A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘migration

[ISL] Three notes on Prince Edward Island, changing and otherwise

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  • CBC Prince Edward Island notes that, although down from its 1999 peak, PEI is still Canada’s top potato producer.
  • Strong demand and limited supply means that the Island’s real estate market is tight, with rising prices. CBC Prince Edward Island reports.
  • Meagan Campbell writes in MacLean’s about two of the Island’s newest migrant groups, Amish from Ontario and Buddhist monks from East Asia.

[URBAN NOTE] Seven Toronto links, from condo conversions to a cat park to unsafe beaches

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  • John Michael McGrath argues at TVO that leaving Toronto for Ontario cities with cheaper housing misses the issue of jobs. For starters.
  • Michelle McQuigge looks at how the CNIB is helping make Yonge and St. Clair accessible to the blind.
  • In The Globe and Mail, Erik Heinrich looks at how a mid-rise office tower at 1133 Yonge Street is being transformed into condos.
  • The Toronto Star reports that the condo/hotel tower at 325 Bay Street no longer bears the name of Trump. Toronto is free!
  • The end of the Palace Arms rooming house at King and Strachan, Christian Controneo notes at Torontoist, must be seen as terrible for the people who live there.
  • blogTO notes that E. Coli levels on mainland Toronto beaches make them unsafe for swimmers. No lake water this year!
  • blogTO notes that Montréal architect Claude Cormier, designer of HTO and Berczy, will next do a cat-themed park.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

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  • James Bow shares his story of how he met famed Canadian kid’s author Gordon Korman.
  • Paul Drye has sales on this month for his two books, space race WI book False Steps and his first, Passing Strangeness.
  • Far Outliers’ Joel notes two overlooked episodes of migration in Canada, of Hawaiians in British Columbia and Canadian exiles in Australia.
  • The Great Grey Bridge’s Philip Turner shared, again, his personal photo essay about his links to and love of Canada.
  • Language Hat looks at the potentially Australian slang phrase “good on you” (pronounced “good onya”, apparently).
  • Language Hat looks at claims that translation and grammar complicate the meaning of the text authorizing the handover of Hong Kong to China.
  • The LRB Blog announces that their #readeverywhere photo contest is up and running for July!
  • Cheri Lucas Rowlands shares a gorgeous photo essay of her trip to Chania, on Crete.
  • Unicorn Booty has an interesting essay looking at the barriers to membership imposed by gay culture on newly-out members of the community.
  • Window on Eurasia looks at the cost of the Russian war in Ukraine and argues that the consequences of a crash now would be worse than in 1998.

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

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  • Language Log argues that, despite a lack of official or public support, Cantonese remains the dominant language of Hong Kong.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money makes the case for the global relevance of the Cranberries’ song “Zombie.”
  • Marginal Revolution seems to like the end results of Canada’s immigration system.
  • The NYR Daily notes that, even after ISIS, Iraq will be beset by multiple ethnoreligious crises.
  • Out There’s Corey S. Powell interviews an astronomer about the very strange Przybylski’s Star, rich in rare radioactive elements.
  • Savage Minds considers the decolonization of anthropology in the context of Iraq.
  • Arnold Zwicky considers the surprisingly deep historical resonance of the loon in Canada.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

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  • Bad Astronomy’s Phil Plait talks about some new observations of the dusty ring of Fomalhaut.
  • Centauri Dreams reports on a new theory about the magnetic fields of Uranus.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money reports on a new Lin-Manuel Miranda mixtape referencing immigration, including the refugee crisis.
  • The LRB Blog reports on the terrible psychological toll of Grenfell Tower for the survivors, including the very young.
  • Neuroskeptic wonders if psychology papers might give criminals ideas.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy reports on a Canadian court ruling ordering Google to remove search results worldwide.
  • Window on Eurasia argues Russia must take care not to undermine protection for non-Russian languages in the republics, and describes a new total mobilization policy in Belarus possibly aimed against Russia.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

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  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly considers the various challenges of being an independent person.
  • Centauri Dreams considers the possibility of a Mars-mass planet in the Kuiper belt.
  • Dangerous Minds notes how the 5Pointz warehouse of NYC, once a graffiti hotspot, has been turned into a condo complex that at best evokes that artistic past.
  • Language Log explores the etymology of “sang”, a descriptor of a Chinese subculture of dispirited youths.
  • The LRB Blog reports on a Border Patrol raid on the No More Deaths encampment in Arizona, a camp that helps save migrant lives in the desert.
  • The Strange Company blogs about the mysterious 1829 disappearance of Judge John Ten Eyck Lansing from New York City.
  • Unicorn Booty describes three gay Muslim immigrants terrified of the implications of President Trump.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy considers pros and cons to the idea of religious arbitration.
  • Window on Eurasia suggests that the Qatar crisis is worsening Sunni/Shia tensions among the Muslims of Russia.

[URBAN NOTE] Four notes about the past and future of queer life in a dynamic Toronto

  • In the Toronto Star, Emma Teitel wonders how long Church and Wellesley will last as a hub as the queer community develops and migrates away.
  • Trevor Corkum, also in the Toronto Star, explores the important role of the Glad Day Bookshop in modern Toronto’s gay and literary scenes.
  • Brian Bradley tells the story of Craig Russell, an early drag queen who became a star and started a still-living cultural tradition of drag performances in Toronto.
  • In NOW Toronto, Vaughn Grey tells the story of how he successfully escaped Jamaica to claim refugee status in Toronto.