A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘libya

[BLOG] Some Monday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait observes that a team may have discovered the elusive neutron star produced by Supernova 1987A, hidden behind a cloud of dust.
  • Chris Bertram at Crooked Timber shares a photo he made via the time-consuming 19th century wet-plate collodion method.
  • Drew Ex Machina’s Andrew LePage looks at the Apollo 12 visit to the Surveyor 3 site to, among other things, see what it might suggest about future space archeology.
  • Karen Sternheimer at the Everyday Sociology Blog looks at the story of rural poverty facing a family in Waverly, Ohio, observing how it is a systemic issue.
  • George Dvorsky at Gizmodo looks at how Mars’ Jezero crater seems to have had a past relatively friendly to life, good for the next NASA rover.
  • Joe. My. God. reports on the latest ignorance displayed by Donald Trump Jr. on Twitter, this time regarding HIV.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at how Climategate was used to undermine popular opinion on climate change.
  • Language Hat links to an article explaining why so many works of classical literature were lost, among other things not making it onto school curricula.
  • Language Log shares a photo of a Muji eraser with an odd English label.
  • Scott Lemieux at Lawyers, Guns and Money suggests Pete Buttigieg faces a campaign-limiting ceiling to his support among Democrats.
  • The LRB Blog argues that Macron’s blocking of EU membership possibilities for the western Balkans is a terrible mistake.
  • The Map Room Blog shares a map depicting regional variations in Canada towards anthropogenic climate change. Despite data issues, the overall trend of oil-producing regions being skeptical is clear.
  • Marginal Revolution links to a paper examining the slowing pace of labour mobility in the US, suggesting that home attachment is a key factor.
  • Frederic Wehrey at the NYR Daily tells the story of Knud Holmboe, a Danish journalist who came to learn about the Arab world working against Italy in Libya.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel explains why thermodynamics does not explain our perception of time.
  • Understanding Society’s Dan Little looks at Electronic Health Records and how they can lead to medical mistakes.
  • Whatever’s John Scalzi shares a remarkable photo of the night sky he took using the astrophotography mode on his Pixel 4 phone.
  • Window on Eurasia shares an opinion that the Intermarium countries, between Germany and Russia, can no longer count on the US and need to organize in their self-defense.
  • Arnold Zwicky shares a photo of his handsome late partner Jacques Transue, taken as a college student.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • Centauri Dreams notes how gas giants on eccentric orbits can easily disrupt bodies on orbits inwards.
  • Maria Farrell at Crooked Timber suggests that the political culture of England has been deformed by the trauma experienced by young children of the elites at boarding schools.
  • Dangerous Minds looks at the haunting art of Paul Delvaux.
  • The Everyday Sociology Blog looks at the work of Tressie McMillan Cottom in investigating for-profit higher education.
  • Far Outliers looks at Tripoli in 1801.
  • Gizmodo shares the Boeing design for the moon lander it proposes for NASA in 2024.
  • io9 shares words from cast of Terminator: Dark Fate about the importance of the Mexican-American frontier.
  • JSTOR Daily makes a case against killing spiders trapped in one’s home.
  • Language Hat notes a recovered 17th century translation of a Dutch bible into the Austronesian language of Siraya, spoken in Taiwan.
  • Language Log looks at the origin of the word “brogue”.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money looks at the payday lender industry.
  • Marginal Revolution notes a new biography of Walter Raleigh, a maker of empire indeed.
  • The NYR Daily looks at a new dance show using the rhythms of the words of writer Robert Walser.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel looks at how, in a quantum universe, time and space could still be continuous not discrete.
  • Strange Company looks at a court case from 1910s Brooklyn, about a parrot that swore.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy notes an affirmative action court case in which it was ruled that someone from Gibraltar did not count as Hispanic.
  • Window on Eurasia notes rhetoric claiming that Russians are the largest divided people on the Earth.
  • Arnold Zwicky looks at lizards and at California’s legendary Highway 101.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

  • At anthro{dendum}, Amarilys Estrella writes about the aftermath of a car accident she experienced while doing fieldwork.
  • Architectuul notes at a tour of Berlin looking at highlights from an innovative year for architecture in West Berlin back in 1987.
  • Bad Astronomer notes that interstellar comet 2/Borisov is behaving surprisingly normally.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly writes briefly about the difficulty, and the importance, of being authentic.
  • Centauri Dreams shares some of the recent findings of Voyager 2 from the edge of interstellar space.
  • Crooked Timber shares a photo of a courtyard in Montpellier.
  • D-Brief notes a study of the genetics of ancient Rome revealing that the city once was quite cosmopolitan, but that this cosmopolitanism passed, too.
  • Dangerous Minds notes a 1972 single where Marvin Gaye played the Moog.
  • Cody Delistraty looks at Degas and the opera.
  • Bruce Dorminey makes a case, scientific and otherwise, against sending animals into space.
  • Far Outliers looks at a 1801 clash between the American navy and Tripoli pirates.
  • Gizmodo notes a theory that ancient primates learned to walk upright in trees.
  • Joe. My. God. notes that the Cayman Islands overturned a court ruling calling for marriage equality.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at the experience of women under Reconstruction.
  • Language Hat notes the exceptional multilingualism of the Qing empire.
  • Language Log looks at circumstances where the Roman alphabet is used in contemporary China.
  • Erik Loomis at Lawyers, Guns and Money notes the forced resignation of Evo Morales in Bolivia, and calls for readers to take care with their readings on the crisis and the country.
  • Marginal Revolution considers a new sociological theory suggesting that the medieval Christian church enacted policy which made the nuclear family, not the extended family, the main structure in Europe and its offshoots.
  • Sean Marshall takes a look at GO Transit fare structures, noting how users of the Kitchener line may pay more than their share.
  • Neuroskeptic takes a look at the contradictions between self-reported brain activity and what brain scanners record.
  • Alex Hutchinson writes at the NYR Daily about human beings and their relationship with wilderness.
  • Jim Belshaw at Personal Reflections considers the impact of drought in Australia’s New England, and about the need for balances.
  • The Planetary Society Blog offers advice for people interested in seeing today’s transit of Mercury across the Sun.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer suggests Argentines may not have cared about their national elections as much as polls suggested.
  • Peter Rukavina shares an image of an ancient Charlottetown traffic light, at Prince and King.
  • The Russian Demographics Blog notes the significant convergence, and remaining differences, between East and West Germany.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel looks at some of the backstory to the Big Bang.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy suggests the Paris Accords were never a good way to deal with climate change.
  • Window on Eurasia shares someone arguing the policies of Putin are simple unoriginal Bonapartism.
  • Worthwhile Canadian Economy makes the case that slow economic recoveries are deep economic recoveries.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell looks at how the failure of the media to serve as effective critics of politics has helped lead, in the UK of Brexit, to substantial political change.
  • Arnold Zwicky considers the idea, first expressed in comics, of Russian sardines.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

  • Charlie Stross at Antipope has an open thread regarding Brexit.
  • Centauri Dreams considers the dust lanes of the solar system.
  • D-Brief reports on the discovery of the first confirmed skull piece of a Denisovan.
  • Dangerous Minds considers the filmic history of Baron Munchausen.
  • JSTOR Daily considers the past of the Monroe Doctrine, as a marker of American power over the Western Hemisphere.
  • Language Log notes that “frequency illusion”, a 2005 coinage of Arnold Zwicky on that blog, has made it to the Oxford English Dictionary. Congratulations!
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes the talents of Pete Buttigieg, someone who (among other things) is fluent in the Norwegian language. Could he be a serious challenger?
  • Oliver Miles at the LRB Blog notes the threat of new locust swarms across the Sahara and into the Middle East.
  • Alex Tabarrok at Marginal Revolution highlights a new paper aiming to predict the future, one that argues that the greatest economic gains will eventually accrue to the densest populations.
  • The NYR Daily reports from the scene in a fragmented Libya.
  • The Planetary Society Blog reports that the OSIRIS-REx probe has detected asteroid Bennu ejecting material into space.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel explains the import of having a supermoon occur on the Equinox this year.
  • Strange Maps’ Frank Jacobs reports a new finding that Mercury actually tends to be the closest planet in the Solar System to Earth.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that fewer Russians than before think highly of the annexation of Crimea.

[URBAN NOTE] Five city links: Kingston, Montréal, Québec City, Tripoli, Tashkent

  • Kingston is expanding and modernizing its docks to accommodate cruise ships, Global News reports.
  • Le Devoir reports on how gentrification in Montréal is pushing artists out of the once-inexpensive Mile-Ex neighbourhood.
  • In an era where Québec City is pushing for more mass transit, the idea of building a third bridge across the St. Lawrence to relieve car congestion is controversial. CTV reports.
  • Guardian Cities reports on how a fairground built in Tripoli by Oscar Neimeyer is falling into, perhaps irreparable, disrepair.
  • Open Democracy reports on how new urban development is pushing out many people from old Tashkent.

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly talks about her experience at the NY Daily News after that newspaper halved its staff.
  • Hornet Stories talks about US Navy drag queen Harper Daniels.
  • io9 notes that Chelsea Cain is returning to Marvel to write for a new mini-series featuring the Vision.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at how oil rigs can spur the growth of coral reefs.
  • Language Hat links to an article examining the growing influence of the English language, to the point it is influencing the grammar of other languages.
  • Dan Nexon at Lawyers, Guns and Money starts an extended analysis of American hegemony post-1992, arguing that any decline has more to do with a lack of cohesion in the “greater West”.
  • The LRB Blog notes the willingness of the British government to allow the extradition of two of its citizens accused of collaborating with ISIS to the US without seeking a guarantee against the death penalty.
  • Marginal Revolution notes that cross-Mediterranean migration to Europe has fallen, mainly as a result of the risk of the crossing and the actions of the Libyan coast guard.
  • The NYR Daily examines the sculpture of Brancusi.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel examines the question of what dark energy actually is and what it means for the future of the universe.
  • Understanding Society’s Daniel Little reviews a book on cyber-security and cyber-threats, and finds little comfort.

[NEWS] Some Thursday links

  • Bloomberg notes the decline of Japan’s solar energy boom with falling subsidies, suggests 1970s-style stagflation will be back, looks at how an urban area in Japan is dealing with overcrowding, looks at Russia-NATO tensions, and examines how Ireland is welcoming British bankers.
  • Bloomberg View looks at the return of Russian tourists to Turkey, notes Russia is not suffering from a brain drain, looks at the Brexit vote as examining the power of the old, and argues the Chilcot report defends Blair from accusations of lying.
  • CBC reports on the end of Blackberry’s manufacturing of the Classic.
  • The Globe and Mail notes that, once, gay white men were on the outside.
  • The Independent describes claims that refugees in Libya who cannot pay their brokers risk being rendered into organs.
  • The Inter Press Service describes the horrors of Sudan and looks at how Russia will use Brexit to fight sanctions in the European Union.
  • MacLean’s reports on the opening up of the Arctic Ocean to fishing and looks at Winnipeg support for Pride in Steinbach.
  • The National Post reports on the plague of Pablo Escobar’s hippos in Colombia, looks at Vietnam’s protests of Chinese military maneuvers, and examines Turkey’s foreign policy catastrophes.
  • Open Democracy notes the desperate need for stability in Libya.
  • The Smithsonian reports on how video games are becoming the stuff of history.