A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘libraries

[URBAN NOTE] Five notes about cities: parks, productivity, suburbs, borders, libraries

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  • CityLab looks at a new study examining the relationship between gentrification and new city parks.
  • Guardian Cities looks at the hardest-working cities in the world, and wonders if that duration of work is a good idea.
  • The Conversation looks at how population growth in Canada is increasingly concentrated in car-dependent suburbs.
  • VICE looks at how arbitrary municipal borders in built-up areas can have nasty effects on the lives of people caught up by them.
  • Rabble reports on how Canadian libraries are handling the opioid crisis.

[URBAN NOTE] Five city links: Milton, Hamilton, New York City, Mexico City, Tel Aviv

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  • MacLean’s reports from the GTA suburban city of Milton, a key battleground in the federal election.
  • Hamilton police continues to be caught up in controversy over its handling of Pride. Global News reports.
  • CityLab profiles new murals being created in New York City’s Harlem, on 125th street, here.
  • Guardian Cities considers some ambitious plans for remodeling Mexico City, with vast new neighbourhoods and airports, which never came off.
  • Atlas Obscura looks at a notable library of books and other documents in the Yiddish language, housed out of a decrepit bus terminal in Tel Aviv.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

  • The Buzz shares a TIFF reading list, here.
  • Centauri Dreams notes the growing sensitivity of radial velocity techniques in finding weird exoplanet HR 5183 b, here.
  • The Crux reports on circumgalactic gas and the death of galaxies.
  • Dead Things notes the import of the discovery of the oldest known Australopithecine skull.
  • Dangerous Minds reports on pioneering 1930s queer artist Hannah Gluckstein, also known as Gluck.
  • Gizmodo notes that, for an unnamed reason, DARPA needs a large secure underground testing facility for tomorrow.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at how Jim Crow laws affected Mexican immigrants in the early 20th century US.
  • Language Hat looks at a new project to study Irish texts and language over centuries.
  • Language Log shares some Chinglish signs from a top university in China.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money shares an interview with Jeffrey Melnick suggesting Charles Manson was substantially a convenient boogeyman.
  • Marginal Revolution shares a paper suggesting marijuana legalization is linked to declining crime rates.
  • Susan Neiman at the NYR Daily tells how she began her life as a white woman in Atlanta and is ending it as a Jewish woman in Berlin.
  • The Planetary Society Blog looks at Hayabusa2 at Ryugu.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel celebrated the 230th anniversary of Enceladus, the Saturn moon that might harbour life.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how global warming is harming the rivers of Siberia, causing many to run short.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

  • Architectuul notes a bike tour of Bauhaus architecture in Berlin.
  • Bad Astronomy Phil Plait notes the discovery of Beta Pictoris c, a second super-Jovian planet in that young system.
  • Centauri Dreams notes that the NASA Europa Clipper is moving ahead.
  • Crooked Timber shares a gorgeous night photo of San Giorgio Maggiore, in Venice.
  • The Crux notes what we are learning about the Denisovans.
  • D-Brief notes that Neanderthals were prone to swimmer’s ear.
  • Dangerous Minds looks at some of the pop culture likes of Karl Marx.
  • Drew Ex Machina’s Andrew LePage looks at the exoplanets of GJ 1061.
  • Earther notes how Icelanders mourned the loss of a glacier in a ceremony.
  • Whitney Kimball at Gizmodo looks at what the mass data loss of more than a decade’s worth of music at Myspace means for our Internet era.
  • Imageo shares photos of spiraling cloud formations photographed at night from space.
  • Ian Humberstone at The Island Review writes about his witnessing of the bonxies, birds of the Shetlands.
  • Joe. My. God. notes a report suggesting Trump joked about swapping Greenland for Puerto Rico.
  • JSTOR Daily notes how the rhythmic dancing of the Shakers in 18th century America marked that sect as different.
  • Language Hat considers the humour of some philosophers.
  • Language Log notes the oblique commentaries of Hong Kong tycoon Li Ka-shing on his city-state’s protests.
  • Erik Loomis at Lawyers, Guns and Money notes the idiocy of the Trump fetish for Greenland.
  • The Map Room Blog notes how astronomers have mapped the Local Void, of deep intergalactic space.
  • Marginal Revolution wonders if the future of Venice might be found in its becoming a Chinese portal into Europe.
  • Sean Marshall notes how the Ford government is undermining conservation in Ontario.
  • The NYR Daily shares some of the New York City photography of Phil Penman.
  • Starts With A Bang’s notes the immense storms of Saturn.
  • Strange Company shares a weekend collection of links.
  • Window on Eurasia looks at how Belarus plans on reorganizing its internal structures to try to minimize rural depopulation.
  • Nick Rowe at Worthwhile Canadian Initiative talks about monetary policy in metaphors.
  • Arnold Zwicky looks at some penguins from around the world.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

  • Matt Thompson at anthro{dendum} writes about the complex, often anthropological, satire in the comics of Charles Addams.
  • Architectuul looks at the photography of Roberto Conte.
  • Bad Astronomy’s Phil Plait notes a new computer model suggesting a supernova can be triggered by throwing a white dwarf into close orbit of a black hole.
  • D-Brief notes how ammonia on the surface of Pluto hints at the existence of a subsurface ocean.
  • Bruce Dorminey notes how the bombardment of Earth by debris from a nearby supernova might have prompted early hominids to become bipedal.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes that NASA has awarded its first contract for its plans in lunar space.
  • Far Outliers notes the reactions, within and without the Soviet Union, to the 1991 Soviet coup attempt.
  • Matt Novak at Gizmodo’s Paleofuture notes how, in 1995, Terry Pratchett predicted the rise of online Nazis.
  • io9 notes the impending physical release this summer of DVDs of the Deep Space Nine documentary What We Left Behind.
  • JSTOR Daily suggests some ways to start gardening in your apartment.
  • Victor Mair at Language Log claims that learning Literary Chinese is a uniquely difficult experience. Thoughts?
  • The NYR Daily features a wide-ranging interview with EU official Michel Barnier focused particularly, but not exclusively, on Brexit.
  • The Planetary Society Blog notes that an Internet vote has produced a majority in favour of naming outer system body 2007 OR10 Gonggang.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer considers the possibility that foreign investors in Mexico might be at risk, at least feel themselves at risk, from the government of AMLO.
  • The Signal looks at how the Library of Congress archives spreadsheets.
  • Van Waffle at the Speed River Journal looks at magenta spreen, a colourful green that he grows in his garden.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes how we on Earth are carelessly wasting irreplaceable helium.
  • Window on Eurasia refers to reports claiming that a third of the population of Turkmenistan has fled that Central Asian state. Could this be accurate?

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • Architectuul looks at the history of brutalism in late 20th century Turkey.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait looks at the evidence for the Milky Way Galaxy having seen a great period of starburst two billion years ago, and notes how crowded the Milky Way Galaxy is in the direction of Sagittarius.
  • Centauri Dreams considers if astrometry might start to become useful as a method for detecting planets, and considers what the New Horizons data, to Pluto and to Ultima Thule, will be known for.
  • Belle Waring at Crooked Timber considers if talk of forgiveness is, among other things, sound.
  • D-Brief considers the possibility that the differing natures of the faces of the Moon can be explained by an ancient dwarf planet impact, and shares images of dust-ringed galaxy NGC 4485.
  • Dead Things notes the discovery of fossil fungi one billion years old in Nunavut.
  • Far Outliers looks at how, over 1990, Russia became increasingly independent from the Soviet Union, and looks at the final day in office of Gorbachev.
  • Gizmodo notes the discovery of literally frozen oceans of water beneath the north polar region of Mars, and looks at an unusual supernova, J005311 ten thousand light-years away in Cassiopeia, product of a collision between two white dwarfs.
  • JSTOR Daily notes how the colour of navy blue is a direct consequence of slavery and militarism, and observes the historical influence, or lack thereof, of Chinese peasant agriculture on organic farming in the US.
  • Language Log considers a Chinese-language text from San Francisco combining elements of Mandarin and Cantonese.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes the terrible environmental consequences of the Vietnam War in Southeast Asia, and Shakezula at Lawyers, Guns and Money takes a look at how, and perhaps why, Sam Harris identifies milkshake-throwing at far-right people as a form of “mock assassination”.
  • The Map Room Blog shares a personal take on mapmaking on the Moon during the Apollo era.
  • Marginal Revolution observes a paper suggesting members of the Chinese communist party are more liberal than the general Chinese population. The blog also notes how Soviet quotas led to a senseless and useless mass slaughter of whales.
  • Russell Darnley writes about the complex and tense relationship between Indonesia and Australia, each with their own preoccupations.
  • Martin Filler writes at the NYR Daily about I.M. Pei as an architect specializing in an “establishment modernism”. The site also takes a look at Orientalism, as a phenomenon, as it exists in the post-9/11 era.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw reflects on the meaning of Australia’s New England.
  • The Planetary Society Blog notes how Hayabusa 2 is having problems recovering a marker from asteroid Ryugu.
  • Peter Rukavina reports on an outstanding Jane Siberry concert on the Island.
  • The Russian Demographics Blog shares a map of homophobia in Europe.
  • The Signal looks at how the Library of Congress makes use of wikidata.
  • The Speed River Journal’s Van Waffle reports, with photos, from his latest walks this spring.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel considers what the Earth looked like when hominids emerged, and explains how amateur astronomers can capture remarkable images.
  • Frank Jacobs at Strange Maps shares a controversial map depicting the shift away from CNN towards Fox News across the United States.
  • Daniel Little at Understanding Society examines the Boeing 737 MAX disaster as an organizational failure.
  • Window on Eurasia looks why Turkey is backing away from supporting the Circassians, and suggests that the use of the Russian Orthodox Church by the Russian state as a tool of its rule might hurt the church badly.
  • Arnold Zwicky takes apart, linguistically and otherwise, a comic playing on the trope of Lassie warning about something happening to Timmy. He also
    reports on a far-removed branch of the Zwicky family hailing from Belarus, as the Tsvikis.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • Architectuul notes the recent death of I.M. Pei.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes what, exactly, rubble-pile asteroids are.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly writes about definitions of home.
  • Centauri Dreams considers white dwarf planets.
  • The Crux notes how ultra-processed foods are liked closely to weight gain.
  • D-Brief observes that a thin layer of insulating ice might be saving the subsurface oceans of Pluto from freezing out.
  • Bruce Dorminey notes the critical role played by Apollo 10 in getting NASA ready for the Moon landings.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes the American government’s expectation that China will seek to set up its own global network of military bases.
  • Andrew LePage at Drew Ex Machina reports on the Soviet Union’s Venera 5 and 6 missions to Venus.
  • Far Outliers looks at the visit of U.S. Grant to Japan and China.
  • Gizmodo notes a recent analysis of Neanderthal teeth suggesting that they split with Homo sapiens at a date substantially earlier than commonly believed.
  • io9 notes the sheer scale of the Jonathan Hickman reboots for the X-Men comics of Marvel.
  • Joe. My. God. shares the argument of Ted Cruz that people should stop making fun of his “space pirate” suggestion.I am inclined to think Cruz more right than not, actually.
  • JSTOR Daily notes the wave of anti-black violence that hit the United States in 1919, often driven by returned veterans.
  • Language Hat shares a recognizable complaint, written in ancient Akkadian, of bad customers.
  • Language Log shares a report of a village in Brittany seeking people to decipher a mysterious etching.
  • This Scott Lemieux report at Lawyers, Guns and Money about how British conservatives received Ben Shapiro is a must-read summary.
  • Benjamin Markovits at the LRB Blog shares the reasons why he left his immigrant-heavy basketball team in Germany.
  • Marginal Revolution looks at one effort in Brazil to separate people from their street gangs.
  • The NYR Daily looks at how ISIS, deprived of its proto-state, has managed to thrive as a decentralized network.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw tells of his experiences and perceptions of his native region of New England, in southeastern Australia.
  • The Planetary Society Blog notes how the Chang’e 4 rover may have found lunar mantle on the surface of the Moon.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer notes that while Argentine president Mauricio Macri is polling badly, his opponents are not polling well.
  • Roads and Kingdoms shares a list of things to do in see in the Peru capital of Lima.
  • The Signal examines how the Library of Congress engages in photodocumentation.
  • Van Waffle at the Speed River Journal explains how he is helping native insects by planting native plants in his garden.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes how scientific illiteracy should never be seen as cool.
  • Towleroad notes the questions of Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez as to why Truvada costs so much in the United States.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how family structures in the North Caucasus are at once modernizing and becoming more conservative.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell notes how the distribution of US carriers and their fleets at present does not support the idea of a planned impending war with Iran.
  • Arnold Zwicky examines the tent caterpillar of California.