A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘mars

[BLOG] Five Bad Astronomy links (@badastronomer)

  • Bad Astronomy notes the remarkable burst of starbirth at the core of our galaxy one billion years ago, here.
  • Bad Astronomy shares a flyby video of the Mars moon of Phobos.
  • Bad Astronomer reports on a strange storm around the south pole of Jupiter, here.
  • Bad Astronomer reports on an outburst following a debris impact seen by TESS on comet 47P/Wirtanen.
  • Bad Astronomer notes the continuing debate over the dynamic nature of the spiral arms of galaxies.

Written by Randy McDonald

December 22, 2019 at 3:00 pm

[BLOG] Some Friday links

  • Architectuul looks at the Portuguese architectural cooperative Ateliermob, here.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait looks at how white dwarf WD J091405.30+191412.25 is literally vapourizing a planet in close orbit.
  • Caitlin Kelly at the Broadside Blog explains</a< to readers why you really do not want to have to look for parking in New York City.
  • Centauri Dreams looks at the slowing of the solar wind far from the Sun.
  • John Holbo at Crooked Timber considers the gap between ideals and actuals in the context of conspiracies and politics.
  • The Dragon’s Tales reports on how the ESA is trying to solve a problem with the parachutes of the ExoMars probe.
  • Far Outliers reports on what Harry Truman thought about politicians.
  • Gizmodo reports on a new method for identifying potential Earth-like worlds.
  • io9 pays tribute to legendary writer, of Star Trek and much else, D.C. Fontana.
  • The Island Review reports on the football team of the Chagos Islands.
  • Joe. My. God. reports that gay Olympian Gus Kenworthy will compete for the United Kingdom in 2020.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at how early English imperialists saw America and empire through the lens of Ireland.
  • Paul Campos at Lawyers, Guns and Money does not like Pete Buttigieg.
  • The LRB Blog looks at the London Bridge terrorist attack.
  • The Map Room Blog shares a map of Prince William Sound, in Alaska, that is already out of date because of global warming.
  • Marginal Revolution questions if Cebu, in the Philippines, is the most typical city in the world.
  • The NYR Daily looks at gun violence among Arab Israelis.
  • The Planetary Society Blog considers what needs to be researched next on Mars.
  • Roads and Kingdoms tells the story of Sister Gracy, a Salesian nun at work in South Sudan.
  • The Russian Demographics Blog shares a paper noting continued population growth expected in much of Europe, and the impact of this growth on the environment.
  • Strange Maps shares a map of fried chicken restaurants in London.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel explains why a 70 solar mass black hole is not unexpected.
  • John Scalzi at Whatever gives</a his further thoughts on the Pixel 4.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that, last year, 37 thousand Russians died of HIV/AIDS.
  • Arnold Zwicky starts from a consideration of the 1948 film Kind Hearts and Coronets.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

  • Bad Astronomy notes the very odd structure of galaxy NGC 2775.
  • Dangerous Minds reports on the 1987 riot by punks that wrecked a Seattle ferry.
  • Bruce Dorminey reports on a new suggestion from NASA that the massive dust towers of Mars have helped dry out that world over eons.
  • The Everyday Sociology Blog looks at how changing technologies have led to younger people spending more social capital on maintaining relationships with friends over family.
  • This forum hosted at Gizmodo considers the likely future causes of death of people in coming decades.
  • In Media Res’ Russell Arben Fox reports on the debate in Wichita on what to do with the Century II performance space.
  • Joe. My. God. reports on the decision of Hungary to drop out of Eurovision, apparently because of its leaders’ homophobia.
  • JSTOR Daily reports on the debunking of the odd theory that the animals and people of the Americas were degenerate dwarfs.
  • Language Hat reports on how the classics can be served by different sorts of translation.
  • Robert Farley at Lawyers, Guns and Money considers how Trump’s liberation of war criminals relates to folk theories about just wars.
  • The LRB Blog reports from the ground in the Scotland riding of East Dunbartonshire.
  • Marginal Revolution shares a paper suggesting that, contrary to much opinion, social media might actually hinder the spread of right-wing populism.
  • The NYR Daily looks at the nature of the proxy fighters in Syria of Turkey. Who are they?
  • Drew Rowsome interviews Sensational Sugarbum, star of–among other things–the latest Ross Petty holiday farce.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel explains why we still need to be able to conduct astronomy from the Earth.
  • Strange Maps explains the odd division of Europe between east and west, as defined by different subspecies of mice.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how Chinese apparently group Uighurs in together with other Central Asians of similar language and religion.
  • Arnold Zwicky explores the concept of onomatomania.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait observes that a team may have discovered the elusive neutron star produced by Supernova 1987A, hidden behind a cloud of dust.
  • Chris Bertram at Crooked Timber shares a photo he made via the time-consuming 19th century wet-plate collodion method.
  • Drew Ex Machina’s Andrew LePage looks at the Apollo 12 visit to the Surveyor 3 site to, among other things, see what it might suggest about future space archeology.
  • Karen Sternheimer at the Everyday Sociology Blog looks at the story of rural poverty facing a family in Waverly, Ohio, observing how it is a systemic issue.
  • George Dvorsky at Gizmodo looks at how Mars’ Jezero crater seems to have had a past relatively friendly to life, good for the next NASA rover.
  • Joe. My. God. reports on the latest ignorance displayed by Donald Trump Jr. on Twitter, this time regarding HIV.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at how Climategate was used to undermine popular opinion on climate change.
  • Language Hat links to an article explaining why so many works of classical literature were lost, among other things not making it onto school curricula.
  • Language Log shares a photo of a Muji eraser with an odd English label.
  • Scott Lemieux at Lawyers, Guns and Money suggests Pete Buttigieg faces a campaign-limiting ceiling to his support among Democrats.
  • The LRB Blog argues that Macron’s blocking of EU membership possibilities for the western Balkans is a terrible mistake.
  • The Map Room Blog shares a map depicting regional variations in Canada towards anthropogenic climate change. Despite data issues, the overall trend of oil-producing regions being skeptical is clear.
  • Marginal Revolution links to a paper examining the slowing pace of labour mobility in the US, suggesting that home attachment is a key factor.
  • Frederic Wehrey at the NYR Daily tells the story of Knud Holmboe, a Danish journalist who came to learn about the Arab world working against Italy in Libya.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel explains why thermodynamics does not explain our perception of time.
  • Understanding Society’s Dan Little looks at Electronic Health Records and how they can lead to medical mistakes.
  • Whatever’s John Scalzi shares a remarkable photo of the night sky he took using the astrophotography mode on his Pixel 4 phone.
  • Window on Eurasia shares an opinion that the Intermarium countries, between Germany and Russia, can no longer count on the US and need to organize in their self-defense.
  • Arnold Zwicky shares a photo of his handsome late partner Jacques Transue, taken as a college student.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

(A day late, I know; I crashed after work yesterday.)

  • Antipope’s Charlie Stross has a thought experiment: If you were superwealthy and guaranteed to live a long health life, how would you try to deal with the consequence of economic inequality?
  • Vikas Charma at Architectuul takes a look at the different factors that go into height in buildings.
  • Bad Astronomy notes S5-HVS1, a star flung out of the Milky Way Galaxy by Sagittarius A* at 1755 kilometres per second.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly shares photos from two Manhattan walks of hers, taken in non-famous areas.
  • Centauri Dreams looks at habitability for red dwarf exoplanets. Stellar activity matters.
  • Maria Farrell at Crooked Timber shares words from a manifesto about data protection in the EU.
  • Dangerous Minds shares photos from Los Angeles punks and mods and others in the 1980s.
  • Bruce Dorminey notes a ESA report suggesting crew hibernation could make trips to Mars easier.
  • Gizmodo notes that the Hayabusa2 probe of Japan is returning from asteroid Ryugu with a sample.
  • Imageo shares photos of the disastrous fires in Australia from space.
  • Information is Beautiful reports on winners of the Information is Beautiful Awards for 2019, for good infographics.
  • JSTOR Daily explains how local television stations made the ironic viewing of bad movies a thing.
  • Kotaku reports on the last days of Kawasaki Warehouse, an arcade in Japan patterned on the demolished Walled City of Kowloon.
  • Language Hat notes how translation mistakes led to the star Beta Cygni gaining the Arabic name Albireo.
  • Language Log reports on a unique Cantonese name of a restaurant in Hong Kong.
  • Robert Farley at Lawyers, Guns and Money links to an analysis of his suggesting the military of India is increasingly hard-pressed to counterbalance China.
  • The LRB Blog notes the catastrophe of Venice.
  • Marginal Revolution notes a paper suggesting states would do well not to place their capitals too far away from major population centres.
  • Justin Petrone at North! remarks on a set of old apple preserves.
  • The NYR Daily looks at how the west and the east of the European Union are divided by different conceptions of national identity.
  • Jim Belshaw at Personal Reflections reports from his town of Armidale as the smoke from the Australian wildfires surrounds all. The photos are shocking.
  • Emily Lakdawalla at the Planetary Society Blog lists some books about space suitable for children.
  • Drew Rowsome reviews the Canadian film music Stand!, inspired by the 1919 Winnipeg General Strike.
  • The Russian Demographics Blog shares a paper noting that, in Switzerland, parenthood does not make people happy.
  • The Signal notes that 1.7 million phone book pages have been scanned into the records of the Library of Congress.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel explains the concept of multi-messenger astronomy and why it points the way forward for studies of astrophysics.
  • Strange Maps looks at how a majority of students in the United States attend diverse schools, and where.
  • Strange Company explores the mysterious death of Marc-Antoine Calas, whose death triggered the persecution of Huguenots and resulted in the mobilization of Enlightenment figures like Voltaire against the state. What happened?
  • Towleroad hosts a critical, perhaps disappointed, review of the major gay play The Inheritance.
  • Understanding Society’s Daniel Little looks at the power of individual people in political hierarchies.
  • Window on Eurasia shares an opinion piece noting how many threats to the Russian language have come from its association with unpopular actions by Russia.
  • Arnold Zwicky explores queens as various as Elizabeth I and Adore Delano.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • Bad Astronomer notes the latest news on interstellar comet 2/Borisov.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly emphasizes how every writer does need an editor.
  • Centauri Dreams notes how the gas giant GJ 3512 b, half the mass of Jupiter orbiting a red dwarf star closely, is an oddly massive exoplanet.
  • Gina Schouten at Crooked Timber looks at inter-generational clashes on parenting styles.
  • D-Brief looks at the methods of agriculture that could conceivably sustain a populous human colony on Mars.
  • Bruce Dorminey argues that we on Earth need something like Starfleet Academy, to help us advance into space.
  • Colby King at the Everyday Sociology Blog looks at how the socio-spatial perspective helps us understand the development of cities.
  • Russell Arben Fox at In Media Res listens to the Paul McCartney album Flaming Pie.
  • io9 looks at Proxima, a contemporary spaceflight film starring Eva Green.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at how the intense relationship between the US and Saudi Arabia began in, and reflected, the era of Jim Crow.
  • Language Hat notes a report suggesting that multilingualism helps ward off dementia.
  • Language Log takes issue with the names of the mascots of the 2022 Beijing Winter Olympics.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes the emergence of a ninth woman complaining about being harassed by Al Franken.
  • Marginal Revolution links to a new paper arguing that the Washington Consensus worked.
  • The NYR Daily shares an Aubrey Nolan cartoon illustrating the evacuation of war children in the United Kingdom during the Second World War.
  • At Out of Ambit, Diane Duane shares a nice collection of links for digital mapmakers.
  • The Planetary Society Blog looks at how the European Space Agency supports the cause of planetary defense.
  • Roads and Kingdoms interviews Kenyan writer Kevin Mwachiro at length.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel reports on how a mysterious fast radio burst helped illuminate an equally mysterious galactic halo.
  • Strange Company reports on the mysterious and unsolved death in 1936 of Canadian student Thomas Moss in an Oxfordshire hayrick.
  • Frank Jacobs at Strange Maps notes how Mount Etna is a surpassingly rare decipoint.
  • Understanding Society considers the thought of Koj√®ve, after Hegel, on freedom.
  • Window on Eurasia looks at the falling numbers of Russians, and of state support for Russian language and culture, in independent Central Asia.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell looks at how individual consumer responses are much less effective than concerted collective action in triggering change.
  • Arnold Zwicky reports on some transgender fashion models.

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes how TESS detected a star being torn apart by a distant black hole.
  • Centauri Dreams’ Paul Gilster looks at the past and future of the blog.
  • Crooked Timber takes on the sensitive issue of private schools in the United Kingdom.
  • The Crux considers the question of why women suffer from Alzheimer’s at a higher frequency than men.
  • D-Brief notes a study suggesting that saving the oceans of the Earth could reduce the effects of global warming by 20%.
  • Bruce Dorminey considers a paper suggesting that, if not for its volcanic resurfacing, Venus could have remained an Earth-like world to this day.
  • The Dragon’s Tale notes that NASA will deploy a cubesat in the proposed orbit of the Lunar Gateway station to make sure it is a workable orbit.
  • Andrew LePage at Drew Ex Machina looks at Soyuz T-10a, the first crewed mission to abort on the launch pad.
  • Gizmodo reports on a paper arguing that we should intentionally contaminate Mars (and other bodies?) with our world’s microbes.
  • io9 looks at how Warner Brothers is trying to control, belatedly, the discourse around the new Joker movie.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at how, in industrializing London, women kidnapped children off the streets.
  • Language Hat links to a page examining the Arabic and Islamic elements in Dune.
  • Scott Lemieux at Lawyers, Guns and Money looks at a new documentary examining the life of Trump mentor Roy Cohn.
  • The LRB Blog looks at how BBC protocols are preventing full discussion of public racism.
  • The Map Room Blog looks at different efforts to reimagining the subway map of New York City.
  • Marginal Revolution shares a paper claiming that increased pressure on immigrants to assimilate in Italy had positive results.
  • The NYR Daily looks at the background to George Washington’s statements about the rightful place of Jews in the United States.
  • Casey Dreier at the Planetary Society Blog looks at the political explanation of the massive increase in the planetary defense budget of NASA.
  • Drew Rowsome takes a look at the Rocky Horror Show, with its celebration of sexuality (among other things).
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel considers why there are so many unexpected black holes in the universe.
  • Frank Jacobs at Strange Maps examines why Google Street View is not present in Germany (and Austria).
  • The Volokh Conspiracy reports on a ruling in a UK court that lying about a vasectomy negates a partner’s consent to sex.
  • Window on Eurasia notes the controversy about some Buryat intellectuals about giving the different dialects of their language too much importance.