A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘migration

[URBAN NOTE] TTC Line 1, Dufferin Street, Bloordale, #TheManWhoSoldParkdale, PR voting

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  • blogTO notes a closure this weekend of Line 1 between St. Clair and Lawrence for Metrolinx construction. Still, at least their post uses my photo!
  • Urban Toronto notes that, the studios at 390 through 444 Dufferin Street being demolished, new construction is begin. I remember those studios from when I first moved to Toronto.
  • Urban Toronto looks at the latest revision to plans to redevelop the southwest corner of Bloor and Dufferin, one intended to install a more human scale to the streetscape and skyline.
  • NOW Toronto takes an extended look at the #TheManWhoSoldParkdale campaign against gentrification in Parkdale.
  • CBC shares the argument in favour of giving permanent residents voting rights in municipal elections in the City of Toronto.
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[URBAN NOTE] Five notes about cities: Arctic, floating, cemeteries, wildlife, immigrants

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  • Wired noted how Arctic cities were facing significant problems from melting permafrost, and how they were trying to deal with this threat.
  • CityLab notes the ever-popular idea of a floating city, riding the waves.
  • Atlas Obscura notes, unsurprisingly, that some cemeteries in the United States were used as parks. Why not? These can be lovely green spaces. Just look at Toronto’s Mount Pleasant and Prospect cemeteries.
  • In a feature on Menno Schilthuizen’s Darwin Comes to Town, Simon Worrall at National Geographic looks at the many and varied ways wildlife can adapt to city life.
  • Melissa Byrnes, at Lawyers, Guns and Money, noted how Trump’s rhetoric of ICE “liberating” American communities echoed ways in which French authorities in the Algerian war militarized immigrant neighbourhoods.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

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  • Anthro{dendum}’s Adam Fish looks at the phenomenon of permissionless innovation as part of a call for better regulation.
  • James Bow shares excerpts from his latest book, The Cloud Riders.
  • Bruce Dorminey notes how data from Voyager 1’s cosmic ray detectors has been used to study dark matter.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money begins a dissection of what Roe vs Wade meant, and means, for abortion in the United States, and what its overturn might do.
  • Ilan Stavans, writing for Lingua Franca at the Chronicle, considers the languages of the World Cup. The prominence of Spanish in the United States is particularly notable.
  • The LRB Blog gathers together articles referencing the now-departed Boris Johnson. What a man.
  • The Map Room Blog reports/u> on Matthew Blackett’s remarkably intricate transit map of Canada.
  • Alex Tabarrok at Marginal Revolution links to a study from Nature exploring how shifts in the definition of concepts like racism and sexism means that, even as many of the grossest forms disappear, racism and sexism continue to be recognized if in more minute form.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel looks at how a Japanese experiment aimed at measuring proton decay ended up inaugurating the era of neutrino astronomy, thanks to SN1987A.
  • Window on Eurasia reports on how a Russian proposal to resettle Afrikaner farmers from South Africa to the North Caucasus (!) is, unsurprisingly, meeting with resistance from local populations, including non-Russian ones.
  • Linguist Arnold Zwicky takes a look at how, exactly, one learns to use the F word.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

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  • Bad Astronomy notes the discovery of a distant exoplanet, orbiting subgiant EPIC248847494, with an orbit ten years long.
  • Centauri Dreams reports on the latest discoveries regarding Ceres’ Occator Crater, a place with a cryovolcanic past.
  • D-Brief notes the discovery of a brilliant early galaxy, the brightest so far found, P352-15.
  • Dangerous Minds shares an extended interview with Françoise Hardy.
  • Far Outliers notes how, during the later Cold War, cash-desperate Soviet bloc governments allowed hopeful emigrants for countries in the West to depart only if these governments paid a ransom for them.
  • Hornet Stories has a nice feature on Enemies of Dorothy, a LGBT sketch comedy group with a political edge. I saw some of their clips; I’m following them.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at some of the features uniting celebratory music festival Coachella with Saturnalia, fitting the former into an ancient tradition.
  • Language Hat reports on researchers studying the development of emojis. Are they becoming components of a communications system with stable meanings?
  • Marginal Revolution reports on how mobile money is becoming a dominant element in the economy of Somaliland.
  • Justine Petrone at North reports on the things that were, and were not, revealed about his family’s ancestry through DNA testing.
  • Melissa Chadburn writes at the NYR Daily about the food she ate growing up as a poor child, and its meaning for her then and now in a time of growing inequality.
  • Roads and Kingdoms tells of a woman’s experience drinking samsu, a clear rice liqueur, in Malacca.
  • Drew Rowsome raves over David Kingston Yeh’s debut novel, the queer Toronto-themed The Boy at the Edge of the World.
  • Window on Eurasia quotes a Russian observer who suggests that Trump’s attempt to disrupt the European Union, even if successful, might simply help make Germany into a strategic competitor to the United States (with benefits for other powers).

[BLOG] Some Monday links

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  • At Anthro{dendum}, Daniel Miller writes about how some of the food he cooks evokes his history in Cuba-influenced Tampa.
  • Bad Astronomer notes an astonishingly high-resolution image of protoplanet Vesta taken from the Earth.
  • The Big Picture shares photos of the Kakuma refugee camp, in Kenya.
  • Centauri Dreams notes one proposal to help extend the life of a Type III civilization in the Milky Way Galaxy by importing stars from outside of the local group.
  • Crooked Timber’s Corey Robin talks about changing minds in politics, inspired by the success of Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez.
  • Dangerous Minds shares the 1978 BBC documentary on surrealism, Europe After the Rain.
  • Far Outliers shares the third part of a summary of an article on African and Japanese mercenaries in Asia.
  • Hornet Stories reports on the regret of Buffy showrunner Martin Noxon that her show killed off Tara. (I agree: I liked her.)
  • At In Medias Res, Russell Arben Fox wonders what American farmers–by extension, perhaps, other farmers in other high-income societies–want. With their entire culture being undermine, what can they hope for?
  • Joe. My. God. notes how far-right groups in Europe are increasingly welcoming lesbian, gay, and bisexual members. (Not so much trans people, it seems.)
  • JSTOR Daily reports on the obvious utility of the humble beaver (in its North American homelands, at least).
  • Language Log considers the politics of the national language policy of China.
  • This Language Hat articlereporting on a conference on xenolinguistics, and the discussion in the comments, is fascinating. What can we hope to learn about non-human language? What will it have, and have not, in common?
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer considers the slow corruption of independent institutions in Mexico that may occur under the presidency of AMLO.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes that, while we have not found life on Enceladus, we have found indicators of a world that could support life.
  • Window on Eurasia wonders if Russia is increasingly at risk of being displaced in Central Asia by a dynamic Kazakhstan.

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

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Many things accumulated after a pause of a couple of months. Here are some of the best links to come about in this time.

  • Anthrodendum considers the issue of the security, or not, of cloud data storage used by anthropologists.
  • Architectuul takes a look at the very complex history of urban planning and architecture in the city of Skopje, linked to issues of disaster and identity.
  • Centauri Dreams features an essay by Ioannis Kokkidinis, examining the nature of the lunar settlement of Artemis in Andy Weir’s novel of the same. What is it?
  • Crux notes the possibility that human organs for transplant might one day soon be grown to order.
  • D-Brief notes evidence that extrasolar visitor ‘Oumuamua is actually more like a comet than an asteroid.
  • Bruce Dorminey makes the sensible argument that plans for colonizing Mars have to wait until we save Earth. (I myself have always thought the sort of environmental engineering necessary for Mars would be developed from techniques used on Earth.)
  • The Everyday Sociology Blog took an interesting look at the relationship between hobbies and work.
  • Far Outliers looks at how, in the belle époque, different European empires took different attitudes towards the emigration of their subjects depending on their ethnicity. (Russia was happy to be rid of Jews, while Hungary encouraged non-Magyars to leave.)
  • The Finger Post shares some photos taken by the author on a trip to the city of Granada, in Nicaragua.
  • The Frailest Thing’s L.M. Sacasas makes an interesting argument as to the extent to which modern technology creates a new sense of self-consciousness in individuals.
  • Inkfish suggests that the bowhead whale has a more impressive repertoire of music–of song, at least–than the fabled humpback.
  • Information is Beautiful has a wonderful illustration of the Drake Equation.
  • JSTOR Daily takes a look at the American women who tried to prevent the Trail of Tears.
  • Language Hat takes a look at the diversity of Slovene dialects, this diversity perhaps reflecting the stability of the Slovene-inhabited territories over centuries.
  • Language Log considers the future of the Cantonese language in Hong Kong, faced with pressure from China.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes how negatively disruptive a withdrawal of American forces from Germany would be for the United States and its position in the world.
  • Lingua Franca, at the Chronicle, notes the usefulness of the term “Latinx”.
  • The LRB Blog reports on the restoration of a late 19th century Japanese-style garden in Britain.
  • The New APPS Blog considers the ways in which Facebook, through the power of big data, can help commodify personal likes.
  • Neuroskeptic reports on the use of ayahusasca as an anti-depressant. Can it work?
  • Justin Petrone, attending a Nordic scientific conference in Iceland to which Estonia was invited, talks about the frontiers of Nordic identity.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw writes about what it is to be a literary historian.
  • Drew Rowsome praises Dylan Jones’ new biographical collection of interviews with the intimates of David Bowie.
  • Peter Rukavina shares an old Guardian article from 1993, describing and showing the first webserver on Prince Edward Island.
  • Seriously Science notes the potential contagiousness of parrot laughter.
  • Understanding Society’s Daniel Little t.com/2018/06/shakespeare-on-tyranny.htmltakes a look at the new Stephen Greenblatt book, Shakespeare on Power, about Shakespeare’s perspectives on tyranny.
  • Window on Eurasia shares speculation as to what might happen if relations between Russia and Kazakhstan broke down.
  • Worthwhile Canadian Initiative noticed, before the election, the serious fiscal challenges facing Ontario.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell points out that creating a national ID database in the UK without issuing actual cards would be a nightmare.
  • Arnold Zwicky reports on a strand of his Swiss family’s history found in a Paris building.

[URBAN NOTE] Five city links: Edmonton, Vancouver, St. George, Kanepi, Moscow

  • The City of Edmonton is considering the idea of intentionally creating a beach for sun-seekers on the North Saskatchewan River after last year’s happy accident. Global News reports.
  • There is controversy in Vancouver over the idea of investor immigrants gaining voting rights in the city. Global News reports</u..
  • The Utah conurbation of St. George faces real problems of water scarcity. CityLab reports.
  • The Estonian municipality of Kanepi has made the leaf of the cannabis plant its logo. CityLab reports.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at the symbolism behind the vast and impressive Moscow subway system, here.