A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘maps

[ISL] Five islands links: Malta, East Timor, Choctaw, Ireland, April Fool’s Day

leave a comment »

  • Malta, it seems from this New Statesman take, is facing serious problems of corruption through its role in international finance.
  • The establishment of a new maritime border between Australia and East Timor threatens Australia’s borders with adjacent Indonesia. ABC reports.
  • Ireland has established a scholarship program for Choctaw students as a sign of thanks for Choctaw aid during the Irish Potato Famine. The Irish Post reports.
  • This Slugger O’Toole article suggests that the disparity in living standards and income between the Republic and Northern Ireland is not nearly so vast as GDP would suggest.
  • The Map Room Blog shared this Ordinance Survey’s April Fool’s Day joke, of a fake but realistic island.
Advertisements

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

leave a comment »

  • Centauri Dreams shares a cool design for a mid-21st century Triton landing mission.
  • Crooked Timber argues American conservative intellectuals have descended to hackwork.
  • D-Brief notes the surprisingly important role that eyebrows may have played in human evolution.
  • Dead Things notes how a hominid fossil discovery in the Arabian desert suggests human migration to Africa occurred almost 90 thousand years ago, longer than previously believed.
  • Hornet Stories notes that biphobia in the LGBTQ community is one factor discouraging bisexuals from coming out.
  • At In Media Res, Russell Arben Fox gives a favourable review to Wendell Berry’s latest, The Art of Loading Brush.
  • JSTOR Daily explores the connections between Roman civilization and poisoning as a means for murder.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes how the early 20th century American practice of redlining, denying minorities access to good housing, still marks the maps of American cities.
  • The LRB Blog notes how the 1948 assassination of reformer Gaitan in Bogota changed Colombia and Latin America, touching the lives of Gabriel Garcia Marquez and Fidel Castro.
  • The Map Room Blog notes that Spacing has launched a new contest, encouraging creators of inventive maps of Canadian cities to do their work.
  • The NYR Daily notes a new exhibit of Victorian art that explores its various mirrored influences, backwards and forwards.
  • At the Planetary Society Blog, Jason Davis explores TESS, the next generation of planet-hunting astronomy satellite from NASA.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel shares photos of planetary formation around sun-like star TW Hydrae.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that a combination of urbanization, Russian government policy, and the influence of pop culture is killing off minority languages in Russia.

[NEWS] Five LGBTQ links: All in the Family, hair salon, Northern Ireland, tourism, John Constantine

leave a comment »

  • Hornet Stories notes how All in the Family was path-breaking with its depiction of a gay character on TV back in 1971, here.
  • Making more LGBTQ-friendly hair salons is a worthy goal. The Globe and Mail reports.
  • Northern Ireland may yet achieve marriage equality in the near future. Hornet Stories reports.
  • Strange Maps’ Frank Jacobs shares this useful map depicting which countries are, and are not, safe for LGBTQ tourists, here.
  • The representation of out bisexual DC character John Constantine on Legends of Tomorrow is interesting, and hopeful. The Atlantic looks at this.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

leave a comment »

  • Anthropology.net’s Kambiz Kamrani looks at the classical Mayan trade in pets, dogs and cats particularly.
  • Dangerous Minds shares some vintage cheesecake ads for video and arcade games from 1980s Japan.
  • Dead Things considers an examination of the thesis that the fabulous horns of some dinosaurs were used as sexual signals.
  • Hornet Stories nominates some queer people to get stars on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.
  • JSTOR Daily tells the story of Bobbi Gibb, the woman who in 1966 crashed the Boston Marathon.
  • Language Hattells of Toty Samed, an Angolan musician who writes songs not in the now-dominant Portuguese but in his ancestral Kimbundu.
  • Steven Attewell at Lawyers, Guns and Money considers the ways in which the metaphor of mutants has been used by Marvel Comics to explore themes of racism and marginalization.
  • At the LRB Blog, Matthew Porges notes how European Union opposition to the annexation of Western Sahara by Morocco is counterbalanced by the need to keep Morocco as a partner.
  • r/mapporn shared a beautiful map of the Great Lakes, Nayanno-Nibiimaang Gichigamiin or “The Five Freshwater Seas”, from the Ojibwe perspective.
  • The Map Room Blog shares Christian Tate’s transit-style map of Middle Earth.
  • Marginal Revolution links to an essay arguing against the United States’ dropping the penny and the nickel, on the grounds that these expensive coins are loss-leaders for currency generally.
  • The NYR Daily takes a look at early 20th century Russian philosopher Ivan Ilyan, a man whose influence is visible in the Putin era.
  • Drew Rowsome takes a look at the eye-catching male photography of Ekaterina Zakharova.
  • David Post’s analysis at the Volokh Conspiracy of the contract between Stormy Daniels and Donald Trump is a must-read.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how the Russian government has failed to cultivate soft power, or wider influence, in the West.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

  • At Anthrodendum, Elizabeth Marino takes issue with what she identifies as the naively and fiercely neoliberal elements of Steven Pinker’s Enlightenment Now.
  • Anthropology.net’s Kambiz Kamrani takes a look at an innovative study of the Surinamese creole of Sranan Tongo that uncovers that language’s linguistic origins in remarkably fine detail.
  • Architectuul examines the architecture of Communist-era Hungarian architect István Szábo
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes the nearly naked black hole at the heart of galaxy ZwCl 8193, 2.2 billion light-years away.
  • The Big Picture shares photos from the 2018 Paralympics in South Korea.
  • Gerry Canavan has an interesting critical take on Star Trek: Discovery. Is it really doing new things, or is its newness just superficial?
  • Centauri Dreams considers the impact the spectra of red dwarfs would have on biosignatures from their worlds.
  • Russell Darnley takes a look at Australia’s Darling River, a critical watercourse threatened by extensive water withdrawals.
  • Inkfish notes that patterns of wear on the tusks of elephants indicate most are right-handed.
  • Joe. My. God. links to a study suggesting a relationship between Trump rallies and violent assaults.
  • JSTOR Daily links to a paper examining why people drink Guinness on St. Patrick’s Day.
  • Language Hat takes a look at the use of Xhosa as the language of Wakanda.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money mourns Alfred Crosby, the historian whose work examined the epidemiological and ecological changes wrought by contact with the Americas.
  • The Map Room Blog links to a map showing indigenous placenames in Canada.
  • In the aftermath of the death of Stephen Hawking, Out There had a lovely idea: what nearby major stars emitted life than arrive at the moment of his birth? Hawking’s star is Regulus, and mine was (nearly) Arcturus.
  • Marginal Revolution suggests AI will never be able to centrally plan an economy because the complexity of the economy will always escape it.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel examines Stephen Hawking’s contribution to the study of black holes.
  • Supernova Condensate shares a list of moons, fictional and otherwise, from Endor on down.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

  • At Anthropology.net, Kambiz Kamrani notes the Qesem caves of Israel, where four hundred thousand years ago hominids learned to make tools.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes that star S2 is about to plunge to its closest approach to Sagittarius A*, the black hole at the heart of our galaxy, and what this means for science.
  • Centauri Dreams takes a look at research done on Earth about the atmospheres of super-Earths.
  • D-Brief takes a look at the recent research done on the regions on the edges of supermassive black holes.
  • Bruce Dorminey notes that the Juno science team thinks that Jupiter probe has exceeded expectations.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes the evidence for a massive migration from the steppes into Europe circa 3300 BCE.
  • The Frailest Thing’s Michael Sacasas makes the argument that the idea of humane technology is something of an oxymoron.
  • Imageo notes evidence that permafrost will melt more quickly than previous predicted under the impact of global warming.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at explanations for the unusually strong activism among high school students in East Los Angeles in the 1960s.
  • Language Hat looks at evidence for the close relationship, in vocabulary and even in grammar, between the Turkish and Western Armenian languages now separated by bad blood.
  • Lingua Franca notes how easy it is to change conventions on language use–like pronouns, say–at a well-functioning institution.
  • Marginal Revolution looks at the economic progress made, after a recent lull, by Ghana.
  • The NYR Daily looks at the growing involvement of the United States in small wars in Africa, starting with Niger and Cameroon.
  • Justin Petrone at north! reports on a family visit to his ancestral home of Bari, seeing what little remains of the past there.
  • Peter Rukavina wonders, apropos of a very successful experience shopping online at Amazon, how anyone else will be able to compete.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel considers the difference between mathematics and physics. Where is the line to be drawn?
  • Strange Maps’ Frank Jacobs maps obesity in the United States and in Europe.
  • Towleroad reports on the apparent interest of actor Cynthia Nixon in becoming governor of New York.
  • John Scalzi at Whatever is a big fan of A Wrinkle in Time, a movie that is not perfect but is still quite good. I’m curious to see it myself.
  • Window on Eurasia reports on food riots in isolated Turkmenistan.

[PHOTO] “Yonge & Eglinton Pedestrian Routes”

This is how we will have to cross the street for the foreseeable future as Eglinton Crosstown construction proceeds.

"Yonge & Eglinton Pedestrian Routes" #toronto #yongeandeglinton #maps #eglintoncrosstown #yongestreet #eglintonavenue #construction #latergram

Written by Randy McDonald

March 7, 2018 at 11:00 am