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Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘medicine

[URBAN NOTE] Five Canada links: Ontario golf and sales tax, Goderich, Winnipeg, Vancouver

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  • TVO notes that municipally-operated gold courses are apparently commonplace in Ontario. Should cities divest of these, freeing up land and cost for other better uses?
  • The idea of municipal sales taxes seems like something that should get implemented in Ontario cities, yet few seem willing to move on this. The Toronto Star examines the issue.
  • CBC reports on how the small southern Ontario town of Goderich managed to accumulate 18 family doctors, thanks to a concerted and planned effort to recruit new physicians.
  • Global News takes a look at some of the ghost signs of Winnipeg, legacies of an early commercial era.
  • Terry Glavin at MacLean’s suggests that the government of British Columbia might finally be taking steps to ensure affordable real estate options in Metro Vancouver.
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[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

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  • David Shane Lowry at anthro{dendum} considers the extent to which implicit policies of eugenics, determining whose survival matters and whose do not, exist in the 21st century in an era of climate change.
  • Kambiz Kamrani at Anthropology.net takes issue with the contention of Richard Goss that Neanderthals became extinct because they lacked the physical coordination necessary to be good hunters or good artists.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes that the Chixculub asteroid impactor 66 million years ago created a tectonic shock worldwide that made things worse, the effects of the impact winter being worsened by massive induced volcanic activity.
  • D-Brief shares the story of a British man whose chronic pain was relieved by a swim in icy-cold winter waters.
  • The Dragon’s Tales reports that China may well be on track to building the first exoscale computer, first in the world.
  • Hornet Stories notes that out Olympic athlete Eric Radford is the first to win a gold medal.
  • JSTOR Daily engages with an old conundrum of economists: why are diamonds more expensive than water?
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money examines how urban Native Americans tend to have insecure housing, being on the margins of the real estate market in cities and without options in their home reserves. This surely also is the case in Canada, too.
  • Lucy McKeon at the NYR Daily writes about all the photographs she has never seen, images that she has only heard descriptions of.
  • Drew Rowsome notes the reappearance of queer theatre festival Rhubarb at Buddies in Bad Times, with shows starting tomorrow.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes that the Trump administration’s proposed budget for NASA in FY2019 will gut basic science programs.
  • Window on Eurasia notes the emergence of a survivalist subculture in Russia, following somewhat the pattern of the United States.
  • Arnold Zwicky starts from noting a sample of a rap song in a Mountain Dew commercial and goes interesting places in his latest meditations.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

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  • Crooked Timber links to John Quiggin’s article in the Guardian about how formerly public companies should be renationalized.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes that Lockheed has just signed a $US 150 million dollar contract to deliver a 60 kilowatt laser weapon to the US navy by 2020.
  • Hornet Stories ranks the different performances at last night’s Grammies, giving Kesha top placing.
  • JSTOR Daily looks back to contemporary coverage of the 1918 flu epidemic. How did people react, how did they cope?
  • Language Hat looks at a multilingual comic by Japan-born artist Ru Kawahata, Stuck in the Middle.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money suggests that, rather than hoping for Trump to perform to minimal expectations in the upcoming State of the Union address, it might be more profitable (and enjoyable?) to wait for the inevitable meltdown. What will it be?
  • Marginal Revolution notes a proposal in Rotterdam for police to arrest people wearing expensive clothes and jewellery and, if they cannot explain where they got them, confiscate them. Of course this policy could not be misused.
  • Towleroad notes that drag queens have quit Burkhart’s, a prominent gay bar in Atlanta, in response to that bar’s owner’s racist and alt-right statements on Facebook.
  • Paul Cassell at the Volokh Conspiracy argues Judge Rosemarie Aquilina was entirely correct in allowing all the victims of Nassar to speak at sentencing.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that radical Islamists are increasingly using Russian to communicate, not the traditional languages of Russia’s Muslim populations. Linguistic assimilation does not equal cultural assimilation.

[NEWS] Four queer links: healthcare, SOGI, citizenship, apps

  • Robbie Gonzalez at Wired notes how new Trump Administration measures supposedly guaranteeing “religious freedom” and abandoning data collection will hurt queer people in the US seeking healthcare.
  • Dennis Altman at The Conversation argues that “SOGI”, for “Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity”, is a more useful acronym than “LGBTI …”
  • Towleroad notes a new lawsuit in the United States intended to ensure that children of queer couples born abroad can automatically claim American citizenship.
  • Alex McKeen notes critics of the Bruce McArthur serial murder investigation who suggest police have been much too quick to warn about online apps, perhaps neglecting other ways people get in touch, over at the Toronto Star.

[NEWS] Five science links: cocoliztli in Mexico, English forest, geothermal and tidal, space science

  • National Geographic notes a new study suggesting that a salmonella variant was substantially responsible for a mysterious plague, cocoliztli, that depopulated 16th century Mexico.
  • Wired reports on a worthy attempt at environmental engineering in the United Kingdom, an attempt to build a coast-to-coast forest in northern England.
  • National Observer notes that the government of Canada is preparing funding for higher-risk clean power technologies including geothermal and tidal energy.
  • Universe Today’s Matt Williams notes a new study, drawing from LIGO data, determining that at their most massive non-rotating neutron stars can only have 2.16 solar masses.
  • Matt Williams at Universe Today observes the detection of a stellar-mass black hole candidate in the heart of globular cluster NGC 3201. It’s not an intermediate-mass black hole, but it’s something!

[BLOG] Some Friday links

  • ‘Nathan Smith at Apostrophen points out the profound wrongness of a same-sex romance novel that has (for starters) protagonists involved in LGBT conversion camps described sympathetically.
  • Centauri Dreams notes the exciting new detailed surface map of Titan. Among other things, that world has a sea level common to all its liquid bodies, and they have sharp shores.
  • The Crux notes a new effort to understand Antarctica underneath the ice. What happened the last time its ice melted?
  • Bruce Dorminey notes that Venus is actually really important for astronomers who are interested in extraterrestrial life.
  • The Everyday Sociology Blog explains why it is important to learn about social theory if you’re a sociologist. Discourse matters.
  • Far Outliers notes the many translations of Hawaii’s “TheBus” into the Asian languages spoken there.
  • Hornet Stories notes research suggesting that product ads targeting LGBTQ markets can have good knock-on effects for these products’ general market share.
  • At In Media Res, Russell Arben Fox has started a series looking back at some of the best songs of 1978.
  • JSTOR Daily notes two education papers suggesting ways art education can improve empathy among students.
  • Language Hat notes a genetic study of populations in the Chachapoyas region of coastal Peru suggesting people there were not displaced by Incan expansion.
  • Language Log reports on a study that examines connections between a person’s lexical diversity and the progress of degenerative brain health issues.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money reports on the possibility that Russian money may have been funneled through the NRA.
  • The NYR Daily reports on the intensely personal performance art of Patty Chang.
  • The Planetary Society Blog reports on the latest discoveries and events surrounding the Dawn probe in its permanent Ceres orbit.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes evidence that extrasolar visitor ‘Oumuamua has been deeply shaped by its encounters with cosmic particles.
  • Transit Toronto shares detailed depictions of some of the new public art installations to be housed in six stations on the Eglinton Crosstown LRT.
  • Window on Eurasia notes the growing presence of Central Asian migrants in the smaller communities of Russia. (Chinese, unsurprisingly, have not made it there.)

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

‘Nathan Smith at Apostrophen points out that claiming to disagree with homosexuality while respecting gay people is nonsensical. https://apostrophen.wordpress.com/2018/01/11/queer-isnt-an-opinion/

Centauri Dreams notes the innovative cheap PicSat satellite, currently monitoring Beta Pictoris with its known exoplanet. https://www.centauri-dreams.org/?p=39109

Corey Robin at Crooked Timber argues that Trump is shaky, weaker than American democracy. (Not that that is going that well, mind.) http://crookedtimber.org/2018/01/13/trumps-power-is-shakier-than-american-democracy/

The Crux points out the sentient, including emotions, of any number of animal species. http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/crux/2018/01/11/animals-feelings-sentient/

Far Outliers notes some German commanders in western Europe who quickly surrendered to the Allies in the Second World War, and why they did that. http://faroutliers.blogspot.com/2018/01/quick-german-surrenders-in-west.html

Hornet Stories notes how a court decision dealing with a Romanian man and his American husband could lead to European Union-wide recognition of same-sex marriage. https://hornetapp.com/stories/european-union-gay-marriage/

JSTOR Daily notes how air pollution is a human rights issue. https://daily.jstor.org/why-air-pollution-is-a-socioeconomic-issue/

Language Hat notes how the use of the apostrophe in the newly Latin script-using Kazakh language is controversial. http://languagehat.com/apostrophe-catastrophe-in-kazakhstan/

Geoffrey Pullim at Lingua Franca shares a passage from Muriel Spark’s fiction depicting students’ reactions to learning foreign languages. https://www.chronicle.com/blogs/linguafranca/2018/01/11/a-foreign-way-which-never-really-caught-on

The LRB Blog tells the story of Omid, an Iranian who managed to smuggle himself from his home country to a precarious life in the United Kingdom. https://www.lrb.co.uk/blog/2018/01/15/behzad-yaghmaian/omids-journey/

The Map Room Blog shares a newly-updated map of “Trumpworld” the world as seen by Donald Trump. http://www.maproomblog.com/2018/01/trumpworld/

Marginal Revolution notes research indicating that dolphins have a grasp on economics, and what this indicates about their sentience. http://marginalrevolution.com/marginalrevolution/2018/01/dolphin-capital-theory.html

The Planetary Society Blog notes how the upcoming Europa Clipper probe will be able to analyze Europa’s oceans without encountering plumes of water. http://www.planetary.org/blogs/jason-davis/2018/20180111-no-plumes-no-problem.html

The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer suggests that, with the declining import of informal rules in American politics, a future Democratic-majority Congress might be able to sneak through statehood for Puerto Rico and Washington D.C. http://noelmaurer.typepad.com/aab/2018/01/breaking-norms-by-adding-states.html

Rocky Planet reports on the disastrous mudflows that have hit southern California after the fires. http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/rockyplanet/2018/01/12/mudflows-devastate-parts-of-southern-california/

Drew Rowsome praises new horror from Matt Ruff. http://drewrowsome.blogspot.com/2018/01/lovecraft-country-matt-ruffs-multi.html

Peter Rukavina talks about his positive experiences with a walk-in mental health clinic on the Island. https://ruk.ca/content/i-went-mental-health-walk-clinic-and-so-can-you

Strange Company talks about the bizarre 1982 disappearance of one Donald Kemp. Did he even die? http://strangeco.blogspot.com/2018/01/the-strange-exit-of-donald-kemp.html

Towleroad notes that Peter Thiel is trying to buy Gawker, perhaps to destroy its archives. http://www.towleroad.com/2018/01/gawker-peter-thiel/