A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘local group

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

  • Bad Astronomy notes the mystery of distant active galaxy SDSS J163909+282447.1, with a supermassive black hole but few stars.
  • Centauri Dreams shares a proposal from Robert Buckalew for craft to engage in planned panspermia, seeding life across the galaxy.
  • The Crux looks at the theremin and the life of its creator, Leon Theremin.
  • D-Brief notes that termites cannibalize their dead, for the good of the community.
  • Dangerous Minds looks at William Burroughs’ Blade Runner, an adaptation of a 1979 science fiction novel by Alan Nourse.
  • Bruce Dorminey notes a new study explaining how the Milky Way Galaxy, and the rest of the Local Group, was heavily influenced by its birth environment.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at why the Chernobyl control room is now open for tourists.
  • Dale Campos at Lawyers. Guns and Money looks at the effects of inequality on support for right-wing politics.
  • James Butler at the LRB Blog looks at the decay and transformation of British politics, with Keith Vaz and Brexit.
  • Marginal Revolution shares a paper explaining why queens are more warlike than kings.
  • Omar G. Encarnación at the NYR Daily looks at how Spain has made reparations to LGBTQ people for past homophobia. Why should the United States not do the same?
  • Corey S. Powell at Out There shares his interview with physicist Sean Carroll on the reality of the Many Worlds Theory. There may be endless copies of each of us out there. (Where?)
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel explains why 5G is almost certainly safe for humans.
  • Strange Company shares a newspaper clipping reporting on a haunting in Wales’ Plas Mawr castle.
  • Frank Jacobs at Strange Maps looks at all the different names for Africa throughout the years.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy considers, in the case of the disposal of eastern Oklahoma, whether federal Indian law should be textualist. (They argue against.)
  • Window on Eurasia notes the interest of the government of Ukraine in supporting Ukrainians and other minorities in Russia.
  • Arnold Zwicky looks at syntax on signs for Sloppy Joe’s.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes the good news: The Andromeda Galaxy will collide with the Milky Way in 4.5 billion years, not 3.9 billion!
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes that a new Chinese ground station built in Argentina has not made the promised outreach to locals, with no visitors’ centre and rumours aplenty.
  • Karen Sternheimer at the Everyday Sociology Blog explains the importance of doing literature reviews.
  • Far Outliers notes the Pakhtuns, a Muslim ethnicity of the British Raj in what is now Pakistan noteworthy for being a major source of recruits in the Indian Army.
  • L.M. Sacasas at The Frailest Thing notes Iris Murdoch, particularly her emphasis on learning as a process of engaging with something greater on its terms.
  • Gizmodo reports on how space sciences appreciate the work done by the noble rover Opportunity on Mars.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at how early 20th century African-American artists have represented Haiti in the works.
  • Language Hat takes note of some of the mechanisms by which linguistics can neglect the study of indigenous languages.
  • Language Log takes a look at the Latin motto of the University of Pennsylvania, a source still of unintentional humour.
  • Marginal Revolution takes a look at the high levels of dysfunction in Nigeria, from fighting between herders and farmers to the incapacity of the national government.
  • The NYR Daily takes a look at the concept of internal exile, starting with Russia and spiraling out into the wider world.
  • Peter Rukavina shares a photo of a payphone that is one of the few remaining used artifacts of old Island Tel.
  • The Russian Demographics Blog links to a paper considering the demographic peculiarities of the societies of the semi-periphery as contrasted to those of the core.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes the surprisingly large amount of information astronomers will be able to extract from the first image of an Earth-like exoplanet.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that North Caucasians in Russia no longer stand out as having higher-than-average birth rates in Russia.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait looks at stellar nursery NGC 604 in the Triangulum Galaxy.
  • Centauri Dreams considers what the rings of Saturn indicate about the inner structure, and formation, of Saturn.
  • The Crux looks at the exciting steam-based robot WINE, capable of travelling between asteroids and hopping around larger worlds like Ceres and Europa with steam.
  • D-Brief looks at how the colours of the ocean will change over time, some parts becoming bluer and others greener as phytoplankton populations change.
  • Gizmodo deals critically with the idea that “permatripping” on LSD is possible. At most, the drug might expose underlying issues.
  • Imageo notes that, even with the polar vortex, cold snaps in North America under global warming have been becoming less cold over time.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at how Cutex, in the early 1910s, created a new market for manicures.
  • Language Hat mourns linguist, and fluent speaker of Sumerian, Miguel Civil.
  • Scott Lemieux at Lawyers, Guns and Money notes how there is not a centre in American politics to be exploited by the likes of Howard Schultz, that if anything there is an unrepresented left.
  • Marginal Revolution shares a commenter’s argument–misguided, I think–that a wealth tax would represent a violation of privacy rights.
  • Emily Lakdawalla at the Planetary Society Blog notes that the InSight probe on Mars has placed the Wind and Thermal Shield above its seismometer.
  • At Une heure de peine …, Denis Colombi takes issue with the use of statistics without a deeper understanding as to what they represent.
  • Window on Eurasia suggests that, while a report that Belarus is investigating the possibility of autocephaly for its national church on the Ukrainian model is likely fake news, it may reflect underlying trends.
  • Arnold Zwicky points readers towards the enjoyable music of Americana/folk duo Mandolin Orange.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait shares stunning photos of the Triangulum galaxy.
  • The Crux notes how innovative planning and recovery missions helped many NASA missions, like the Hubble and Kepler telescopes, improve over time.
  • Sea stars on the Pacific coast of North America, D-Brief notes, are starting to die out en masse.
  • David Finger at the Finger Post shows his readers his recent visit to the Incan ruins at Ollantaytambo, in Peru.
  • Gizmodo notes how astronomers accidentally found the dwarf spheroidal galaxy Bedin I a mere 30 million light years away.
  • JSTOR Daily notes the new evidence supporting the arguments of W.E.B. Dubois that black resistance under slavery helped the Confederacy lose the US Civil War.
  • Language Hat notes the discovery of a new trilingual inscription in Iran, one combining the Persian, Elamite, and Babylonian languages.
  • Language Log notes the impending death of the Arabic dialect of old Mosul, and notes what its speakers are said to talk like birds.
  • Scott Lemieux at Lawyers, Guns, and Money thinks that if Cary Booker does not win the Democratic nomination for 2020, he will at least push the discourse leftwards.
  • Marginal Revolution notes new evidence that the post-1492 depopulation of the Americas led directly to the global cooling of the Little Ice Age.
  • Neuroskeptic considers the ways in which emergence, at different levels, could be a property of the human brain.
  • The NYR Daily features an excerpt from the new Édouard Louis book, Who Killed My Father, talking about the evolution relationship with his father over time.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw muses on the potential for a revival of print journalism in Australia.
  • Roads and Kingdoms interviews journalist Jason Rezaian on the subject of his new book about his long imprisonment in Iran.
  • Drew Rowsome writes about how censorship, on Facebook and on Blogspot, harms his writing and his ability to contribute to his communities.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel writes</a about how galaxy clusters lead to the premature death of stellar formation in their component galaxies.
  • Window on Eurasia notes a new poll from Ukraine suggesting most Orthodox Christians there identify with the new Ukrainian national church, not the Russian one.
  • Arnold Zwicky talks about language, editing, and error.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

  • Bad Astronomer notes a serendipitous photo of two galaxies, one in front of the other, and what this photo reveals about their structures.
  • Dangerous Minds notes how, and why, Robert Crumb rejected the Rolling Stones and Mick Jagger.
  • D-Brief notes that every hot Jupiter has clouds on its nightside.
  • Earther notes that, after a century and a half, iguanas have been reintroduced to the largest island in the Galapagos.
  • L.M. Sacasas at The Frailest Thing notes how the data self is a shadow of the social self.
  • Gizmodo shares a stunning photo mosaic by Hubble of the Triangulum Galaxy, third-largest component of the Local Group.
  • JSTOR Daily takes a look at the story of William Faulkner and his engagement with Hollywood.
  • Language Log looks at the possibility of outside influence, from other language groups including Indo-European, on a Sinitic word for “milk”.
  • Marginal Revolution links to a London Review of Books article looking at the different national reactions to Brexit from each of the EU-27.
  • The NYR Daily looks at how Israel is exporting its technologies developed during the occupation of the Palestinians globally.
  • The Russian Demographics Blog looks at the latest census data on the languages spoken in England.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel explains why astronomers have not yet been able to locate (or exclude as a possibility) Planet Nine.
  • Towleroad notes that the homophobia of Bolsonario began to be implemented on his first day as president of Brazil.
  • Daniel Little at Understanding Society takes a look at some sociological examinations of the research university.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that many congregations in the west and centre of Ukraine once links to the Russian Orthodox Church have switched to the new Ukrainian Orthodox Church, but that this has not happened in the east.
  • Arnold Zwicky takes a look at the appearance of a conlang in comics.

[NEWS] Five D-Brief links: Small Magellanic Cloud, Pluto, Neanderthals, Atacama, rogues

  • D-Brief notes that the Small Magellanic Cloud is losing gas, diminishing its future capacity for starbirth.
  • D-Brief notes evidence that the strange ridges of Pluto are legacies of glaciers.
  • Neanderthals, a new analysis shared by D-Brief suggests, suffered from head trauma at rates similar to that of Homo sapiens.
  • D-Brief notes how recent heavy rain in the Atacama Desert of Chile killed many of the local extremophile microbes adapted to desert conditions, with obvious implications for life on Mars.
  • D-Brief notes the discovery of two rogue planets, OGLE-2012-BLG-1323 and OGLE-2017-BLG-0560.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

  • Bruce Dorminey goes into detail about how the ESA’s Gaia space telescope discovered the vast, dim, Antlia 2 dwarf galaxy just outside of the Milky Way.
  • At the Everyday Sociology Blog, Colby King undertakes a sociological examination of the issues of the American circus.
  • At The Finger Post, David Finger remembers a 2004 visit to the Bosnian city of Mostar, symbolized by the destruction of the Stari Most, the old bridge, linking the two halves of the divided city.
  • The Frailest Thing’s L.M. Sacasas takes issue with Marie Kondo’s minimalism, her engineering of the physical environment through decluttering to create joy.
  • JSTOR Daily notes how Soviet cosmonaut Valentina Tereshkova, a spacefaring woman, challenges contemporary American sexism.
  • Language Hat notes the Japanese manga Heterogenia Linguistico, about linguists trying to understand the languages of non-humans.
  • Erik Loomis at Lawyers, Guns and Money shares the argument of Mike Davis that Malibu, the home of wealthy people who built in an environmentally sensitive and dangerous area, should be left to burn.
  • Lingua Franca looks at the unexpected complexities and subtleties of language involved in getting a hunting license in Montana.
  • Danny Lyon at the NYR Daily, visiting a New Mexico forest seven years after a devastating fire, notes how it takes generations for these environments to recover.
  • Jason Davis at the Planetary Society Blog notes how the arrival of the Orion service module has been made amidst speculation that the commercial model for the Orion is not working.
  • Roads and Kingdoms reports on an excellent Japanese bakery in Phnom Penh.
  • Strange Company describes the life and career of Carol Crane.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how Chuchotka and Kamchatka, remote Russian Far Eastern territories, are in many respects akin to islands.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • Crux takes a look at some of the lost moons of the early solar system, including those of Jupiter, Saturn inward of Titan, and Neptune before its encounter with Triton.
  • D-Brief notes that, in its relatively warm and watery youth, the Moon could conceivably have supported life.
  • Dangerous Minds shares photos, and a precise, of the ball–the Diner de Têtes Surrealistes–thrown in 1972 by the Baroness Marie-Hélène de Rothschild and her husband Guy at the Château de Ferrières outside of Paris.
  • Jonathan Wynn at the Everyday Sociology Blog takes a look at how students’ race can complicate the act of studying abroad. http://www.everydaysociologyblog.com/2018/07/race-and-studying-abroad.html
  • Imageo notes the heat wave aggravating forest fires in California and Oregon.
  • JSTOR Daily considers if, perhaps, the Ford Pinto received an undeservedly negative reputation from its contemporaries.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money links to a Matthew Yglesias analysis about the usability of swing voters in the American context.
  • At the LRB Blog, Anne Orford draws from the Trump-Putin summit in Helsinki the argument that international politics is much too important to be decided by two men alone and their translators.
  • The Map Room Blog shares some remarkable infrared images of Titan, looking beneath that world’s clouds.
  • Marginal Revolution notes one report suggesting that oil revenues could lead to a tripling of the size of the GDP of Guyana in five years.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel illustrates the discovery of an ancient galaxy almost entirely absorbed into the Andromeda Galaxy, M32p.
  • Towleroad reviews the new Broadway play Straight White Men, which has an interesting take on this hitherto-dominant portion of North American society.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait shares photos of rings around a distant galaxy’s central black hole.
  • Inspired by Finland’s Olympic team, the Toronto Public Library’s The Buzz shares some interesting books on knitting and for knitters.
  • Centauri Dreams notes the surprising news that the Milky Way and Andromeda galaxies actually have the same mass. This changes everything about what was thought about the future of the Local Group. D-Brief also reports on this news.
  • JSTOR Daily notes how the conversion of tobacco fields into solar farms is not just potentially life-saving but economically viable, too.
  • Language Hat rounds up links relevant to the discovery, by field linguists, of the Malaysian language of Jedek.
  • Lingua Franca, at the Chronicle of Higher Education, shares a story from Lucy Ferris of Paris of old and the bookstore Shakespeare and Company.
  • The LRB Blog notes that the privatization of military officers’ housing in the United Kingdom was another disaster.
  • Marginal Revolution considers if Los Angeles is the most right-wing major American city, and what that actually means.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer notes that, even in the face of subsidence in Groningen around gas fields and cheap wind energy, even the Netherlands is not moving away from oil and gas.
  • Drew Rowsome reports on porn star/actor Chris Harder and his new show, Porn To Be A Star. (NSFW.)
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel examines the factors which distinguish a good scientific theory from a bad one.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy makes a decent argument that the politicized pop culture fandom around supreme court judge Ruth Bader Ginsberg is not good for the future of jurisprudence.
  • John Scalzi, at Whatever, reviews the new Pixel Buds from Google.