if nothing else, of this plan to archive everything on Instagram. VICE reports.
  • I really hope that Instagram’s The AIDS Memorial Account remains active. It’s a vital online archive of who we lost. Hornet Stories reports on this account’s problems.
  • Hornet Stories reports on how gay NYC comedian Matt Grote decided to play with the tropes of the Instagram hunk. Intriuging..
  • Wired notes a powerful, high-speed Google algorithm that does photo retouching very quickly. Not sure how I feel.

Written by Randy McDonald

September 9, 2017 at 9:45 pm

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

  • Centauri Dreams notes one source suggesting red dwarf stars may produce too little ultraviolet to spark life on their planets.
  • Hornet Stories notes how LGBTQ Dreamers will be hit badly by the repeal of DACA.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money approves of Frederick Crews’ critical takedown of Freud as a scientist.
  • The LRB Blog looks at a new South Korean film examining the Gwangju massacre of 1980.
  • The NYR Daily notes that China seems set to head into a new era of strict censorship, with calamitous results.
  • The Planetary Society Blog considers the 40th anniversary of the Voyagers in the light of the Pale Blue Dot of Carl Sagan.
  • The Signal reports that, for archivists’ purposes, online newspaper sites are actually very poorly organized.
  • At Spacing, Adam Bunch notes how Upper Canadian governor John Simcoe’s abolition of slavery was not quite that.
  • Window on Eurasia notes the continued official contortions around Circassian history in Russia.

[URBAN NOTE] Five Toronto links: DuEast, Main Square, Sherway Gardens, Pam McConnell, rare books

  • blogTO notes the new name of Toronto’s Regent Park, “DuEast”, after Dundas Street East.
  • In the Toronto Star, Shawn Micallef argues a recent festival shows the potential of east-end high-rise neighbourhood Main Square.
  • Also in the Star, Francine Kopun looks at the half-billion dollars put into renovating Sherway Gardens.
  • Ainslie Cruickshank reports on how the many who care for late councilor Pam McConnell are mourning her.
  • In The Globe and Mail, Miriam Katawazi reports on finds from remarkable, long-delayed inventory of the Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library.

[PHOTO] Main room, Confederation Centre Public Library, Charlottetown

Main room, Confederation Centre Public Library #pei #princeedwardisland #charlottetown #library #ccpl #confederationcentreofthearts #confederationcentrepubliclibrary

The Confederation Centre Public Library, centrepiece of the Prince Edward Island public library system, is housed in one of the Confederation Centre of the Arts’ brutalist buildings. The library is shaped by this vast central chamber.

[PHOTO] Three photos from the Lillian H. Smith Library, Toronto

Toronto’s Lillian H. Smith Library, located on 239 College Street just east of Spadina Avenue is one of my favourite libraries. Housed in a handsome building faced with yellow brick, the Lillian H. Smith branch–named after a pioneering early 20th century children’s librarian–stands out as the home to two special collections, the Merril Collection of Science Fiction, Speculation & Fantasy on the third floor and the Osborne Collection of Early Children’s Books on the fourth.

Today, when I was looking down from the fourth floor, it struck me that the interior of the Lillian H. Smith Library is quite similar to that of the Toronto Reference Library, the different floors wrapped around an atrium stretching almost to the ceiling. Both are all heights, but the Lillian H. Smith features a classy pairing of polished concrete with wood and warm carpets. My compliments to the architect, clearly!

Four floors down

Three by three

Downwards curve

Written by Randy McDonald

August 23, 2017 at 7:00 am

[PHOTO] Three views from the fifth floor, Toronto Reference Library, looking north, east and west

The location of the Toronto Reference Library north and east of Yonge and Bloor, directly east of Yorkville and directly south of Rosedale, means that well-positioned photographers can take advantage of some excellent views. The first two photos are of Rosedale, green with trees and dense with houses, while the third is a photo of a Yorkville well into its condoization.

North past Church Street #toronto #torontoreferencelibrary #rosedale #churchstreet #skyline

East along Church Street #toronto #torontoreferencelibrary #rosedale #churchstreet #skyline

Yorkville transforming, west of Yonge #toronto #torontoreferencelibrary #yorkville #yongestreet #condos #evening

Written by Randy McDonald

August 19, 2017 at 5:00 pm

[PHOTO] Three photos from the inside of the Toronto Reference Library

Teddy bear with deerstalker and pipe #toronto #torontoreferencelibrary #teddybear #deerstalkerhat #arthurconandoylecollection

I like a friend’s suggestion that this teddy bear, on display in the Arthur Conan Doyle Collection at the Toronto Reference Library, should bear the name of Bearlock Holmes.

Looking down from the fifth floor #toronto #torontoreferencelibrary #architecture

Two by two, looking down #toronto #torontoreferencelibrary #architecture

Stepping outside the collection, on the fifth floor of the Reference Library, and looking down to the ground floor in the vast interior, the impressive scale of the edifice becomes clear.

Written by Randy McDonald

August 18, 2017 at 11:00 pm

[URBAN NOTE] Five Toronto links: the Toronto Public Library, Hanlan’s, parks, and Montréal laneways

  • blogTO notes that the Toronto Reference Library will be holding a huge sale again next week.
  • Inside Toronto profiles Sephora Hussein, new collection head of the Merril Collection.
  • Michael Lyons writes about the importance of the newly-reopened Hanlan’s beach on the Toronto Islands.
  • Jake Tobin Garrett argues at Torontoist for the importance of the proposed Rail Deck Park.
  • Emily Macrae argues at Torontoist there is much Toronto can learn from the green–literally–laneways of Montréal.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait is skeptical that the Trump-era EPA will deal well with global warming.
  • Discover’s The Crux considers the challenge of developing safer explosives for fireworkers.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to a paper considering the (real) possibility of Earth-like worlds orbiting neutron stars.
  • Language Log notes an odd use of katakana in Australia.
  • The LRB Blog considers the possibly overrated import of George Osborne’s move into the newspaper business.
  • Marginal Revolution notes one observer’s suggestion that China could sustain high-speed growth much longer than Japan.
  • The NYR Daily shares Eleanor Davis’ cartoon journal of her bike trip across America.
  • Peter Rukavina does not like the odd way Prince Edward Island made its library card into a museum pass.
  • Starts with a Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes the odd galaxy MACS2129-1, young yet apparently no longer star-forming.
  • Strange Company explores the strange death of 17th century New England woman Rebecca Cornell.
  • Unicorn Booty looks at how early Playgirl tried to handle, quietly, its substantially gay readership.
  • Window on Eurasia looks at one Russian proclaiming Russia needs to stop an imminent takeover by Muslims.