A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘middle east

[NEWS] Seven links about politics in Canada and around the world

leave a comment »

  • The immigration fiasco in Québec shows the tension between different strains of local nationalism. The Conversation reports.
  • The Québec labour market, Le Devoir notes, actually bears up well to a comparison with Ontario. Gaps in employment have been closed, and then some.
  • Barry Saxifrage at the National Observer notes how, in terms of climate pollution, Alberta and Saskatchewan are heading in the opposite direction from the rest of Canada.
  • Many Canadians, displaced by the collapse of the oil economy, have gone south to Texas. Global News reports.
  • Will the divisions in the United States only get deeper? How bad will it get? MacLean’s considers.
  • The chaos in Iran, and the terrible death toll, deserve to be noted. Is the Islamic Republic nearing, if not its end, some other transition? Open Democracy theorizes.
  • Terry Glavin at MacLean’s notes how governments around the world are facing crises of legitimacy, here.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

leave a comment »

  • Architectuul looks at the Portuguese architectural cooperative Ateliermob, here.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait looks at how white dwarf WD J091405.30+191412.25 is literally vapourizing a planet in close orbit.
  • Caitlin Kelly at the Broadside Blog explains</a< to readers why you really do not want to have to look for parking in New York City.
  • Centauri Dreams looks at the slowing of the solar wind far from the Sun.
  • John Holbo at Crooked Timber considers the gap between ideals and actuals in the context of conspiracies and politics.
  • The Dragon’s Tales reports on how the ESA is trying to solve a problem with the parachutes of the ExoMars probe.
  • Far Outliers reports on what Harry Truman thought about politicians.
  • Gizmodo reports on a new method for identifying potential Earth-like worlds.
  • io9 pays tribute to legendary writer, of Star Trek and much else, D.C. Fontana.
  • The Island Review reports on the football team of the Chagos Islands.
  • Joe. My. God. reports that gay Olympian Gus Kenworthy will compete for the United Kingdom in 2020.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at how early English imperialists saw America and empire through the lens of Ireland.
  • Paul Campos at Lawyers, Guns and Money does not like Pete Buttigieg.
  • The LRB Blog looks at the London Bridge terrorist attack.
  • The Map Room Blog shares a map of Prince William Sound, in Alaska, that is already out of date because of global warming.
  • Marginal Revolution questions if Cebu, in the Philippines, is the most typical city in the world.
  • The NYR Daily looks at gun violence among Arab Israelis.
  • The Planetary Society Blog considers what needs to be researched next on Mars.
  • Roads and Kingdoms tells the story of Sister Gracy, a Salesian nun at work in South Sudan.
  • The Russian Demographics Blog shares a paper noting continued population growth expected in much of Europe, and the impact of this growth on the environment.
  • Strange Maps shares a map of fried chicken restaurants in London.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel explains why a 70 solar mass black hole is not unexpected.
  • John Scalzi at Whatever gives</a his further thoughts on the Pixel 4.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that, last year, 37 thousand Russians died of HIV/AIDS.
  • Arnold Zwicky starts from a consideration of the 1948 film Kind Hearts and Coronets.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

leave a comment »

  • Bad Astronomer considers how a stellar-mass black hole of 70 solar masses got so unaccountably huge.
  • Alex Tolley at Centauri Dreams considers the colours of photosynthesis, and how they might reveal the existence of life on exoplanets.
  • The Dragon’s Tales shares some links on humans in the Paleolithic.
  • Jonathan Wynn at the Everyday Sociology Blog considers the scripts of jokes.
  • Gizmodo reports on the repurposed China-Netherlands radio telescope operating from an orbit above the far side of the Moon.
  • JSTOR Daily considers the political rhetoric of declinism.
  • Language Log considers the controversy over the future of the apostrophe.
  • James Butler at the LRB Blog notes a YouGov prediction of a Conservative majority in the UK and how this prediction is not value-neutral.
  • Marginal Revolution shares a paper from India noting how caste identities do affect the labour supply.
  • Ursula Lindsay at the NYR Daily considers if the political crisis in Lebanon, a product of economic pressures and sectarianism, might lead to a revolutionary transformation of the country away from sectarian politics.
  • Jim Belshaw at Personal Reflections looks at some of the many complicated and intermingled issues of contemporary Australia.
  • The Planetary Society Blog reports on the latest projects funded by the ESA.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel shares ten beautiful photos taken in 2019 by the Hubble.
  • Strange Company reports on the strange unsolved disappearance of Lillian Richey from her Idaho home in 1964.
  • Window on Eurasia shares a Russian criticism of the Ukrainian autocephalous church as a sort of papal Protestantism.
  • Arnold Zwicky considers the positive potential of homoeros.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

  • Bad Astronomy notes the new X-ray telescope eROSITA.
  • Centauri Dreams notes evidence of a recent collision between planets in the system of BD +20 307.
  • D-Brief notes the appearance of a strange new sort of storm on Saturn.
  • Bruce Dorminey notes the discovery by astronomers of a set of orbits that can direct comets into the inner solar system.
  • Drew Ex Machina’s Andrew LePage shares some vintage Skylab photos of his native Massachusetts.
  • Far Outliers notes how, in 1786, the United states was uninclined to pay tribute to the Barbary States.
  • Gizmodo’s George Dvorsky reports on a new fossil discovery showing how quickly mammals took over after the Cretaceous.
  • The Island Review shares an essay by photographer Alex Boyd about his new book Isles of Rust, drawing from Lewis & Harris.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at sustainable butchery.
  • Language Hat notes that Sumerian cuneiform is now in Unicode.
  • Victor Mair at Language Log notes how the Indo-Iranian “don” so commonly forms part of the hydronyms for major European rivers.
  • Scott Lemieux at Lawyers, Guns and Money calls for an in-depth investigation of Donald Trump, not necessarily an impeachment.
  • The LRB Blog examines the background of the mass protests in Santiago and wider Chile.
  • The Map Room Blog shares an illuminating cartogram depicting the #elxn43 results in Canada.
  • Marginal Revolution looks at how the government of China has been using the NBA to buy social peace.
  • The NYR Daily interviews Naomi Oreskes about her campaign to have the science behind global warming, and the actions of the scientists involved, understood.
  • The Russian Demographics Blog links to a paper concluding that traditional gender specializations in British families no longer provide a reproductive advantage.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel explains why the speed of gravity must equal the speed of light, if general relativity is to work.
  • Window on Eurasia examines the rapid and uncontrolled growth of urban populations in Kazakhstan.

[NEWS] Six technology links

  • Carl Newport at WIRED argues that past generations have never been as suspicious of technology as we now think, here.
  • Anthropologist Darren Byler at The Conversation argues, based on his fieldwork in Xinjiang, how Uighurs became accustomed to the opportunities of new technologies until they were suddenly caught in a trap.
  • James Verini at WIRED notes how the fighting around Mosul in the fall of ISIS could be called the first smartphone war.
  • National Observer looks at how Québec is so far leading Canada in the development of clean technologies, including vehicles.
  • VICE reports on how a Christian rock LP from the 1980s also hosted a Commodore 64 computer program.
  • Megan Molteni at WIRED looks at a new, more precise, CRISPR technique that could be used to fix perhaps most genetic diseases.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes a study suggesting the Milky Way Galaxy took many of its current satellite galaxies from another, smaller one.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly talks of the importance of having dreams.
  • Centauri Dreams shares a study explaining how the debris polluting the atmospheres of white dwarfs reveals much about exoplanet chemistry.
  • D-Brief notes that the intense radiation of Jupiter would not destroy potential traces of subsurface life on the surface of Europa.
  • Dangerous Minds looks at the strange musical career of Vader Abraham, fan of the Smurfs and of the Weepuls.
  • Aneesa Bodiat at JSTOR Daily writes about how the early Muslim woman of Haajar inspires her as a Muslim.
  • Erik Loomis at Lawyers, Guns and Money notes how an influx of American guns destabilizes Mexico.
  • The LRB Blog looks at the American abandonment of the Kurds of Syria.
  • Marginal Revolution notes how many mass protests are driven by consumer complaints.
  • The NYR Daily has an interview with EU chief Brexit negotiator Guy Verhofstadt, on the future of sovereignty.
  • Strange Company looks at the Dead Pig War between the US and the UK on San Juan Island in 1859.
  • Towleroad features the defense of Frank Ocean of his PrEP+ club night and the release of his new music.
  • Understanding Society looks at the sociology of norms.
  • Window on Eurasia suggests Russia and Ukraine each have an interest in the Donbass being a frozen conflict.
  • Arnold Zwicky looks at the weird masculinity of the pink jock.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • Bad Astronomer notes the latest news on interstellar comet 2/Borisov.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly emphasizes how every writer does need an editor.
  • Centauri Dreams notes how the gas giant GJ 3512 b, half the mass of Jupiter orbiting a red dwarf star closely, is an oddly massive exoplanet.
  • Gina Schouten at Crooked Timber looks at inter-generational clashes on parenting styles.
  • D-Brief looks at the methods of agriculture that could conceivably sustain a populous human colony on Mars.
  • Bruce Dorminey argues that we on Earth need something like Starfleet Academy, to help us advance into space.
  • Colby King at the Everyday Sociology Blog looks at how the socio-spatial perspective helps us understand the development of cities.
  • Russell Arben Fox at In Media Res listens to the Paul McCartney album Flaming Pie.
  • io9 looks at Proxima, a contemporary spaceflight film starring Eva Green.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at how the intense relationship between the US and Saudi Arabia began in, and reflected, the era of Jim Crow.
  • Language Hat notes a report suggesting that multilingualism helps ward off dementia.
  • Language Log takes issue with the names of the mascots of the 2022 Beijing Winter Olympics.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes the emergence of a ninth woman complaining about being harassed by Al Franken.
  • Marginal Revolution links to a new paper arguing that the Washington Consensus worked.
  • The NYR Daily shares an Aubrey Nolan cartoon illustrating the evacuation of war children in the United Kingdom during the Second World War.
  • At Out of Ambit, Diane Duane shares a nice collection of links for digital mapmakers.
  • The Planetary Society Blog looks at how the European Space Agency supports the cause of planetary defense.
  • Roads and Kingdoms interviews Kenyan writer Kevin Mwachiro at length.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel reports on how a mysterious fast radio burst helped illuminate an equally mysterious galactic halo.
  • Strange Company reports on the mysterious and unsolved death in 1936 of Canadian student Thomas Moss in an Oxfordshire hayrick.
  • Frank Jacobs at Strange Maps notes how Mount Etna is a surpassingly rare decipoint.
  • Understanding Society considers the thought of Kojève, after Hegel, on freedom.
  • Window on Eurasia looks at the falling numbers of Russians, and of state support for Russian language and culture, in independent Central Asia.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell looks at how individual consumer responses are much less effective than concerted collective action in triggering change.
  • Arnold Zwicky reports on some transgender fashion models.