A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘moldova

[URBAN NOTE] Five cities links: Hamilton, Detroit, Luxembourg, Lisbon, Comrat

  • Mark McNeil at the Hamilton Spectator notes that real estate prices in Hamilton, often thought of as Toronto’s less expensive bedroom community, are also rising very quickly.
  • The VICE article takes a look at the man who created Detroit’s African Bead Museum.
  • The former red-light district of Luxembourg City is also maneuvering to take advantage of the post-Brexit resettlement of Europeans financiers. Bloomberg reports.
  • Architectuul looks at how architects in Lisbon are trying to take advantage of their changing city, to help make it more accessible to all.
  • The Guardian has a photo essay focusing on Comrat, a decidedly Soviet-influenced city that is the capital of the autonomous region of Gagauzia, in Moldova.
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[BLOG] Some Sunday links

  • Crooked Timber seeks advice for academics trying to publish general-interest books.
  • The Frailest Thing’s Michael Sacasas considers the extent, and the way, in which technological change can outstrip the ability of cultures and institutions to manage this change.
  • Hornet Stories notes the many ways in which the Trump Presidency is proving to be terrible for HIV-positive people around the world.
  • Sara Jaffe at JSTOR Daily explores the concept of queer time. What is time like for queer people if the traditional markers of adulthood–marriage, children, and so on–are unavailable? How do they think of life stages?
  • Language Log looks at the complexities of language in Hong Kong under Chinese rule.
  • Drew Rowsome reports on the latest theatre piece of Jordan Tannahill, Declarations.
  • Window on Eurasia reports on declining flows of migrants from elsewhere in the former Soviet Union to Russia.

[NEWS] Five LGBTQ links: London play, Cameroon refugee, leather, Transnistria, Indonesia

  • The school boards of London, it turns out, will now fund a play that features a gay student’s struggle to bring his date to a prom. CBC reports.
  • A woman from Cameroon claims–credibly, I think–that she will face persecution on the grounds of her sexual orientation if she is deported back to her homeland from British Columbia. Global News reports.
  • VICE reports on how one man is now finding acceptance and even welcome for people of colour in the leather scene, looking at his experiences in the recent Mid-Atlantic Leather weekend.
  • Katya Myachina reports on one documentary photographer’s efforts to document LGBTQ life in the Russian-dominated exclave of Transnistria, and the effect these photos and their display have had, over at Open Democracy.
  • The Jakarta Post notes that, while Indonesians are willing to accept their LGBTQ fellow citizens as citizens, they are strongly opposed to their exercise of civil and human rights.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

  • At Apostrophen, author ‘Nathan Smith shares some of his favourite LGBTQ reads from the past year.
  • At the Broadside Blog, Caitlin Kelly asks her readers where their deepest roots lie.
  • Missing persons blog Charley Ross celebrates its 11th anniversary.
  • At Crooked Timber, Corey Robin takes issue with some attitudes of Democrats post-Alabama, especially regarding African-American voters.
  • D-Brief notes that the icy rings of Saturn apparently influence that planet’s ionosphere.
  • Imageo shares satellite photos of the Thomas wildfire in California, apparently worsened by climate change.
  • JSTOR Daily links to ten beautiful poems of winter.
  • Language Hat links to an interesting-looking thesis examining non-Indo-European words in proto-Indo-European.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money takes a look at the underlying cycles leading to the speedy extinction of the passenger pigeon.
  • Lingua Franca takes a look at the modern use of the word “even” as a sort of intensifier. Tina Fey’s Mean Girls seems to be the source.
  • In the aftermath of the “Oumuamua scan, Marginal Revolution takes a look at the Fermi paradox. Where is everyone?
  • Neuroskeptic examines the universe of papers lacking citations, apparently only 10% of the total published.
  • Drew Rowsome shares some ideas for last-minute Christmas gifts, some naughty and some nice.
  • The blog Savage Minds is dead, long live its successor anthro(dendum)!
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel shows readers ways they can pick up traces of the quantum universe safely at home.
  • Towleroad has a queer take on the new Star Wars. (No spoilers, please–I think there are spoilers in the link.)
  • Window on Eurasia suggests language issues in Gaugazia, a Turkic enclave in Moldova, might trigger another bout of separatism there.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell has a new take on the cloud of bizarre videos that is #elsagate, introducing readers to the idea of algorithmic kitsch.

[NEWS] Three links from eastern Europe: Bulgaria and Macedonia, Moldova, Georgia and Abkhazia

  • Bulgaria and Macedonia have at last signed a treaty trying to put their contentious past behind them. Greece next?
  • The legacies of Stalinist deportations in Moldova continue to trouble this poor country.
  • The plight of the ethnic Georgians apparently permanently displaced from Georgia has been only muted by time.

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

  • blogTO notes that yesterday was a temperature record here in Toronto, reaching 12 degrees Celsius in the middle of February.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly writes about the pleasure of using old things.
  • Joe. My. God. notes the death of Roe v Wade plaintiff Norma McCorvey.
  • Language Hat notes that, apparently, dictionaries are hot again because their definitions are truthful.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money considers if the Trump Administration is but a mechanism for delivering Pence into power following an impeachment.
  • Steve Munro notes that Exhibition Loop has reopened for streetcars.
  • The NYRB Daily considers painter Elliott Green.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer notes that North Carolina’s slippage towards one-party state status is at least accompanied by less violence than the similar slippage following Reconstruction.
  • Window on Eurasia warns that Belarus is a prime candidate for Russian invasion if Lukashenko fails to keep control and notes the potential of the GUAM alliance to counter Russia.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

  • blogTO notes that a Toronto family known for its Christmas lights display may be forced to ratchet back by city inspectors.
  • Centauri Dreams notes the apparent discovery of Kuiper Belt objects around white dwarf WD 1425+540.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to one paper examining the possible orbital inclination of Proxima Centauri b, and points to another one speculating about upper limits to the masses of other exoplanets orbiting P_roxima Centauri.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money links to interviews with different historians noting how close the United States is to a scenario from 1930s Germany.
  • The LRB Blog notes that the actions of the American deep state to undermine elements of the Trump Administration seen as potentially threatening will certainly also undermine American democracy.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw looks at reasons for the continuing gap in life outcomes between indigenous and non-indigenous Australians.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer links to a paper looking at the effect of Huey Long’s populism on Louisiana’s economy, noting that he had little effect on the markets. This suggests that counting on the markets to reign in populists before the crash may be a mistake.
  • Strange Maps links to a map and history of the Gagauz of Moldova.
  • Torontoist looks at the continuing decline of live music venues in Toronto.
  • Towleroad notes the origins of Der Spiegel‘s cover art showing Trump with the severed head of lady liberty in a Cuban exile’s work.
  • Window on Eurasia notes differences between how Russians and Americans think about ethnicity and citizenship in their diverse societies.