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Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘louisiana

[BLOG] Some Friday links

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  • Architetuul considers the architectural potential offered by temporary constructions.
  • Centauri Dreams examines how the latest artificial intelligence routines were used to pick up the faint signal of Kepler-90i.
  • JSTOR Daily examines the sign language used by the deaf servants popular at the Ottoman imperial court.
  • Gizmodo notes that preliminary studies of ‘Oumuamua suggest that body is not a technological artifact.
  • Hornet Stories notes the bizarre friendship of Floyd Mayweather with Chechnya’s Ramzan Kadyrov.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes the negative effects of NAFTA and globalization on the food eaten by Mexicans.
  • Geoffrey Pullum at Lingua Franca notes the fine line between dialectal differences and language errors.
  • The LRB Blog takes a quick look at corruption in the Russian bid for the World Cup in 2018.
  • The NYR Daily looks at Russian influence behind the Brexit referendum, noting the long-term need of the American and British democracies to adapt.
  • Jake Shears talks with Towleroad about the role that the city of New Orleans has been playing in his life and his creative work.
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[BLOG] Some Saturday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait looks at enormous, explosive Wolf-Rayet stars, and at WR 124 in particular.
  • The Big Picture shares heart-rending photos of Rohingya refugees fleeing Burma.
  • Centauri Dreams considers the potential of near-future robotic asteroid mining.
  • D-Brief notes the discovery of vast cave systems on the Moon, potential homes for settlers.
  • Hornet Stories exposes young children to Madonna’s hit songs and videos of the 1980s. She still has it.
  • Inkfish notes that a beluga raised in captivity among dolphins has picked up elements of their speech.
  • Language Hat notes a dubious claim that a stelae containing Luwian hieroglyphic script, from ancient Anatolia, has been translated.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money considers the question of preserving brutalist buildings.
  • The LRB Blog considers how Brexit, intended to enhance British sovereignty and power, will weaken both.
  • The Map Room Blog notes that the moons and planets of the solar system have been added to Google Maps.
  • The NYR Daily considers how the Burmese government is carefully creating a case for Rohingya genocide.
  • The Power and Money’s Noel Maurer concludes, regretfully, that the market for suborbital travel is just not there.
  • Visiting a shrimp festival in Louisiana, Roads and Kingdoms considers how the fisheries work with the oil industry (or not).
  • Towleroad reports on the apparent abduction in Chechnya of singer Zelimkhan Bakayev, part of the anti-gay pogrom there.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that rebuilding Kaliningrad as a Russian military outpost will be expensive.

[NEWS] Some Tuesday links

  • The CBC notes the consensus that the new Ontario minimum wage will not hurt the economy, overall, but provide a mild boost.
  • The Toronto Star notes that, from 2019, analog television broadcasts will start ramping down.
  • The Toronto Star notes that high prices in Ontario’s cottage country are causing the market to expand to new areas.
  • Gizmodo reports on one study suggesting that Proxima Centauri b does have the potential to support Earth-like climates.
  • Gizmodo notes one study speculating on the size of Mars’ vanished oceans.
  • Quartz reports on how one community in Alaska and one community in Louisiana are facing serious pressures from climate change and from the political reaction to said.
  • CBC notes an oil platform leaving Newfoundland for the oceans.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • blogTO profiles Robert Burley’s lovely new photo book, An Enduring Wilderness: Toronto’s Natural Parklands.
  • Border Thinking’s Laura Agustín looks at the New Orleans sex trade in the fiction of James Lee Burke.
  • Crooked Timber argues that philosophy majors are uniquely well-suited to being good citizens.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money makes the point that American conservative voters are not monocausal.
  • Steve Munro notes that the TTC can count on delivering unreliable service, thanks in part to its concentration on terminals
  • The NYRB Daily looks at the fables of Syrian writer Osama Alomar.
  • Savage Minds looks at the very serious anthropology of Bronislaw Malinowski.
  • Whatever’s John Scalzi announces his upcoming participation in the Robots vs. Fairies anthology.
  • Window on Eurasia argues a Russian annexation of the Donbas would be doable only in the aftermath of a wider Russian war against Ukraine.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

  • blogTO notes that a Toronto family known for its Christmas lights display may be forced to ratchet back by city inspectors.
  • Centauri Dreams notes the apparent discovery of Kuiper Belt objects around white dwarf WD 1425+540.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to one paper examining the possible orbital inclination of Proxima Centauri b, and points to another one speculating about upper limits to the masses of other exoplanets orbiting P_roxima Centauri.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money links to interviews with different historians noting how close the United States is to a scenario from 1930s Germany.
  • The LRB Blog notes that the actions of the American deep state to undermine elements of the Trump Administration seen as potentially threatening will certainly also undermine American democracy.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw looks at reasons for the continuing gap in life outcomes between indigenous and non-indigenous Australians.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer links to a paper looking at the effect of Huey Long’s populism on Louisiana’s economy, noting that he had little effect on the markets. This suggests that counting on the markets to reign in populists before the crash may be a mistake.
  • Strange Maps links to a map and history of the Gagauz of Moldova.
  • Torontoist looks at the continuing decline of live music venues in Toronto.
  • Towleroad notes the origins of Der Spiegel‘s cover art showing Trump with the severed head of lady liberty in a Cuban exile’s work.
  • Window on Eurasia notes differences between how Russians and Americans think about ethnicity and citizenship in their diverse societies.

[LINK] “Louisiana History Washes Away As Sea Levels Rise, Land Sinks”

NPR’s Tegan Wendland reports on how rising sea levels, arguably felt more in low-lying Louisiana than elsewhere, are contributing to the literal erosion of the state’s history.

Louisiana is losing its coast at a rapid rate because of rising sea levels, development and sinking marshland. Officials are trying to rebuild those marshes and the wetlands, but much of the coast can’t be saved. This makes Louisiana’s history an unwitting victim. As land disappears and the water creeps inland, ancient archaeology sites are washing away, too.

Richie Blink was born and raised in Plaquemines Parish, La. — way down south of New Orleans along the Mississippi River. Now he works for the National Wildlife Federation.

[. . .]

What’s locally known as the “Lemon Trees” is a stand of weathered old trees on a grassy tuft of land. It’s a well-known landmark for fishermen, but Blink says they would rarely stop there to hunt or fish because it’s a sacred Native American site.

“The legend goes that you were always to bring some kind of sacrifice, so somebody left some lemons for the ancestors,” Blink says.

And those grew into big trees with grapefruit-sized lemons. But as land was lost to the Gulf of Mexico, saltwater made its way into the freshwater marsh, killing off the trees and other plants.

The trees stand like skeletons on the edge of this scrappy, wind-beaten island. Waves beat against the dirt, washing it away, exposing shards of ancient pottery.

Written by Randy McDonald

January 4, 2017 at 3:30 pm

[BLOG] Some Monday links

  • Beyond the Beyond notes how astronomers are now collecting dust from space in their gutters, without needing to go to Antarctica.
  • blogTO notes the many lost dairies of mid-20th century Toronto.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze looks at how volatiles freeze out in protoplanetary disks.
  • The Dragon’s Tales links to a paper considering the exploration of ocean worlds.
  • Far Outliers links to a report of a Cossack mercenary working in North America for the British in the War of American Independence.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money considers the grave and the life of Homer Plessy.
  • Steve Munro looks at some possibly worrisome service changes for the TTC.
  • pollotenchegg notes trends in urbanization in post-1970 Ukraine.
  • Strange Maps looks at a scone map of the British Isles.