A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘mexico

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

  • D-Brief reports on the abundance of plastic waste found buried in the beaches of the Cocos Islands.
  • Joe. My. God. notes that the US has imposed tariffs against India.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at the strange history of phrenology.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money takes note of the Trump Administration’s honouring of Arthur Laffer.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer looks at the electricity price crisis that might determine who gets to be elected president of Argentina.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel explains how the Pauli Exclusion Principle makes matter possible.
  • Ilya Somin at the Volokh Conspiracy argues against importing the principles of the Berlin Wall to the US-Mexico border.
  • Window on Eurasia shares concerns that Russia is trying to expand its influence in the east of Belarus.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

  • Bad Astronomy’s Phil Plait reports on a dwarf galaxy collision with galaxy NGC 1232, producing waves of X-rays.
  • The Toronto Library’s The Buzz highlights a collection of books on LGBTQ themes for Pride month.
  • Centauri Dreams looks at studies of the circumstellar disk of HD 163296.
  • D-Brief reports that plastic debris may have contributed to a die-off of puffins by the Bering Sea.
  • Bruce Dorminey shares an image of a rich star-forming region in Cepheus taken by the Spitzer telescope.
  • Imageo reports how smoke from wildfires in Canada have covered literally millions of square kilometres of North America in smoke.
  • io9 notes how, in the limited series Doomsday Clock, Doctor Manhattan has come to a new realization about Superman and the DC multiverse.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at how Luddites are now fashionable again, with their critiques of technology.
  • Language Log reports on a unique whistled version of the Turkish language.
  • Lawyers Guns and Money takes a look its different writers’ production over its 15 years.
  • Emannuel Iduma writes at the NRY Daily about the young people, lives filled with promise, killed in the Biafran War.
  • Corey S. Powell at Out There has an interesting idea: What items of food do the different planets of the solar system resemble?
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer looks at the many stupidities of the new Trump tariffs against Mexico.
  • Peter Rukavina celebrates the 20th anniversary of his blog.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel reports on the exceptionally isolated galaxy MCG+01-02-015, in a void a hundred million light-years away from any other.
  • Window on Eurasia looks at the changing politics and scholarship surrounding mass deaths in Soviet Kazakhstan in the 1930s. https://windowoneurasia2.blogspot.com/2019/05/debate-on-mass-deaths-in-kazakhstan.html
  • Arnold Zwicky looks at flowers coloured magenta in his California.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

  • Matt Thompson at anthro{dendum} writes about the complex, often anthropological, satire in the comics of Charles Addams.
  • Architectuul looks at the photography of Roberto Conte.
  • Bad Astronomy’s Phil Plait notes a new computer model suggesting a supernova can be triggered by throwing a white dwarf into close orbit of a black hole.
  • D-Brief notes how ammonia on the surface of Pluto hints at the existence of a subsurface ocean.
  • Bruce Dorminey notes how the bombardment of Earth by debris from a nearby supernova might have prompted early hominids to become bipedal.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes that NASA has awarded its first contract for its plans in lunar space.
  • Far Outliers notes the reactions, within and without the Soviet Union, to the 1991 Soviet coup attempt.
  • Matt Novak at Gizmodo’s Paleofuture notes how, in 1995, Terry Pratchett predicted the rise of online Nazis.
  • io9 notes the impending physical release this summer of DVDs of the Deep Space Nine documentary What We Left Behind.
  • JSTOR Daily suggests some ways to start gardening in your apartment.
  • Victor Mair at Language Log claims that learning Literary Chinese is a uniquely difficult experience. Thoughts?
  • The NYR Daily features a wide-ranging interview with EU official Michel Barnier focused particularly, but not exclusively, on Brexit.
  • The Planetary Society Blog notes that an Internet vote has produced a majority in favour of naming outer system body 2007 OR10 Gonggang.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer considers the possibility that foreign investors in Mexico might be at risk, at least feel themselves at risk, from the government of AMLO.
  • The Signal looks at how the Library of Congress archives spreadsheets.
  • Van Waffle at the Speed River Journal looks at magenta spreen, a colourful green that he grows in his garden.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes how we on Earth are carelessly wasting irreplaceable helium.
  • Window on Eurasia refers to reports claiming that a third of the population of Turkmenistan has fled that Central Asian state. Could this be accurate?

[URBAN NOTE] Five city links: Ottawa, Montréal, Miami, Mexico City, Berlin

  • CBC Ottawa reports on the complaint of an Ottawa condo-owner that his tenant is renting the unit out via Airbnb.
  • CBC Montreal notes that a rent advocacy agency in the neighbourhood of Saint-Henri is being driven out of its offices by rent increases.
  • VICE reports on how a Miami trailer park and its residents are set to be driven out of their home by luxury housing.
  • CityLab reports on a Mexico City market, the Sonora Market, specializing in goods for religious believers.
  • Reuters notes a street protest by rent activists in Berlin calling for the nationalizing of the housing stock.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

  • Architectuul features a photo essay made by Evan Panagopoulos in the course of a hurried three-hour visit to the Socialist Modernist and modern highlights of 20th century Kiev architecture.
  • Bad Astrronomer Phil Plait notes how the latest planet found in the Kepler-47 circumbinary system evokes Tatooine.
  • Centauri Dreams looks at tide and radiation, and their impacts on potential habitability, in the TRAPPIST-1 system.
  • Citizen Science Salon looks at how the TV show Cyberchase can help get young people interested in science and math.
  • Crooked Timber mourns historian David Brion Davis.
  • The Crux looks at how the HMS Challenger pioneered the study of the deeps of the oceans, with that ship’s survey of the Mariana Trench.
  • D-Brief looks at how a snowball chamber using supercooled water can be used to hunt for dark matter.
  • Earther shares photos of the heartbreaking and artificial devastation of the Amazonian rainforest of Brazil.
  • Gizmodo shares a beautiful Hubble photograph of the southern Crab Nebula.
  • Information is Beautiful shares a reworked version of the Julia Galef illustration of the San Francisco area meme space.
  • io9 notes that, fresh from being Thor, Jane Foster is set to become a Valkyrie in a new comic.
  • JSTOR Daily explains the Victorian fondness for leeches, in medicine and in popular culture.
  • Language Hat links to an interview with linguist Amina Mettouchi, a specialist in Berber languages.
  • Language Log shares the report of a one-time Jewish refugee on changing language use in Shanghai, in the 1940s and now.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money reports on the horror of self-appointed militias capturing supposed undocumented migrants in the southwestern US.
  • Marginal Revolution reports on the circumstances in which volunteer militaries can outperform conscript militaries.
  • At the NYR Daily, Christopher Benfey reports on the surprisingly intense connection between bees and mourning.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw, responding to Israel Folau, considers free expression and employment.
  • The Planetary Society Blog shares a guest post from Barney Magrath on the surprisingly cheap adaptations needed to make an iPhone suitable for astrophotography.
  • Peter Rukavina reports on the hotly-contested PEI provincial election of 1966.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel explains what the discovery of helium hydride actually means.
  • Understanding Society’s Daniel Little praises the Jill Lepore US history These Truths for its comprehensiveness.
  • Window on Eurasia reports on the growing divergences in demographics between different post-Soviet countries.
  • Arnold Zwicky starts with another Peeps creation and moves on from there.

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

  • Centauri Dreams notes the remarkable imaging of the atmosphere of HR 8799 e.
  • Crooked Timber starts a discussion about books that, once picked up, turned out to be as good as promised.
  • The Crux considers obsidian, known in the Game of Thrones world as dragonglass.
  • Bruce Dorminey notes that NASA is considering a proposal for a floating Venus probe that would be recharged by microwaves from orbit.</li.
  • The Dragon’s Tales shares a report that Russia has developed a new satellite to work with a new anti-satellite weapons system.
  • Far Outliers notes what U.S. Grant learned from the Mexican-American War, as a strategist and as a politician.
  • L.M. Sacasas at The Frailest Thing suggests, drawing from the image of M87*, that we have had a world disenchanted by the digital technology used to produce the image.
  • JSTOR Daily shares what critical theory has to say about the binge-watching of television.
  • Language Hat notes the Cherokee-language inscriptions on the wall of Manitou Cave.
  • Language Log considers when the first conversing automaton was built.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money takes a look at a corner of 1970s feminism forgotten despite its innovative ideas.
  • Marginal Revolution considers the idea of restricting some new migrants to particular regions of the United States.
  • The NYR Daily explores the important new work by Igiaba Scego, Beyond Babylon.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel answers a surprisingly complex question: What is an electron?
  • Window on Eurasia explains why the cost of a professional military means Russia will not abandon the draft.
  • Arnold Zwicky explores “johnson” as a euphemism for penis.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

  • At Anthro{dendum}, Travis Cooper shares thoughts o what should be kept in mind in studying new media.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes a new plan to catalogue a hundred thousand stellar nurseries in nearby galaxies.
  • Centauri Dreams notes the very unusual lightcurve of the star VVV-WIT-07.
  • D-Brief considers the possible role of climate change in undermining Byzantium.
  • Gizmodo reports on how astronomers managed to directly image exoplanet HR8799e, a young hot Jupiter some 130 light-years away.
  • JSTOR Daily examines the lynchings inflicted on people of Mexican background in the conquered American West after the Mexican-American War.
  • Marginal Revolution considers the possibility that homo sapiens might trace its ancestry to hominid populations in southern Africa.
  • Noahpinion features a guest post from Roy Bahat arguing that Uber and Lyft need to change their treatment of their workers for their own good.
  • The NYR Daily features an article by Zia Haider Rahman talking about the many ways in which British identity has mutated after Brexit.
  • The Planetary Society Blog features some photos taken by the Beresheet probe on its way to the Moon.
  • Drew Rowsome reviews the Greg Scarnici book Dungeons & Drag Queens, a funny take on Fire Island.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes the early Solar System, when a still energetic Mars existed alongside Earth as a life-supporting planet. (Venus, not so much. Perhaps?)
  • Daniel Little writes at Understanding Society about his new book project, a social ontology of government.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how Russia is dropping off sharply in importance as a trading partner for most post-Soviet states.