A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘medicine

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

leave a comment »

  • D-Brief notes that the opioid epidemic seems to be hitting baby boomers and millennials worst, of all major American demographics.
  • Hornet Stories shares one timetable for new DC films following Justice League.
  • Joe. My. God. notes a case brought by a Romanian before the European Court of Justice regarding citizenship rights for his American spouse. This could have broad implications for the recognition of same-sex couples across the EU, not just its member-states.
  • Language Hat reports on a journalist’s search for a village in India where Sanskrit, ancient liturgical language of Hinduism, remains the vernacular.
  • The Map Room Blog links to a review of an intriuging new book, Nowherelands, looking at ephemeral countries in the 1840-1975 era.
  • The NYR Daily looks at the textile art of Anni Albers.
  • The Planetary Society Blog explores the navigational skills of the Polynesians, and their reflection in Moana.
  • Roads and Kingdoms reports on the widespread jubilation in Zimbabwe following the overthrow of Mugabe.
  • Rocky Planet notes that Öræfajökull, the largest volcano in Iceland if a hidden one, has been showing worrying signs of potential eruption.
  • Drew Rowsome reports on House Guests, an art installation that has taken over an entire house at Dundas and Ossington.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel looks at the story of how the quantum property of spin was discovered.
  • Window on Eurasia suggests new Russian policies largely excluding non-Russian languages from education are causing significant problems, even ethnic conflict.
  • Arnold Zwicky considers music as a trigger of emotional memory, generally and in his own life.
Advertisements

[BLOG] Some Monday links

leave a comment »

  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly takes a look at the concept of resilience.
  • D-Brief notes the many ways in which human beings can be killed by heat waves.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze notes a claim for the discovery of a new pulsar planet, PSR B0329+54 b, two Earth masses with an orbit three decades long.
  • The Frailest Thing’s Michael Sacasas argues that, in some was, online connectivity is like a drug.
  • Hornet Stories considers the plight of bisexuals in the closet.
  • Language Hat considers the origins of the family name of Hungarian Karl-Maria Kertbeny, the man who developed the term “homosexuality”, and much else besides.
  • The NYR Daily looks at how the item of soap was a key component behind racism and apartheid in South Africa.
  • Progressive Download’s John Farrell notes a new book, The Quotable Darwin.
  • Peter Rukavina takes a look at 18 years’ worth of links on his blog. How many are still good? The answer may surprise you.
  • Understanding Society considers the insights of Tony Judt on the psychology of Europeans after the Second World War.
  • John Scalzi at Whatever considers, in Q&A format, some insights for men in the post-Weinstein era.
  • Window on Eurasia looks at how boundaries in the Caucasus were not necessarily defined entirely by the Bolsheviks.
  • Arnold Zwicky considers various odd appearances of pickles in contemporary popular culture.

[URBAN NOTE] Five Toronto links: mass transit, Glad Day, Sam the Record Man, housing, Moss Park

leave a comment »

  • CBC reports on how Toronto city council has just voted in favour of harmonizing TTC and Metrolinx fares.
  • On the eve of the Naked Heart Festival, Peter Knegt celebrates the role of Glad Day Bookshop in the Toronto queer community, over at CBC.
  • blogTO notes that the old Sam the Record Man sign is starting to get installed at Yonge and Dundas.
  • Will Google’s Sidewalk Labs project in Toronto worsen the affordable housing crisis? VICE reports.
  • NOW Toronto takes a look at some of the problems with the new Moss Park safe injection site, starting with official neglect.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to a paper suggesting exoplanet transits could start a galactic communications network.
  • The Everyday Sociology Blog looks at the connections between eating and identity.
  • The Frailest Thing’s Michael Sacasas looks at the need for a critical study of the relationship between technology and democracy.
  • Language Hat notes how nationalism split Hindustani into separate Hindi and Urdu languages.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money reflects on the grim outlook in Somalia after the terrible recent Mogadishu bombing.
  • Marginal Revolution’s Tyler Cowen thinks Trump’s decertification of the Iran deal is a bad idea.
  • The Map Room Blog links to an article imagining a counter-mapping of the Amazon by indigenous peoples.
  • Neuroskeptic considers the possibility of Parkinson’s being a prion disease, somewhat like mad cow disease.
  • The NYR Daily notes that a Brexit driven by a perceived need to take back control will not meet that need, at all.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw looks at the problem Sydney faces as it booms.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer looks at the extent to which an independent Catalonia would be ravaged economically by a non-negotiated secession.
  • Peter Watts tells the sad story of an encounter between Toronto police and a homeless man he knows.
  • Window on Eurasia notes a Sakhalin bridge, like a Crimea bridge, may not come off because of Russian weakness.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • Anthropology.net notes that the analysis of a Neanderthal skeleton from Croatia reveals much common ancestry.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait shares some stunning photos of Jupiter taken by the Juno probe.
  • Crooked Timber considers the differences–such as they are–between science fiction and fantasy literature.
  • After a conversation with Adam Gopnik, Cody Delistraty makes a case for the importance of high-brow culture.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze notes a paper arguing that Earth-like planets can exist even without active plate tectonics.
  • The Frailest Thing’s Michael Sacasas argues that operating systems relying on instinct hurt human thought.
  • Language Log considers Twitter post limits for East Asian languages.
  • The LRB Blog considers trench fever and the future of nursing in the United Kingdom.
  • Marginal Revolution links to a study suggesting people actively look out for bad and threatening news items.
  • The NYR Daily examines the reasons why Uber ended up getting banned by the city of London.
  • Drew Rowsome reports on an exciting new staging at the Paramount Theatre of Salt-Water Moon.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel looks at the very low proportion of planets in studied exosystems actually detected by Kepler.
  • Strange Company tells the story of John Banvard, a 19th century American who lost everything in mounting panorama exhibitions.
  • Towleroad reports on how PREP contributed to an 80% fall in new HIV diagnoses in London and wider England.
  • Window on Eurasia notes the worsening of HIV/AIDS in Russia, aided by terrible government policy and bad statistics.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes the discovery of activity on distant comet
    C/2017 K2.
  • Centauri Dreams notes a new proposal for an orbital telescope that could detect Earth-like worlds at Alpha Centauri A and B.
  • D-Brief notes a new research finding that chimpanzees can learn to use tools on their own, without teaching.
  • Dangerous Minds notes the interesting Detroit character of Gundella, the Green Witch of Detroit.
  • Language Log tries to decipher some garbled Hebrew at an American wedding.
  • The LRB Blog looks at the continued aftershocks, social and otherwise, from the recent earthquake in Mexico.
  • Marginal Revolution argues that North Korea is set to become more China’s problem than the United States’.
  • Roads and Kingdoms notes the simple pleasures of soy milk in China.
  • Seriously Science notes a study looking at the different factors in the personalities of cats.
  • Towleroad notes the recent discovery of an antibody effective against 99% or so variants of HIV.
  • Window on Eurasia argues Russian politics play a central role in getting Russophones in Ukraine to become Ukrainian.

[ISL] Four Hawai’i links: Molokai, nuclear attack, doctor shortages, coffee leaf tea

  • Up to a third of the island of Molokai, in Hawaii, is for sale, but the land comes with strings attached. Bloomberg reports.
  • Threats from North Korea are encouraging people in Hawaii to consider how to minimize risks of nuclear attack. The National Post reports.
  • Most Hawaiian islands, save Kauai, are apparently facing a growing shortage of doctors. U.S. News and World Report looks at the issue.
  • I strongly approve of the idea of coffee leaf tea becoming the next big thing for agriculture in Hawaii. This press release hints at encouraging potential.

Written by Randy McDonald

September 27, 2017 at 7:30 pm