A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘middle east

[NEWS] Five links about population in small centres: education, Ontario, Atlantic Canada

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  • Noah Smith at Bloomberg notes that universities, and other centres of higher education, can play a critical role in keeping small centres alive, in the US and elsewhere.
  • Michelle McQuigge notes that the northern Ontario town of Smooth Rock Falls has seen success attracting potential new residents with sales of land for cheap, for the Canadian Press.
  • Jessica Leeder tells the sad story about how the politics of a community radio station in Newfoundland’s Bell Island tore the community apart, over at The Globe and Mail.
  • CBC notes that the influx of Syrian refugees to Nova Scotia has reversed a trend of population decline. Will it last? More here.
  • The government of Prince Edward Island has an ambitious strategy to boost the Island’s population, through immigration, to 160 thousand by 2022. More here.
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[NEWS] Five notes on cultural change: Jordan Peterson, blogging under ISIS, India, Canadian drama

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  • NOW Toronto observes that U of T professor Jordan Peterson is directly threatening other members of the academic community to which he belongs.
  • VICE reports on how an Iraqi in Mosul managed to maintain an ISIS-critical blog while under ISIS rule.
  • Mihir Sharma notes, for Bloomberg View, that Indian education needs to be vastly improved if India is to take off.
  • This exploration of the reasons why Canadian playwrights are big in Japan is fascinating. (Translator Tohoshi Yoshihara is a huge fan.) NOW Toronto explores.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

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  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes that our first confirmed extrasolar visitor has been named, I/U2017 U1.
  • Centauri Dreams examines the dynamics allowing Enceladus to keep its subsurface water ocean.
  • Crooked Timber reacts to the alarming rift opening up between Saudi Arabia and its Shi’ite neighbours, including Lebanon and Iran.
  • D-Brief notes that the New Horizons team planners are seeking a new name for their next target, (486958) 2014 MU69.
  • Dangerous Minds takes a look at some of the greeting cards designed for American Greetings by Robert Crumb.
  • Hornet Stories notes the rise of explicitly homophobic and transphobic ideologues in Paraguay, and its implications for wider South America.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes growing Democratic strength in Washington State.
  • The Map Room Blog shares a New York Times map of the Virginia election for governor.
  • The NYR Daily looks how the brutally quick shutdown of DNAInfo and the Gothamist network reflects the generally parlous state of journalism (among other things).
  • Roads and Kingdoms takes a look at the humble momo, a breakfast food in (among other places) Bhutan.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel explains why quark fusion can never be a potent energy source.
  • Understanding Society celebrates its tenth anniversary.
  • Window on Eurasia notes the disinterest of most Russians in personally costly revolutionary actions.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

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  • Anthrodendum takes an extended look at sexual harassment in anthropology, drawing from #metoo.
  • Crooked Timber considers the so-called Amazon-Facebook-Google “trinet” set to take over from the free Internet.
  • Dead Things considers if the Americas could have been populated by early migration down the coast, the “kelp route”.
  • Samuel Hatmaker’s Lego portrait of RuPaul is profiled in Hornet Stories.
  • Language Hat considers an untranslatable poem of Pasternak.
  • Language Log notes how Manafort’s legal team confused “Cyprus” with “cypress”.
  • Robert Farley of Lawyers, Guns and Money shares an interview of his with the Indian consul-general in Houston on the nature of the latter’s work.
  • Tyler Cowen of Marginal Revolution argues blaming Facebook for electoral manipulation overlooks the responsibility of individual voters.
  • The NYR Daily notes that the Kurds have paid the price for Trump’s dealings with Iran.
  • Roads and Kingdoms explores the surprisingly living Central Cemetery of Vienna.
  • Drew Rowsome explores the literature of horror writer Robert Sherman.
  • Towleroad notes BPM, the Oscar-contending French film about the AIDS crisis in that country.
  • Window on Eurasia notes the oddness of a pledge by China to fight illegal migration by Chinese into Russia.

[URBAN NOTE] Four notes around the world: New York City, Saudi Arabia, Hong Kong, Mexico City

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  • Bloomberg notes global warming can expose New York City to heightened flood risks every five years, not every 500.
  • Saudi Arabia, Bloomberg notes, plans to build a new city from scratch.
  • VICE notes that Hong Kong, with its dear real estate, is running out of space for its dead.
  • Spacing looks at how Mexico City is expanding its cycling infrastructure as part of its bid for world status.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait looks at enormous, explosive Wolf-Rayet stars, and at WR 124 in particular.
  • The Big Picture shares heart-rending photos of Rohingya refugees fleeing Burma.
  • Centauri Dreams considers the potential of near-future robotic asteroid mining.
  • D-Brief notes the discovery of vast cave systems on the Moon, potential homes for settlers.
  • Hornet Stories exposes young children to Madonna’s hit songs and videos of the 1980s. She still has it.
  • Inkfish notes that a beluga raised in captivity among dolphins has picked up elements of their speech.
  • Language Hat notes a dubious claim that a stelae containing Luwian hieroglyphic script, from ancient Anatolia, has been translated.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money considers the question of preserving brutalist buildings.
  • The LRB Blog considers how Brexit, intended to enhance British sovereignty and power, will weaken both.
  • The Map Room Blog notes that the moons and planets of the solar system have been added to Google Maps.
  • The NYR Daily considers how the Burmese government is carefully creating a case for Rohingya genocide.
  • The Power and Money’s Noel Maurer concludes, regretfully, that the market for suborbital travel is just not there.
  • Visiting a shrimp festival in Louisiana, Roads and Kingdoms considers how the fisheries work with the oil industry (or not).
  • Towleroad reports on the apparent abduction in Chechnya of singer Zelimkhan Bakayev, part of the anti-gay pogrom there.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that rebuilding Kaliningrad as a Russian military outpost will be expensive.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to a paper suggesting exoplanet transits could start a galactic communications network.
  • The Everyday Sociology Blog looks at the connections between eating and identity.
  • The Frailest Thing’s Michael Sacasas looks at the need for a critical study of the relationship between technology and democracy.
  • Language Hat notes how nationalism split Hindustani into separate Hindi and Urdu languages.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money reflects on the grim outlook in Somalia after the terrible recent Mogadishu bombing.
  • Marginal Revolution’s Tyler Cowen thinks Trump’s decertification of the Iran deal is a bad idea.
  • The Map Room Blog links to an article imagining a counter-mapping of the Amazon by indigenous peoples.
  • Neuroskeptic considers the possibility of Parkinson’s being a prion disease, somewhat like mad cow disease.
  • The NYR Daily notes that a Brexit driven by a perceived need to take back control will not meet that need, at all.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw looks at the problem Sydney faces as it booms.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer looks at the extent to which an independent Catalonia would be ravaged economically by a non-negotiated secession.
  • Peter Watts tells the sad story of an encounter between Toronto police and a homeless man he knows.
  • Window on Eurasia notes a Sakhalin bridge, like a Crimea bridge, may not come off because of Russian weakness.