A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘marriage

[BLOG] Some Friday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait looks at the newly-named Neptune moon of Hippocamp, and how it came about as product of a massive collision with the larger moon of Proteus.
  • Centauri Dreams also reports on the discovery of the Neptune moon of Hippocamp.
  • Chris Bertram at Crooked Timber notes how the attempt to revoke the citizenship of Shamima Begum sets a terribly dangerous precedent for the United Kingdom.
  • D-Brief notes new evidence suggesting the role of the Deccan Traps volcanic eruptions in triggering the Cretaceous extinction event, alongside the Chixculub asteroid impact.
  • Far Outliers notes the problems of Lawrence of Arabia with Indian soldiers and with Turks.
  • L.M. Sacasas at The Frailest Thing takes issue with the state of philosophical contemplation about technology, at least in part a structural consequence of society.
  • Hornet Stories shares this feature examining the future of gay porn, in an environment where amateur porn undermines the existing studios.
  • JSTOR Daily considers the spotty history of casting African-American dancers in ballet.
  • Language Hat suggests that the Académie française will soon accept for French feminized nouns of nouns links to professionals (“écrivaine” for a female writer, for instance).
  • The LRB Blog considers the implications of the stripping of citizenship from Shamima Begum. Who is next? How badly is citizenship weakened in the United Kingdom?
  • Marginal Revolution notes the upset of Haiti over its banning by Expedia.
  • The NYR Daily notes the tension in Turkey between the country’s liberal laws on divorce and marriage and rising Islamization.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel looks at the moment, in the history of the universe, when dark energy became the dominant factors in the universe’s evolution.
  • Towleroad remembers Roy Cohn, the lawyer who was the collaborator of Trump up to the moment of Cohn’s death from AIDS.
  • Understanding Society’s Daniel Little takes a look at Marx’s theories of how governments worked.
  • Window on Eurasia looks at the existential pressures facing many minority languages in Russia.

[DM] Some news links: public art, history, marriage, diaspora, assimilation

Some more population-related links popped up over the past week.

  • CBC Toronto reported on this year’s iteration of Winter Stations. A public art festival held on the Lake Ontario shorefront in the east-end Toronto neighbourhood of The Beaches, Winter Stations this year will be based around the theme of migration.
  • JSTOR Daily noted how the interracial marriages of serving members of the US military led to the liberalization of immigration law in the United States in the 1960s. With hundreds of thousands of interracial marriages of serving members of the American military to Asian women, there was simply no domestic constituency in the United States
  • Ozy reported on how Dayton, Ohio, has managed to thrive in integrating its immigrant populations.
  • Amro Ali, writing at Open Democracy, makes a case for the emergence of Berlin as a capital for Arab exiles fleeing the Middle East and North America in the aftermath of the failure of the Arab revolutions. The analogy he strikes to Paris in the 1970s, a city that offered similar shelter to Latin American refugees at that time, resonates.
  • Alex Boyd at The Island Review details, with prose and photos, his visit to the isolated islands of St. Kilda, inhabited from prehistoric times but abandoned in 1930.
  • VICE looks at the plight of people who, as convicted criminals, were deported to the Tonga where they held citizenship. How do they live in a homeland they may have no experience of? The relative lack of opportunity in Tonga that drove their family’s earlier migration in the first place is a major challenge.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how, in many post-Soviet countries including the Baltic States and Ukraine, ethnic Russians are assimilating into local majority ethnic groups. (The examples of the industrial Donbas and Crimea, I would suggest, are exceptional. In the case of the Donbas, 2014 might well have been the latest point at which a pro-Russian separatist movement was possible.)

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait looks at the evidence for the massive collision that left exoplanet Kepler 107c an astoundingly dense body.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly tells her readers the secrets of the success of her relationship with her husband, Jose.
  • Centauri Dreams notes what the New Horizons probe has found out, of Ultima Thule and of Pluto, by looking back.
  • The Crux shares the obituaries of scientists from NASA for the Opportunity rover.
  • D-Brief reports that NASA has declared the Opportunity rover’s mission officially complete.
  • Dead Things introduces its readers to Mnyamawamtuka, a titanosaur from Tanzania a hundred million years ago.
  • Drew Ex Machina shares a stunning photo of Tropical Cyclone Gita, taken from the ISS in 2018.
  • Far Outliers notes how the Indian Army helped save the British army’s positions from collapse in the fall of 1914.
  • Joe. My. God. notes a Christian group in the United States trying to encourage a boycott of supposedly leftist candy manufacturers like Hershey’s.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at why covenant marriage failed to become popular.
  • Scott Lemieux at Lawyers, Guns and Money explains the hatred for new Congressperson Ilham Omar.
  • The Planetary Society Blog links to ten interesting podcasts relating to exploration, of Earth and of space.
  • Drew Rowsome interviews Tobias Herzberg about Feygele, his show in the Rhubarb festival at Buddies in Bad Times.
  • Frank Jacobs at Strange Maps looks at the evidence, presented by (among others) Geneviève von Petzinger, suggesting that forty thousand years ago cave artists around the world may have shared a common language of symbols.
  • Window on Eurasia suggests that the policies of Putin are contributing to a growing sense of nationalism in Belarus.

[LINK] Some Friday links

To start things off, blogTO, Spacing Toronto, and Torontoist (1, 2) all have posts covering last night’s storm here in Toronto.

  • Far Outliers examines the reasons behind Japan’s shift towards stronger patriarchy from the 13th century on and the reaction of many women to this.
  • Hunting Monsters examines the inordinately complex procedures behind electing city mayors in Bosnia’s Mostar and reflects on the lack of reckoning for perpetrators of war crimes.
  • Language Hat links to an article exploring the phrases that Welsh-speakers use while texting.
  • Marginal Revolution reports on how market distortions in Iraq–in this case, in the Yezidi marriage market’s dowries–can be transformative.
  • Noel Maurer discovers that Brazil’s generous terms with can also be expected to be repeated with Peru, as powerful but generous Brazil organizes South America around itself. Confusion over Mexican government spending priorities also features, rightly.
  • Slap Upside the Head reports on the case of a Vancouver lesbian couple who were denied the right to a Sunday family transit pass by a bus driver.
  • Spacing Toronto’s Sean Marshall takes a look at Philadelphia’s new streetcars and their routes.
  • Strange Maps examines the history of the much-searched after but ultimately fraudulent arctic island of Buss.
  • Towleroad reports on the case of an Israeli DJ at a Bedouin wedding party for insisting on playing the Pet Shop Boys.
  • Window on Eurasia features various links, one suggesting that many Russians don’t accept Ukrainians’ lack of a Russian identity either cultural or political, another speculating that Chechnya’s increased isolation from Russia and from modern socioeconomic structures might lead to its secession.