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Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘middle east

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

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  • Centauri Dreams considers the idea of uploading a digital “Golden Record” into the memory of New Horizons.
  • Crooked Timber takes a look at American legal writer (and judge) Richard Posner’s embrace of pragmatism. What does it mean?
  • D-Brief notes the rapid melting of the glaciers that feed the major rivers of Asia.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to a paper considering ways to detect planets in orbit of red giants.
  • The LRB Blog considers the potential for political tumult in Saudi Arabia, in the wake of arrests and rumours.
  • The Map Room Blog links to a new gravity map of Mars, revealing the crust of that world to be less dense and more variable than thought.
  • The NYR Daily looks at the South China Sea dispute in the wake of Indonesia’s newly restated claims.
  • Roads and Kingdoms looks at Philadelphia’s seasonal cookie–spiced wafer–wars.
  • Drew Rowsome is a big fan of the movie adaptation of It.
  • Window on Eurasia suggests that, for want of better options, the Donbas republics’ people might return to Ukraine.
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[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

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  • Acts of Minor Treason’s Andrew Barton reacts to the series premiere of Orville, finding it oddly retrograde and unoriginal.
  • Centauri Dreams shares Larry Klaes’ article considering the impact of the 1956 classic Forbidden Planet on science and science fiction alike.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to a paper wondering if it is by chance that Earth orbits a yellow dwarf, not a dimmer star.
  • Drone360 shares a stunning video of a drone flying into Hurricane Irma.
  • Hornet Stories celebrates the 10th anniversary of Chris Crocker’s “Leave Britney Alone!” video. (It was important.)
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money wonders if 16 years are long enough to let people move beyond taboo images, like those of the jumpers.
  • The LRB Blog takes a look at the young Dreamers, students, who have been left scrambling by the repeal of DACA.
  • The Map Room Blog notes how a Québec plan to name islands in the north created by hydro flooding after literature got complicated by issues of ethnicity and language.
  • Marginal Revolution notes the rise of internal tourism in China, and soon, of Chinese tourists in the wider world.
  • The NYR Daily has an interview arguing that the tendency to make consciousness aphysical or inexplicable is harmful to proper study.
  • Roads and Kingdoms has a brief account of a good experience with Indonesian wine.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell links to five reports about Syria. They are grim reading.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

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  • Anthrodendum considers what, exactly, anthropology majors can do job-wise with their degrees. Interesting ideas.
  • Centauri Dreams considers the possible origins of cometary organics in deep space.
  • Hornet Stories talks of anti-immigrant Americans with immigrant ancestors who skirted relevant laws themselves, like Donald Trump.
  • Language Hat considers byssus, an exotic ancient textile and a word with a complex history.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money looks at how the potential for disaster in Florida is worsened by poor planning.
  • The LRB Blog looks at the sad intersection of war, xenophobia, and rising rates of polio in Pakistan (and elsewhere).
  • The Map Room Blog notes an interactive map-related play still showing at the Halifax Fringe, Cartography.
  • The NYR Daily notes a high-profile corruption trial of a former government minister in Moscow.
  • The Planetary Society Blog shares Paul Schenk’s story about how he interned at JPL in 1979 for the Voyager 2 flyby.
  • Roads and Kingdoms looks at the search by a Brazilian man for caves in the south of that country.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy asks some interesting questions about the mechanics of Settlers of Catan.
  • At Whatever, John Scalzi remembers Jerry Pournelle.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how Russia is strongly opposed to any Circassian return to their ancestral homeland.

[NEWS] Four links about science and the future: Caananites, iPod, birding, e-residency

  • The New York Times is but one news source to observe the findings of archeologists and geneticists that the Canaanites were not slaughtered. Was the claimed Biblical genocide a matter of thwarted wish-fulfillment?
  • At Wired, David Pierce mourns the standalone iPod, an innovative music-changing technology in its time now being phased out.
  • Catherine McIntyre at MacLean’s describes how birding is becoming hip among young urbanites, in Toronto and across Canada.
  • Open Democracy looks at how Estonia is pioneering e-residency and virtual citizenship schemes.

[ISL] Four links on the Island, from LGBTQ pride to Syrian refugees to a possible U-Boat off Tignish

  • CBC reports on a straight Summerside couple who are painting rainbows around the Island’s second city against hate.
  • Maureen Coulter writes in The Guardian about Pride week in Charlottetown, the start coinciding with my visit. I can scarcely imagine.
  • Katerina Georgieva notes the coming one-year anniversary of the arrival of the Abdulhey family from Syria on PEI.
  • Was a U-Boat sunk off the Island coast, by Tignish, in 1943? Millicent McKay reports on the latest search.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait shares stunning photos of Jupiter and its moons taken from the Earth.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly talks about the life lessons she has taken from her recent extended trip in Europe.
  • Centauri Dreams notes the testing, by a European team, of the InflateSail intended to remove debris from Earth orbit.
  • Crooked Timber takes a look at the historically messy interactions between democratic governance and economic policy.
  • Dangerous Minds notes that Trump is making use of LGBT people as pawns. I wish the conclusion was less frighteningly convincing.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to a paper on a recent search for exomoons, including the possible detection of Kepler 1625b I.
  • The Frailest Thing’s Michael Sacasas considers what it means for a parent to look at their child in an era of technologically mediated vision.
  • In Medias Res’ Russell Arben Fox notes, from his personal experience, how Donald Trump just does not get scouting.
  • Language Log shares a report of how a Chinese man with synesthesia sees written language.
  • The LRB Blog notes how Isaiah Berlin predicted the Saudi-American alliance back in 1945.
  • Marginal Revolution notes a recent decline in regional income convergence in the United States. Causes?
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer notes the politics that went into costly subway design changes in Mexico City. (Line 12 does look nice.)
  • Strange Company notes the romance of the grave of the Mysterious Stranger in Alexandria, Virginia. Who was she?
  • Unicorn Booty notes that Jinks Monsoon will be voicing a Steven Universe character and is out as non-gendered.
  • Window on Eurasia notes growing controversy in Kyrgyzstan over a switch in Kyrgyz alphabets from Cyrillic to Latin.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes a new study suggesting some hypervelocity stars were ejected from the Large Magellanic Cloud.
  • Crooked Timber’s John Holbo wonders how else Trump can transgress the norms of the presidency.
  • The Crux notes the exceptional hardiness of the tardigrade. These forms of life might well outlive the sun.
  • Gizmodo notes the evidence for a recently frozen subsurface ocean on Pluto’s Charon.
  • Joe. My. God. notes the Israeli government’s effective, if confused, opposition to same-sex adoption.
  • Unicorn Booty looks at the significant impact RuPaul’s Drag Race has on music sales.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how Putin’s political allies have been having trouble coming up with a positive future.