A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘migration

[NEWS] Five links about population in small centres: education, Ontario, Atlantic Canada

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  • Noah Smith at Bloomberg notes that universities, and other centres of higher education, can play a critical role in keeping small centres alive, in the US and elsewhere.
  • Michelle McQuigge notes that the northern Ontario town of Smooth Rock Falls has seen success attracting potential new residents with sales of land for cheap, for the Canadian Press.
  • Jessica Leeder tells the sad story about how the politics of a community radio station in Newfoundland’s Bell Island tore the community apart, over at The Globe and Mail.
  • CBC notes that the influx of Syrian refugees to Nova Scotia has reversed a trend of population decline. Will it last? More here.
  • The government of Prince Edward Island has an ambitious strategy to boost the Island’s population, through immigration, to 160 thousand by 2022. More here.
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[BLOG] Some Sunday links

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  • blogTO shares a raft of photos from Toronto in the 1910s.
  • Daily JSTOR notes the profound democratic symbolism of the doughnut. Seriously.
  • D-Brief notes a contentious argument that organic agriculture could, if well-managed, be productive enough to feed the population of the world.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to a study of the complex environment of dust and debris around young protostar L1527.
  • Far Outliers notes the central role of Hitler in avoiding the crushing of the BEF at Dunkirk. Apparently the British Empire and the Catholic Church were the two world forces he did not wish to crush.
  • Hornet Stories makes the perfectly obvious point that websites which collect photos of attractive guys taken without their consent are actually sketchy, legally and ethically. Why it has to be made, I don’t know.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money takes time from providing political coverage to share a recipe for a delicious-sounding slow-cooker corn/salmon/bacon chowder.
  • The Map Room Blog notes the updated looks of Google Maps.
  • The NYR Daily examines the ad hoc and DIY nature of disaster relief on Puerto Rico post-Maria.
  • Seriously Science notes a paper suggesting that bearded men tend to be more sexist than non-bearded men.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel cautions against a tendency to pick up on astronomical mysteries as proof of dark matter’s existence.
  • Window on Eurasia suggests that wealthy Russians are quietly shifting their wealth and investing in property in Europe.
  • Arnold Zwicky notes a new effort to employ the principles of Basic English, conveying as much meaning as possible with as few worlds as imaginable.

[META] Six new blogs on the blogroll

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I will be doing the hard work of installing these six blogs on my blogroll later this weekend. For now, suffice it to say that these six blogs, still-extant islands in a blogosphere in a state of transformation, are going to be the last I’ll be adding for some time. It can be hard to keep up with them all.

  • Daily JSTOR is the famed scholarly archive’s blog. This 1 November post, timed for Nanowrimo, sharing some inspiring quotes from writers about writing, is fun.
  • The blog by Lyman Stone, In a State of Migration, has great analyses of demographic issues in the United States and wider world. This recent post, looking at what it would take to–as the alt-right would wish–“make America white” and the enormous costs of this goal, is worth noting.
  • Information is Beautiful, by famed data journalist David McCandless has all sorts of fantastic infographics. I recommend this one, looking at the United Kingdom’s options re: Brexit.
  • The Chronicle of Higher Education’s blog Lingua Franca takes a look at language and writing. This recent post, analyzing the complexities and challenges of George Orwell’s thought on freedom of expression, is very good.
  • Noahpinion is the blog of Bloomberg writer Noah Smith. I quite liked this older essay, one noting that cyberpunk’s writers seem to have gotten the future, unlike other writers in other SF subgenres. Does rapid change lead to bad predictions?
  • Salmagundi is a blog by an anonymous gay Kentucky writer touching on the subjects of his life and more. The most recent post is this link to an essay by Bruce Snider, talking about the lack of rural gay poets.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

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  • Dangerous Minds shares some of the exotic space music of composer Pauline Anna Strom.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to a paper examining the effect of in-system super-Earth on asteroid impacts upon terrestrial planets.
  • Hornet Stories, for ones, notes that Cards Against Humanity has bought up a stretch along the US-Mexican border to prevent the construction of a border wall.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money reminds people–sad that it has to be done–that, even in Trump outposts like Johnstown in Pennsylvania where racism has replaced reason among too many, there still are good things in this and other like communities.
  • The LRB Blog considers the plight of British-Iranian Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe, whose plight in Iranian custody has been worsened by her government. What can be done for her?
  • Marginal Revolution notes how, in the early 20th century as in the early 21st century, substantial immigration to the US became politically controversial despite its benefits.
  • The NYR Daily takes a look at the art of Tove Jansson, beyond the Moomins.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer takes a look at the slow emergence of Canadian citizenship distinct from the British over the 20th century.
  • Roads and Kingdoms takes</u. a look at the grape-crashing of the vineyards of Oliver, British Columbia.
  • Peter Rukavina describes the origin of the theme music of CBC classic show The Friendly Giant in the 18th century English folk tune “Early One Morning.”
  • Seriously Science notes that oysters can apparently hear sound.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that the autonomy enjoyed by Puerto Rico was one source of inspiration for the nationalists of Tatarstan in the early 1990s.

[ISL] Four islands links: Cyprus and Northern Ireland, Fiji, Cayman Islands, New Brunswick

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  • Some think the Green Line in Cyprus can be a suitable model for post-Brexit Northern Ireland. So depressing. European think-tank Brughel reports.
  • Fiji is already starting to see an influx of migrants/refugees from lower-lying Pacific island countries. DW reports.
  • The Queen making use of Cayman Islands tax shelters only makes sense. She is queen there, after all. Open Democracy reports.
  • Global News notes that a Qu├ębec family has put up for sale a private island in New Brunswick, on the Bay of Fundy.

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

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  • Centauri Dreams notes the remarkably complex system of Proxima Centauri, with multiple belts and more possible planets, as does D-Brief.
  • D-Brief notes the discovery of a new sort of fusion reactions, involving not atoms but quarks.
  • Hornet Stories notes a new acoustic cover of the Kinky Boots song “Not My Father’s Son.”
  • Language Hat takes a brief look at Cyrillic, since the Soviet era written in Cyrillic script.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes how the Trump Administration is unconcerned by the latest report regarding catastrophic climate change.
  • The LRB Blog notes how Armenia and Armenians remember past genocides and current refugee flows.
  • The Planetary Society Blog notes the further extension of the Dawn mission at Ceres.
  • Drew Rowsome shares some of Stephen King’s tips for aspiring writers.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes how some long-exposure Hubble photographs of galaxies picked up nearby asteroids.
  • John Scalzi shares his cover of “Rocket Man”.
  • Window on Eurasia wonders if ISIS is spreading into Russia via migrant workers from Central Asia.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

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  • Anthrodendum takes an extended look at sexual harassment in anthropology, drawing from #metoo.
  • Crooked Timber considers the so-called Amazon-Facebook-Google “trinet” set to take over from the free Internet.
  • Dead Things considers if the Americas could have been populated by early migration down the coast, the “kelp route”.
  • Samuel Hatmaker’s Lego portrait of RuPaul is profiled in Hornet Stories.
  • Language Hat considers an untranslatable poem of Pasternak.
  • Language Log notes how Manafort’s legal team confused “Cyprus” with “cypress”.
  • Robert Farley of Lawyers, Guns and Money shares an interview of his with the Indian consul-general in Houston on the nature of the latter’s work.
  • Tyler Cowen of Marginal Revolution argues blaming Facebook for electoral manipulation overlooks the responsibility of individual voters.
  • The NYR Daily notes that the Kurds have paid the price for Trump’s dealings with Iran.
  • Roads and Kingdoms explores the surprisingly living Central Cemetery of Vienna.
  • Drew Rowsome explores the literature of horror writer Robert Sherman.
  • Towleroad notes BPM, the Oscar-contending French film about the AIDS crisis in that country.
  • Window on Eurasia notes the oddness of a pledge by China to fight illegal migration by Chinese into Russia.