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Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘middle east

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

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  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes a new study suggesting some hypervelocity stars were ejected from the Large Magellanic Cloud.
  • Crooked Timber’s John Holbo wonders how else Trump can transgress the norms of the presidency.
  • The Crux notes the exceptional hardiness of the tardigrade. These forms of life might well outlive the sun.
  • Gizmodo notes the evidence for a recently frozen subsurface ocean on Pluto’s Charon.
  • Joe. My. God. notes the Israeli government’s effective, if confused, opposition to same-sex adoption.
  • Unicorn Booty looks at the significant impact RuPaul’s Drag Race has on music sales.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how Putin’s political allies have been having trouble coming up with a positive future.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

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  • Apostrophen’s ‘Nathan Smith updates his readers about the progress of his various writing projects.
  • The Big Picture shares photos from the Battle of Mosul waged against ISIS.
  • Centauri Dreams notes the discovery of rogue binary planet 2MASS J11193254–1137466, two super-Jupiters by themselves.
  • Dangerous Minds notes the raw photography of early 20th century New York City’s Weegee.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money is rightly unimpressed by the reflexive Russophilia of The Nation. Imperialism is still imperialism …
  • Marginal Revolution’s Tyler Cowen strongly recommends Dali, in the Chinese province of Yunnan, for tourists.
  • The NYR Daily features Masha Gessen, looking at the truth underneath the lies of Trump.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer makes a case that Macron’s use of “civilizational” to describe Africa’s issues might be the subject of over-quick outrage.
  • Peter Rukavina describes his two weeks with a Nokia N95, without a modern smartphone. There was good and bad to this.
  • Speed River Journal’s Van Waffle explains, with photos, what hoverflies are and why they are so important.
  • Understanding Society considers a fraught question: what paths to modernization were open for China in the 1930s, before the People’s Republic?
  • Window on Eurasia suggests that, in 30 years, Moscow will be a megacity with a large population of (substantially immigrant) Muslim origin.

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

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  • Language Log argues that, despite a lack of official or public support, Cantonese remains the dominant language of Hong Kong.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money makes the case for the global relevance of the Cranberries’ song “Zombie.”
  • Marginal Revolution seems to like the end results of Canada’s immigration system.
  • The NYR Daily notes that, even after ISIS, Iraq will be beset by multiple ethnoreligious crises.
  • Out There’s Corey S. Powell interviews an astronomer about the very strange Przybylski’s Star, rich in rare radioactive elements.
  • Savage Minds considers the decolonization of anthropology in the context of Iraq.
  • Arnold Zwicky considers the surprisingly deep historical resonance of the loon in Canada.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

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  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly considers the various challenges of being an independent person.
  • Centauri Dreams considers the possibility of a Mars-mass planet in the Kuiper belt.
  • Dangerous Minds notes how the 5Pointz warehouse of NYC, once a graffiti hotspot, has been turned into a condo complex that at best evokes that artistic past.
  • Language Log explores the etymology of “sang”, a descriptor of a Chinese subculture of dispirited youths.
  • The LRB Blog reports on a Border Patrol raid on the No More Deaths encampment in Arizona, a camp that helps save migrant lives in the desert.
  • The Strange Company blogs about the mysterious 1829 disappearance of Judge John Ten Eyck Lansing from New York City.
  • Unicorn Booty describes three gay Muslim immigrants terrified of the implications of President Trump.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy considers pros and cons to the idea of religious arbitration.
  • Window on Eurasia suggests that the Qatar crisis is worsening Sunni/Shia tensions among the Muslims of Russia.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

  • blogTO describes the changing designs of TTC maps over the past generations.
  • Cody Delistraty links to an article of his contrasting and comparing Donald Trump to Louis XIV.
  • Marginal Revolution shares facts about Qatar in this time of its issues.
  • Peter Rukavina describes the latest innovations in his homebrew blogging.
  • Towleroad notes the sad anniversary of the Pulse massacre in Orlando, particularly for queers of colour.
  • Window on Eurasia argues for the potential of Idel-Ural, a coalition of non-Russian minorities by the Volga.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell examines how Labour and the Tories used Big Data, and how Labour did much better.

[NEWS] Seven links, from Nickelback to nuclear energy to Second World War refugees

  • Anthony Easton at MacLean’s writes in defense of Nickelback, one of Canada’s most popular bands if not a critical darling.
  • Also in MacLean’s, Stephanie Carvin notes that the new foreign and military policies announced by the Canadian government could still fall short.
  • Bloomberg View’s Stephen L. Carter considers the idea of the just war through the lens of Wonder Woman.
  • Nuclear energy, it seems, will be India’s answer to global warming in the era of Trump.
  • Qataris, Bloomberg notes, are trying to deal with their island country’s state of siege.
  • Airbus may pull its production plants from the United Kingdom unless the country keeps single market access.
  • Refugees, Lynne Olson notes at National Geographic, helped save the United Kingdom during the Second World War.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

  • D-Brief notes the first-ever use of Einsteinian gravitational bending to examine the mass of a star.
  • Language Log announces the start of an investigation into the evolving rhetoric of Donald Trump. Something is up.
  • The LRB Blog reports from Tuareg Agadez in Niger, about rebellions and migrant-smuggling.
  • Marginal Revolution wonders what is the rationale for the extreme cut-off imposed on Qatar.
  • Maximos62 wonders about the impact of Indonesia’s fires on not just wildlife but indigenous peoples.
  • Personal Reflections notes the irrelevance of the United States’ withdrawal from Paris, at least from an Australian position.
  • Savage Minds points to a new anthropology podcast.
  • Window on Eurasia notes anti-immigrant sentiment in Moscow and reports on the use of Russia’s anti-extremism laws against Protestants.