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Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘los angeles

[BLOG] Some Friday links

(A day late, I know; I crashed after work yesterday.)

  • Antipope’s Charlie Stross has a thought experiment: If you were superwealthy and guaranteed to live a long health life, how would you try to deal with the consequence of economic inequality?
  • Vikas Charma at Architectuul takes a look at the different factors that go into height in buildings.
  • Bad Astronomy notes S5-HVS1, a star flung out of the Milky Way Galaxy by Sagittarius A* at 1755 kilometres per second.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly shares photos from two Manhattan walks of hers, taken in non-famous areas.
  • Centauri Dreams looks at habitability for red dwarf exoplanets. Stellar activity matters.
  • Maria Farrell at Crooked Timber shares words from a manifesto about data protection in the EU.
  • Dangerous Minds shares photos from Los Angeles punks and mods and others in the 1980s.
  • Bruce Dorminey notes a ESA report suggesting crew hibernation could make trips to Mars easier.
  • Gizmodo notes that the Hayabusa2 probe of Japan is returning from asteroid Ryugu with a sample.
  • Imageo shares photos of the disastrous fires in Australia from space.
  • Information is Beautiful reports on winners of the Information is Beautiful Awards for 2019, for good infographics.
  • JSTOR Daily explains how local television stations made the ironic viewing of bad movies a thing.
  • Kotaku reports on the last days of Kawasaki Warehouse, an arcade in Japan patterned on the demolished Walled City of Kowloon.
  • Language Hat notes how translation mistakes led to the star Beta Cygni gaining the Arabic name Albireo.
  • Language Log reports on a unique Cantonese name of a restaurant in Hong Kong.
  • Robert Farley at Lawyers, Guns and Money links to an analysis of his suggesting the military of India is increasingly hard-pressed to counterbalance China.
  • The LRB Blog notes the catastrophe of Venice.
  • Marginal Revolution notes a paper suggesting states would do well not to place their capitals too far away from major population centres.
  • Justin Petrone at North! remarks on a set of old apple preserves.
  • The NYR Daily looks at how the west and the east of the European Union are divided by different conceptions of national identity.
  • Jim Belshaw at Personal Reflections reports from his town of Armidale as the smoke from the Australian wildfires surrounds all. The photos are shocking.
  • Emily Lakdawalla at the Planetary Society Blog lists some books about space suitable for children.
  • Drew Rowsome reviews the Canadian film music Stand!, inspired by the 1919 Winnipeg General Strike.
  • The Russian Demographics Blog shares a paper noting that, in Switzerland, parenthood does not make people happy.
  • The Signal notes that 1.7 million phone book pages have been scanned into the records of the Library of Congress.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel explains the concept of multi-messenger astronomy and why it points the way forward for studies of astrophysics.
  • Strange Maps looks at how a majority of students in the United States attend diverse schools, and where.
  • Strange Company explores the mysterious death of Marc-Antoine Calas, whose death triggered the persecution of Huguenots and resulted in the mobilization of Enlightenment figures like Voltaire against the state. What happened?
  • Towleroad hosts a critical, perhaps disappointed, review of the major gay play The Inheritance.
  • Understanding Society’s Daniel Little looks at the power of individual people in political hierarchies.
  • Window on Eurasia shares an opinion piece noting how many threats to the Russian language have come from its association with unpopular actions by Russia.
  • Arnold Zwicky explores queens as various as Elizabeth I and Adore Delano.

[URBAN NOTE] Five city links: New York City, Los Angeles, Paris, Venice, Istanbul

  • The OS/2 operating system is used in New York City to run that metropolis subway system. VICE reports.
  • The problem of homelessness in Los Angeles, the Guardian reports, is shocking.
  • CityLab reports on plans for new sorts of urban forests outside famous landmarks in Paris.
  • DW reports on how people in Venice protest against the intrusions of huge cruise ships into their lagoon, threatening the delicate environment.
  • Guardian Cities reports on how the hipster class in Istanbul has begun to migrate to the countryside, driven out of their city by real estate prices and by politics.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

  • Bad Astronomy shares Hubble images of asteroid 6478 Gault, seemingly in the process of dissolving.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly writes about the experience of living in a body one knows from hard experience to be fallible.
  • Gizmodo notes new evidence that environmental stresses pushed at least some Neanderthals to engage in cannibalism.
  • Hornet Stories notes the 1967 raid by Los Angeles police against the Black Cat nightclub, a pre-Stonewall trigger of LGBTQ organization.
  • Imageo notes the imperfect deal wrought by Colorado Basin states to minimize the pain felt by drought in that river basin.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at the cinema of Claire Denis.
  • Language Log reports on the work of linguist Ghil’ad Zuckermann, a man involved in language revival efforts in Australia after work in Israel with Hebrew.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money wonders if the Iran-Contra scandal will be a precedent for the Mueller report, with the allegations being buried by studied inattention.
  • Marginal Revolution makes a case for NIMBYism leading to street urination.
  • Justin Petrone at North! looks at a theatrical performance of a modern Estonian literary classic, and what it says about gender and national identity.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw makes the case for a treaty with Australian Aborigines, to try to settle settler-indigenous relations in Australia.
  • John Quiggin looks at the factors leading to the extinction of coal as an energy source in the United Kingdom.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes that we are not yet up to the point of being able to detect exomoons of Earth-like planets comparable to our Moon.
  • Window on Eurasia notes the occasion of the last singer in the Ket language.
  • Arnold Zwicky shares some cartoon humour, around thought balloons.

[URBAN NOTE] Five city links: Hamilton, Kingston, Montréal, Halifax, Los Angeles

  • CBC Hamilton reports on an exciting experiment: For one year, as part of a test holders of Hamilton library cards will enjoy free access to the city’s museums.
  • The City of Kingston is apparently seeking to rebrand itself. (How, I wonder, is it currently perceived?) Global News reports.
  • The National Observer reports on the effect that an influx of tech companies has had on the residents of the Garment District of Montréal.
  • Is there a pedestrian safety issue emerging in Halifax? CBC reports.
  • Laura Bliss at CityLab reports on why a new tax in Los Angeles aiming to encourage mass transit use has not had that effect.

[URBAN NOTE] Five city links: Detroit and Windsor, Calgary, Los Angeles, London, Russian cities

  • The controversy over a new bridge connecting American Detroit to Canadian Windsor continues, on and on. The National Post reports.
  • Jason Markusoff at MacLean’s notes the tenuous position of the tens of thousands of people who live in Calgary’s flood zones.
  • Wired notes how the city of Los Angeles will need to spend billions of dollars to protect itself against sea level rise.
  • The Guardian notes the shocking story of a mixed-income real estate development in London that excludes subsidized tenants from access to athletic facilities.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how, on the basis of current trends, relatively sizable Russian cities including Novokuznetsk, Ivanovo, and Norilsk might depopulate by the end of the 21st century.

[URBAN NOTE] Five city links: Vaughan and Markham, Hamilton, Los Angeles, Hong Kong, Bishkek

  • Noor Javed notes that, if belatedly, people actually have signed up to run as mayor in Markham in Vaughan. The Toronto Star has it.
  • Hamilton Mayor Fred Eisenberger strongly disagrees with Doug Ford’s reduction of the size of Toronto City Council, hoping this does not speak to a future deterioration of province-municipal relations generally. Global News reports.
  • CityLab notes that a Los Angeles subsidy to urban farmers has gone almost entirely unused.
  • Noise complaints, CityLab reports, have led to the closure of the pedestrian mall in Hong Kong’s Mong Kok neighbourhood.
  • Open Democracy reports on what sounds like an almost literally criminally planned program of chopping down much-needed urban tree coverage in the Kyrgyzstan capital of Bishkek.

[URBAN NOTE] Five city links: Charlotte, Baltimore, Wasaga Beach, Los Angeles, Hong Kong and Macau

  • Frank Jacobs at Strange Maps takes a look at the regularity, and otherwise, of different cities’ street grids.
  • CityLab notes how the city of Baltimore is suing Big Oil over the effects of climate change, including flooding.
  • The Lake Huron resort community of Wasaga Beach turns out to have strong connections with the Lithuanian-Canadian community.
  • CityLab takes a look at the love food critic Jonathan Gold expressed for the city of Los Angeles in his writing.
  • The SCMP notes that the British government in the 1980s was so opposed to Hong Kongers gaining the right to live in the UK that they tried to get Portugal to strip full citizenship from eligible Macanese.