A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘malta

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes that methane hydrates on the ocean floor will only pose a catastrophic risk of climate change if we do nothing about climate change generally.
  • Centauri Dreams reports on the massive flare detected on L-dwarf ULAS J224940.13-011236.9.
  • Crooked Timber considers a philosophical conundrum: What should individuals do to combat climate change? What are they responsible for?
  • The Crux considers a few solar system locations that future generations of hikers might well want to explore on foot.
  • Joe. My. God. notes that Pete Buttigieg is becoming a big star in his father’s homeland of Malta.
  • Language Log considers the idea of learning Cantonese as a second language.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money considers the policy innovations of Elizabeth Warren.
  • The Map Room Blog looks at how the Russian government is apparently spoofing GPS signals.
  • Marginal Revolution reports a claim by Peter Thiel that the institutionalization of science since the Manhattan Project is slowing down technological advances. Is this plausible?
  • Emily Lakdawalla at the Planetary Society Blog notes that the Mars InSight probe has detected marsquakes.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes that, finally, astronomers have found the first cold gas giants among the exoplanets, worlds in wide orbits like Jupiter and Saturn.
  • Ilya Somin at the Volokh Conspiracy notes how some of the praise for Daenerys Targaryen by Elizabeth Warren reveals interesting and worrisome blind spots. (Myself, I fear a “Dark Dany” scenario.)
  • Window on Eurasia suggests that Russia is not over the fact that Ukraine is moving on.
  • Frances Woolley at the Worthwhile Canadian Initiative takes issue with the argument of Andray Domise after an EKOS poll, that Canadians would not know much about the nature of migration flows.
  • For Easter, Arnold Zwicky considered red and white flowers, bearing the colours of the season.

[DM] Some links: longevity, real estate, migrations, the future (#demographymatters, #demographics, #population)

I have a links post up at Demography Matters.

  • Old age popped up as a topic in my feed. The Crux considered when human societies began to accumulate large numbers of aged people. Would there have been octogenarians in any Stone Age cultures, for instance? Information is Beautiful, meanwhile, shares an informative infographic analyzing the factors that go into extending one’s life expectancy.
  • Growing populations in cities, and real estate markets hostile even to established residents, are a concern of mine in Toronto. They are shared globally: The Malta Independent examined some months ago how strong growth in the labour supply and tourism, along with capital inflows, have driven up property prices in Malta. Marginal Revolution noted there are conflicts between NIMBYism, between opposing development in established neighbourhoods, and supporting open immigration policies.
  • Ethnic migrations also appeared. The Cape Breton Post shared a fascinating report about the history of the Jewish community of industrial Cape Breton, in Nova Scotia, while the Guardian of Charlottetown reports the reunification of a family of Syrian refugees on Prince Edward Island. In Eurasia, meanwhile, Window on Eurasia noted the growth of the Volga Tatar population of Moscow, something hidden by the high degree of assimilation of many of its members.
  • Looking towards the future, Marginal Revolution’s Tyler Cowen was critical of the idea of limiting the number of children one has in a time of climate change. On a related theme, his co-blogger Alex Tabarrok highlights a new paper aiming to predict the future, one that argues that the greatest economic gains will eventually accrue to the densest populations. Established high-income regions, it warns, could lose out if they keep out migrants.

[ISL] Five #islands links: Wolfe Island, Cape Breton, Sable Island, Mayreau, Malta

  • The people of Wolfe Island are upset at cutbacks in ferry trips to and from their island. Global News reports.
  • The Cape Breton Post shares a fascinating report about the history of the Jewish community of industrial Cape Breton.
  • Sable Island, in the Atlantic off of the Nova Scotia coast, is going to enjoy a clean-up. Global News reports.
  • The Inter Press Service notes how global warming-accelerated erosion threatens to split the Caribbean island of Mayreau into two.
  • The Malta Independent examined some months ago how strong growth in the labour supply and tourism, along with capital inflows, have driven up property prices in Malta.

[ISL] Five island links: Northern Ireland, Malta, Mallorca, Nauru, Jeju

  • Tory MEP Charles Tannock notes how Brexiteers’ disregards for the special interests of Northern Ireland threaten to un-do the United Kingdom. He writes in the New Statesman.
  • Can Malta become a world centre for blockchain production? CBB reports.
  • Anti-tourism protests in the Balearic island of Mallorca are gaining strength. Condé Nast reports
  • The conditions facing refugees detained by the Australian government on the island of Nauru are horrific. The Guardian reports.
  • Yemeni refugees residing on the South Korean island of Jeju, known for its tourist industry, are encountering mixed reactions. The South China Morning Post reports.

[ISL] Five islands links: Malta, East Timor, Choctaw, Ireland, April Fool’s Day

  • Malta, it seems from this New Statesman take, is facing serious problems of corruption through its role in international finance.
  • The establishment of a new maritime border between Australia and East Timor threatens Australia’s borders with adjacent Indonesia. ABC reports.
  • Ireland has established a scholarship program for Choctaw students as a sign of thanks for Choctaw aid during the Irish Potato Famine. The Irish Post reports.
  • This Slugger O’Toole article suggests that the disparity in living standards and income between the Republic and Northern Ireland is not nearly so vast as GDP would suggest.
  • The Map Room Blog shared this Ordinance Survey’s April Fool’s Day joke, of a fake but realistic island.

[ISL] Five islands links: Malta/Pantelleria, American Samoa, Chatham Islands, Tasmania, Newfoundland

  • The suggestion of Maltese academic Godfrey Baldacchino that Malta relieve its overcrowding by buying the nearby Italian island of Pantelleria has the advantage of being attention-catching. Malta Today has it.
  • I wish the lawsuit of American Samoans seeking full citizenship in the United States all possible success. NBC News reports.
  • Atlas Obscura takes a look at the distinctive history and culture of the Moriori of the Chatham Islands.
  • Tasmania turns out to be a hugely popular destination for tourists from China. Bloomberg reports.
  • The Newfoundland government’s program of relocating marginal settlements remains hugely controversial. CBC reports.

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

  • Anthropology.net shares in the debunking of the Toba catastrophe theory.
  • Architectuul features Mirena Dunu’s exploration of the architecture of the Black Sea coastal resorts of Romania, built under Communism.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly writes about the importance of sleep hygiene and of being well-rested.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes the filaments of Orion, indicators of starbirth.
  • Centauri Dreams notes how solar sails and the Falcon Heavy can be used to expedite the exploration of the solar system.
  • D-Brief notes the discovery of debris marking the massive flood that most recently refilled the Mediterranean on the seafloor near Malta.
  • Lucy Ferriss at Lingua Franca uses a recent sickbed experience in Paris to explore the genesis of Bemelmans’ Madeline.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money noted recently the 15th anniversary of the American invasion of Iraq, trigger of a world-historical catastrophe.
  • The LRB Blog hosts Sara Roy’s defense of UNRWA and of the definition of the Palestinians under its case as refugees.
  • The NYR Daily notes how the regnant conservative government in Israel has been limiting funding to cultural creators who dissent from the nationalist line.
  • Roads and Kingdoms uses seven food dishes to explore the history of Malta.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel explains why, even though dark matter is likely present in our solar system, we have not detected signs of it.
  • Daniel Little at Understanding Society examines the field of machine learning, and notes the ways in which its basic epistemology might be flawed.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how the dropping of the ethnonym “Mongol” from the title of the former Buryat-Mongol autonomous republic sixty years ago still makes some Buryats unhappy.

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

  • Crooked Timber takes a quick look at the role of the shadow in art, here.
  • Daily JSTOR notes that, in the 18th century, the punch favoured by partiers was often put up against the tea favoured by the more civilized.
  • Language Hat notes that the British Library has preserved the only surviving copy of Il Kaulata Maltia, the first Maltese-language journal.
  • Marginal Revolution notes a new study examining if easier divorce leads to assortative mating.
  • Justin Petrone at north! celebrates his life in November in Estonia.
  • Rocky Planet notes that Indonesia’s Mount Agung is experiencing volcanic eruptions of lava.
  • Window on Eurasia suggests that Putin’s Russia is trying to get Ukraine to take over Donbas on disadvantageous terms.

[NEWS] Five links on infrastructure, from Toronto parks and climate change to nuclear energy

  • Nikhil Sharma at Torontoist looks at the latest City of Toronto TransformTO report on adapting to climate change.
  • The Toronto Star Fatima Syed looks at how community organizations in Toronto are getting involved in running local parks.
  • Politico.eu notes how Malta, despite having plenty of sun, is having difficulty getting solar energy (and other alternative energy) up and running.
  • The Inter Press Service examines the potential complexities involved in China’s involvement in Argentina’s nuclear energy program.
  • VICE reports on the desperate need to get Ojibwa consent before building a nuclear waste disposal site on their traditional lands.

[LINK] “Lloyds of London are leaving London”

New Europe’s Andy King reports on how iconic British insurance firm Lloyd’s of London, in an effort to ensure that it can offer continuity of services to its European Union clients post-Brexit, has begun to shift jobs out of London to EU destinations. Ireland and Malta are apparently fronrunners.

After three centuries, the Lloyds of London will no longer be “of London.” The company is moving its headquarters, its CEO Inga Beale confirmed on Friday.

Talking to Bloomberg TV on the sidelines of the World Economic Forum in Davos, Beale confirmed that following Prime Minister May’s announcement last Tuesday, Lloyds was going ahead with its contingency plan.

Many insurance companies will be moving a big part of their operations, since passporting rights and licensing are key to the sectors’ business in Europe. Lloyds stands to lose as much as 11% of its premiums that come from Europe or little under 1bn Euros.

Lloyd’s was founded three centuries ago in London and is moving ahead because a licensing process could take more than a year. What Lloyd’s want to avoid is what the industry calls “cliff’s edge trap,” in which the service provider cannot move soon enough to ensure continuity of service.

Written by Randy McDonald

January 23, 2017 at 8:15 pm