A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘louisiana

[NEWS] Some Tuesday links

  • The CBC notes the consensus that the new Ontario minimum wage will not hurt the economy, overall, but provide a mild boost.
  • The Toronto Star notes that, from 2019, analog television broadcasts will start ramping down.
  • The Toronto Star notes that high prices in Ontario’s cottage country are causing the market to expand to new areas.
  • Gizmodo reports on one study suggesting that Proxima Centauri b does have the potential to support Earth-like climates.
  • Gizmodo notes one study speculating on the size of Mars’ vanished oceans.
  • Quartz reports on how one community in Alaska and one community in Louisiana are facing serious pressures from climate change and from the political reaction to said.
  • CBC notes an oil platform leaving Newfoundland for the oceans.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • blogTO profiles Robert Burley’s lovely new photo book, An Enduring Wilderness: Toronto’s Natural Parklands.
  • Border Thinking’s Laura Agustín looks at the New Orleans sex trade in the fiction of James Lee Burke.
  • Crooked Timber argues that philosophy majors are uniquely well-suited to being good citizens.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money makes the point that American conservative voters are not monocausal.
  • Steve Munro notes that the TTC can count on delivering unreliable service, thanks in part to its concentration on terminals
  • The NYRB Daily looks at the fables of Syrian writer Osama Alomar.
  • Savage Minds looks at the very serious anthropology of Bronislaw Malinowski.
  • Whatever’s John Scalzi announces his upcoming participation in the Robots vs. Fairies anthology.
  • Window on Eurasia argues a Russian annexation of the Donbas would be doable only in the aftermath of a wider Russian war against Ukraine.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

  • blogTO notes that a Toronto family known for its Christmas lights display may be forced to ratchet back by city inspectors.
  • Centauri Dreams notes the apparent discovery of Kuiper Belt objects around white dwarf WD 1425+540.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to one paper examining the possible orbital inclination of Proxima Centauri b, and points to another one speculating about upper limits to the masses of other exoplanets orbiting P_roxima Centauri.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money links to interviews with different historians noting how close the United States is to a scenario from 1930s Germany.
  • The LRB Blog notes that the actions of the American deep state to undermine elements of the Trump Administration seen as potentially threatening will certainly also undermine American democracy.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw looks at reasons for the continuing gap in life outcomes between indigenous and non-indigenous Australians.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer links to a paper looking at the effect of Huey Long’s populism on Louisiana’s economy, noting that he had little effect on the markets. This suggests that counting on the markets to reign in populists before the crash may be a mistake.
  • Strange Maps links to a map and history of the Gagauz of Moldova.
  • Torontoist looks at the continuing decline of live music venues in Toronto.
  • Towleroad notes the origins of Der Spiegel‘s cover art showing Trump with the severed head of lady liberty in a Cuban exile’s work.
  • Window on Eurasia notes differences between how Russians and Americans think about ethnicity and citizenship in their diverse societies.

[LINK] “Louisiana History Washes Away As Sea Levels Rise, Land Sinks”

NPR’s Tegan Wendland reports on how rising sea levels, arguably felt more in low-lying Louisiana than elsewhere, are contributing to the literal erosion of the state’s history.

Louisiana is losing its coast at a rapid rate because of rising sea levels, development and sinking marshland. Officials are trying to rebuild those marshes and the wetlands, but much of the coast can’t be saved. This makes Louisiana’s history an unwitting victim. As land disappears and the water creeps inland, ancient archaeology sites are washing away, too.

Richie Blink was born and raised in Plaquemines Parish, La. — way down south of New Orleans along the Mississippi River. Now he works for the National Wildlife Federation.

[. . .]

What’s locally known as the “Lemon Trees” is a stand of weathered old trees on a grassy tuft of land. It’s a well-known landmark for fishermen, but Blink says they would rarely stop there to hunt or fish because it’s a sacred Native American site.

“The legend goes that you were always to bring some kind of sacrifice, so somebody left some lemons for the ancestors,” Blink says.

And those grew into big trees with grapefruit-sized lemons. But as land was lost to the Gulf of Mexico, saltwater made its way into the freshwater marsh, killing off the trees and other plants.

The trees stand like skeletons on the edge of this scrappy, wind-beaten island. Waves beat against the dirt, washing it away, exposing shards of ancient pottery.

Written by Randy McDonald

January 4, 2017 at 3:30 pm

[BLOG] Some Monday links

  • Beyond the Beyond notes how astronomers are now collecting dust from space in their gutters, without needing to go to Antarctica.
  • blogTO notes the many lost dairies of mid-20th century Toronto.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze looks at how volatiles freeze out in protoplanetary disks.
  • The Dragon’s Tales links to a paper considering the exploration of ocean worlds.
  • Far Outliers links to a report of a Cossack mercenary working in North America for the British in the War of American Independence.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money considers the grave and the life of Homer Plessy.
  • Steve Munro looks at some possibly worrisome service changes for the TTC.
  • pollotenchegg notes trends in urbanization in post-1970 Ukraine.
  • Strange Maps looks at a scone map of the British Isles.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

  • Anthropology.net notes that schizophrenia is not an inheritance from the Neanderthals.
  • D-Brief notes a recent study of nova V1213 Cen that drew on years of observation.
  • Dangerous Minds shares a Simple Minds show from 1979.
  • The Everyday Sociology Blog argues in favour of educating people about how they consume.
  • Far Outliers notes the mid-12th century Puebloan diaspora and the arrival of the Navajo.
  • Marginal Revolution’s Tyler Cowen reports on the Faroe Islands.
  • The Planetary Society Blog notes the impending launch of the OSIRIS-REx probe.
  • Spacing Toronto examines through an interview the idea of artivism.
  • Strange Maps notes the need to update the map of Louisiana.
  • Torontoist introduces its new daily newsletters.
  • Understanding Society examines liberalism’s relationship with hate-based extremism.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that Russians are concerned about their country’s post-Ukraine isolation but not enough to do anything about it, and looks at the generation gap across the former Soviet space.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

  • blogTO notes this weekend is going to be warm.
  • Centauri Dreams looks at moons of the dwarf planets in the Kuiper belt.
  • Dangerous Minds looks at some photos of American malls taken in the late 1980s.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze notes a white dwarf that stole so much matter from its stellar partner to make it a brown dwarf.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes Greenland may not have been particularly warm when the Vikings came.
  • Language Hat tells the story of one solitary person who decided to learn Korean.
  • Language Log writes about Sinitic languages written in phonetic scripts.
  • The Map Room Blog shares a map showing how New Orleans is sinking.
  • Marginal Revolution suggests Brexit is not a good strategy, even in the hypothetical case of a collapsing EU. Why not just wait for the collapse?
  • The New APPS Blog notes with concern the expansion of Elsevier.
  • The NYRB Daily notes the perennial divisions among the Kurds.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer wonders what’s wrong with Bernie Sanders.
  • Towleroad looks at the impending decriminalization of gay sex in the Seychelles.
  • Understanding Society looks at the work of Brankovich in understanding global inequality.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that Crimean Tatars are no longer alone in remembering 1944, and looks at the unhappiness of Tuva’s shrinking Russophone minority.