A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘mars

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

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  • Centauri Dreams takes a look at the exciting early news on potentially habitable nearby exoplanet Ross 128 b.
  • The Crux notes that evidence has been found of Alzheimer-like illness in dolphins. Is this, as the scientists argue, a symptom of a syndrome shared between us, big-brained social species with long post-fertility lifespans?
  • D-Brief takes a look at the idea of contemporary life on Mars hiding away in the icy regolith near the surface.
  • Far Outliers notes one argument that Germany lost the Second World War because of the poor quality of its leaders.
  • Gizmodo notes the incredibly bright event PS1-10adi, two and a half billion light-years away. What is it? No one knows …
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money celebrates the end of the Mugabe dictatorship in Zimbabwe.
  • The Map Room Blog links to some fascinating detailed maps of the outcome of the Australian mail-in vote on marriage equality.
  • Roads and Kingdoms visits rural Mexico after the recent quake.
  • Cheri Lucas Rowlands shares some beautiful photos of fantastical Barcelona.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes the insights provided by Pluto’s mysterious cool atmosphere, with its cooling haze, has implications for Earth at a time of global warming.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that Russia is not going to allow even Tatarstan to include the Tatar language as a mandatory school subject.
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[NEWS] Four science links: Florida Keys, life on Mars, Triton vs Neptune, Ross 128 b

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  • Vulnerable ecologies and organisms in the Florida Keys are still recovering from Hurricane Irma (among other disasters). National Geographic reports.
  • Simulations suggest life could exist in the Martian soil not too far removed from the surface. Universe Today reports.
  • New simulations suggest that the Neptunian satellite system disrupted by the arrival of Triton was most like Uranus’. Universe Today reports.
  • News of the existence of Ross 128 b, a potentially Earth-like world orbiting a stable red dwarf star a mere 11 light years away, is exciting. The Guardian reports.

[NEWS] Four science links: new coffee, factories in Ethiopia, Mongolian nomads, Mars water

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  • There are, happily, new breeds of coffee plants being bred to cope with climate change. The Toronto Star reports.
  • High labour and infrastructure costs means that Ethiopia is the only African power likely to challenge China in manufactures. Quartz reports.
  • Wired’s Kevin Kelly is perhaps on a limb in suggesting the lifestyle of Mongolian nomads is a viable world model.
  • The flowing waters of icy Mars were icy, as Universe Today reports.

Written by Randy McDonald

October 22, 2017 at 4:15 pm

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

  • The Crux considers the idea that lower food consumption can lead to greater longevity.
  • D-Brief notes an English field of barley grown entirely by robots.
  • Language Hat wonders if Brexit means that EU English will start to diverge from the norms of the United Kingdom.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money shares an article taking issue with sports fans’ treatment of players.
  • The LRB Blog notes that Nicaragua has signed up to climate-change accords, leaving only the United States.
  • The Map Room Blog links to a new atlas of the Irish Revolution.
  • Marginal Revolution notes that the economy of Turkey is doing surprisingly well.
  • The Planetary Society Blog takes a look at the sorts of technology needed to survive on Mars.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes the winners of the Nobel Prize in Physics, for their detection of gravitational waves.
  • Towleroad shares Mashrou’ Leila’s condemnation of Egyptian authorities for arresting people waving the rainbow flag.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell notes, in passing, the hard work needed to keep artificial intelligences from being racist.
  • Arnold Zwicky links to an interactive map of the bookstores of San Francisco.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

  • Centauri Dreams considers the idea of uploading a digital “Golden Record” into the memory of New Horizons.
  • Crooked Timber takes a look at American legal writer (and judge) Richard Posner’s embrace of pragmatism. What does it mean?
  • D-Brief notes the rapid melting of the glaciers that feed the major rivers of Asia.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to a paper considering ways to detect planets in orbit of red giants.
  • The LRB Blog considers the potential for political tumult in Saudi Arabia, in the wake of arrests and rumours.
  • The Map Room Blog links to a new gravity map of Mars, revealing the crust of that world to be less dense and more variable than thought.
  • The NYR Daily looks at the South China Sea dispute in the wake of Indonesia’s newly restated claims.
  • Roads and Kingdoms looks at Philadelphia’s seasonal cookie–spiced wafer–wars.
  • Drew Rowsome is a big fan of the movie adaptation of It.
  • Window on Eurasia suggests that, for want of better options, the Donbas republics’ people might return to Ukraine.

[NEWS] Four space science links, from Mars to TRAPPIST-1 to Gliese 710 to starships

  • CBC reports on recent research noting markers of hydrothermal activity in the minerals of Mars’ Gale Crater.
  • Universe Today reports on findings that ultraviolet radiation from TRAPPIST-1 is low enough to let its habitable-zone planets retain their volatiles, like water.
  • VICE notes that, in 1.3 million years, red dwarf star Gliese 710 will have a close encounter with our solar system.
  • In light of the Voyagers’ 40th, Becky Ferreira considers some of the latest proposals for crewed starship designs.

Written by Randy McDonald

September 1, 2017 at 8:30 pm

[BLOG] Some Friday links

  • Centauri Dreams notes the latest on fast radio burst FRB 121102.
  • D-Brief makes a good case for the human diet to expand to include insects. I’d like to try an insect burger myself.
  • Dangerous Minds shares some wonderful photos of Joy Division’s Ian Curtis.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to a paper suggesting up to 1% of stars could capture, at least temporarily, rogue planets.
  • Hornet Stories–the new name for Unicorn Booty–notes the latest shake-up in German-language LGBTQ media.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money shares a thoughtful essay by Christa Blackmon, drawing from her experiences as a survivor of Hurricane Andrew. How do you best take care of child survivors?
  • The Map Room Blog links to a fascinating-sounding book, Alastair Bonnett’s new Beyond the Map.
  • The NYR Daily reviews a documentary about the Venerable W, a Buddhist monk in Burma who has led anti-Muslim violence.
  • The Planetary Society Blog considers the way forward for NASA’s Mars Exploration Program.
  • Roads and Kingdoms reports on the search for Texas barbecue in Mexico City.