A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘ligo

[NEWS] Five space science links: ocean worlds, M75, wormholes, neutron stars, black holes, LIGO

  • Gizmodo notes the remarkable depth of the oceans of water worlds, going hundreds of kilometres down (or more!).
  • Motherboard reports on the latest Hubble images of Messier 75, a star cluster that is the vestige of a galaxy absorbed into the Milky Way.
  • Matt Williams at Universe Today notes a new study suggesting that, while traversable wormholes might be physically possible without exotic matter, they would not allow for FTL travel.
  • Paul Sutter at Universe Today notes that a closer study of kilonovas might allow for a better understanding of the interior structures of neutron stars.
  • Ars Technica notes that LIGO may have detected a collision between a black hole and a neutron star.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • In an extended meditation, Antipope’s Charlie Stross considers what the domestic architecture of the future will look like. What different technologies, with different uses of space, will come into play?
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait looks at the new SPECULOOS exoplanet hunting telescope, specializing in the search for planets around the coolest stars.
  • The Crux looks at the evolutionary origins of hominins and chimpanzees in an upright walking ape several million years ago.
  • D-Brief notes the multiple detections of gravitational waves made by LIGO.
  • The Dragon’s Tales looks at the development of laser weapons by China.
  • Karen Sternheimer at the Everyday Sociology Blog looks at the gap between social theory and field research.
  • Gizmodo shares an interesting discussion with paleontologists and other dinosaur experts: What would the dinosaurs have become if not for the Chixculub impact?
  • Hornet Stories notes the ways in which the policies of the Satanic Temple would be good for queer students.
  • io9 notes how the Deep Space 9 documentary What We Leave Behind imagines what a Season 8 would have looked like.
  • Joe. My. God. reports that activist Jacob Wohl is apparently behind allegations of a sexual assault by Pete Buttigieg against a subordinate.
  • JSTOR Daily takes a look at the uses of the yellow ribbon in American popular culture.
  • Language Hat shares an account of the life experiences of an Israeli taxi driver, spread across languages and borders.
  • Scott Lemieux at Lawyers, Guns and Money makes deserved fun of Bret Easton Ellis for his claims to having been marginalized.
  • Marginal Revolution considers, briefly, the idea that artificial intelligence might not be harmful to humans. (Why would it necessarily have to be?)
  • The NYR Daily considers a British exhibition of artworks by artists from the former Czechoslovakia.
  • Peter Rukavina looks at gender representation in party caucuses in PEI from the early 1990s on, noting the huge surge in female representation in the Greens now.
  • The Signal looks at how the Library of Congress is preserving Latin American monographs.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel explains how Einstein knew that gravity must bend light.
  • Window on Eurasia explains the sharp drop in the ethnic Russian population of Tuva in the 1990s.

[NEWS] Five D-Brief links: T-rex, hallucinations, LIGO, bacteria, Magellanic Clouds

  • D-Brief notes new evidence that the biggest Tyrannosaurus was the oldest one.
  • D-Brief notes a new study suggesting that hallucinations are the responses of the body to a lack of sensory stimulation.
  • D-Brief notes that LIGO has resumed its hunt for gravitational wave sources.
  • D-Brief notes that antibiotic-resistant bacteria can be found in abundance at wastewater treatment plants.
  • D-Brief notes a new effort to enlist human eyes to detect stellar clusters in the Magellanic Clouds.

Written by Randy McDonald

April 1, 2019 at 10:30 am

[BLOG] Some Monday links

  • Centauri Dreams considers what would be needed, and what would be the use, of a SETI search of Earth’s co-orbitals.
  • John Quiggin at Crooked Timber considers the idea of nature potentially having legal rights in the context of corporations, likewise, actually having such.
  • D-Brief reports that the Mars 2020 probe will bring with it a mini-probe built around a helicopter.
  • io9 notes that writer Jonathan Hickman will be coming back to Marvel to write two new X-Men books this summer.
  • Joe. My. God. notes that a Trump supporter recently arrested for a Mafia slaying had earlier tried to conduct citizen’s arrests of prominent Democrats.
  • Language Hat takes a look at obscenities in Russian that do not quite make it over to English.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money reacts to the massive anti-Brexit protests in the United Kingdom this past weekend.
  • Marginal Revolution discusses just how bad a Brexit is likely to be, or not.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel explains why LIGO and like instruments have not detected gravitational wave sources within our galaxy. (Briefly, they aren’t good enough yet to pick up faint sources.)
  • The Volokh Conspiracy notes that not much new has come from the release of the Mueller investigation summary.
  • Arnold Zwicky builds from a report of a new LGBTQ consumer advocate from Florida, Nik Harris.

[NEWS] Five sci-tech links: Pojang, LIGO, Mars, extraterrestrial life, DM Tauri

  • The 2017 Pojang earthquake in South Korea was caused by an experimental geothermal power plant, water injected into the ground creating new instabilities. VICE reports.
  • Universe Today notes that, newly upgraded, LIGO will begin searching for gravitational waves anew on 1 April.
  • Universe Today examines the factors which making landing large masses on Mars so technically challenging.
  • Universe Today considers which sorts of circumstellar habitable zone are the best to search for seekers of extraterrestrial life.
  • Motherboard notes astronomers’ study of the relatively Sun-like pre-main sequence star of DM Tauri, which may now be forming a solar system like our own.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

  • Bad Astronomy’s Phil Plait reports on the black hole collisions recently identified in a retrospective analysis of data from gravitational-wave detector LIGO, while Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel also writes about the LIGO black hole collision discoveries.
  • Centauri Dreams suggests that a slowing rate of star formation might be necessary for a galaxy to support life like ours.
  • Crooked Timber reports on the outcome of a sort of live-action philosophy experiment, recruiting people to decide on what would be a utopia.
  • The Crux reports on the challenges facing developers of a HIV vaccine.
  • D-Brief notes the circumstances in which men can pass on mitochondrial DNA to their children.
  • Far Outliers notes the fates of some well-placed Korean-Japanese POWs in India.
  • L.M. Sacasas at The Frailest Thing wonders if the existential questions about human life raised by genetic engineering can even be addressed by the liberal-democratic order.
  • Joe. My. God. reports on the worrying possibility of a Bernie Sanders presidential run in 2020.
  • JSTOR Daily reports on the art and the politics of Chinese provocateur Ai Weiwei.
  • Language Hat looks at the smart ways in which the film adaptation of My Brilliant Friend has made use of Neapolitan dialect, as a marker of identity and more.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money looks at what a new Chinese blockbuster film, Operation Red Sea, does and does not say about how Chinese think they could manage the international order.
  • Geoffrey Pullum at Lingua Franca considers the logical paradox behind the idea of a webpage that has links to all other webpages which do not link to themselves.
  • Anna Badhken at the NYR Daily uses Olga Tokarczuk’s new novel Flights and her own experience as an airline passenger to consider the perspectives offered and lost by lofty flight.
  • The Planetary Society Blog’s Jason Davis notes the successful launch of a Soyuz spacecraft two months after October’s abort, carrying with it (among others) Canadian astronaut David Saint-Jacques.
  • Strange Company notes the 1736 Porteous riot in Edinburgh, an event that began with a hanging of a smuggler and ended with a lynching.
  • Towleroad notes that AndrĂ© Aciman is working on a sequel to his novel Call Me By Your Name.
  • Daniel Little at Understanding Society takes a look at the organizational issues involved with governments exercising their will.
  • Ilya Somin at the Volokh Conspiracy makes a good case as to why a second referendum on Brexit would be perfectly legitimate.
  • Window on Eurasia suggests expanding Russian-language instruction in Uzbekistan and Tajikistan has more to deal with the needs of labour migrants.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell responds to Feng Jicai’s book on the Cultural Revolution, Ten Years of Madness.
  • Arnold Zwicky reports on Swiss food, starting with the McRaclette.

[NEWS] Five science links: cocoliztli in Mexico, English forest, geothermal and tidal, space science

  • National Geographic notes a new study suggesting that a salmonella variant was substantially responsible for a mysterious plague, cocoliztli, that depopulated 16th century Mexico.
  • Wired reports on a worthy attempt at environmental engineering in the United Kingdom, an attempt to build a coast-to-coast forest in northern England.
  • National Observer notes that the government of Canada is preparing funding for higher-risk clean power technologies including geothermal and tidal energy.
  • Universe Today’s Matt Williams notes a new study, drawing from LIGO data, determining that at their most massive non-rotating neutron stars can only have 2.16 solar masses.
  • Matt Williams at Universe Today observes the detection of a stellar-mass black hole candidate in the heart of globular cluster NGC 3201. It’s not an intermediate-mass black hole, but it’s something!