A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘moon

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

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  • Centauri Dreams notes how the presence of methane in the subsurface oceans of Enceladus helps create a plausible dynamic for life there.
  • Crooked Timber notes another risk facing the UK in the era of Brexit, that of the United Kingdom’s already questionable data protection. How likely is it the EU will authorize data sharing with a business in an insecure third party?
  • D-Brief notes the conundrum posed by the profoundly corrosive dust of the Moon. How will future probes, never mind outposts, deal with it?
  • Cody Delistraty notes the profoundly problematic nature of the ethnographic museum in the post-imperial era. How can they adapt?
  • The LRB Blog notes the power of Stravinsky’s recently discovered Chant funebre.
  • Marginal Revolution notes how much Trump’s proposed steel tariffs now evoke Bush Jr’s like tariffs proposed a decade and a half ago.
  • Justin Petrone at north! writes about his visit to a strangely familiar southern Italy.
  • The NYR Daily takes a look at international brands careful to cater to the nationalist sympathies of China, in their advertising and elsewhere.
  • At the Planetary Society Blog, Jason Davis explains NASA’s detailed plan for returning people to the Moon.
  • Roads and Kingdoms tells the story of a burning-hot street hotpot in Chongqing.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel considers the idea of dark matter not being a particle.
  • Daniel Little at Understanding Society takes a look at the factors complicating the idea of consensus in a group.
  • John Scalzi celebrates the twentieth anniversary of his ownership of his scalzi com website.
  • Window on Eurasia wonders if Putin, with his boasting of advanced nuclear weapons, might start a 1980s-style arms race with the United States.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

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  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait looks at the oddly recognizable shape of the Horsehead Nebula, and the reasons for this.
  • Bruce Dorminey notes how exceptionally difficult it is for current astronomers to track the transformation of stardust into planets.
  • Gizmodo notes a new theory for the formation of the Moon suggesting that, instead of condensing from the debris left by a Mars-mass object’s collision with the Earth, it condensed along with the Earth from a synestia.
  • JSTOR Daily notes an Indian entrepreneur who developed a generator transforming rice husks into electrical power for an entire village.
  • Language Hat takes a critical look at some of the claims made in a recent article suggesting Icelandic is at risk of extinction.
  • Elaine Showalter writes at the NYR Daily about the power of feminist fantasy and science fiction literature.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes the apparent detection of the earliest-forming stars in the universe and their relationship with dark matter.
  • Strange Company notes the mysterious 1885 disappearance of New York City editor Samuel Stillman Conant. What happened to him? Why did he apparently abandon a happy life?
  • Whatever shares an idea for a fantasy universe from Tobias Buckell, imagining a world where magic has individual benefits but a terrible cost to the world at large. How would it be used?
  • Arnold Zwicky notes the death of Broadway and television star Nanette Fabray.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait takes a look at how contemporary lunar probes are prospecting for ice deposits on the dry Moon.
  • Centauri Dreams notes new models for the evolution of the orbit of the early Moon, and how this could well have influence the environment of the young Earth.
  • Crooked Timber takes issue with the idea that sponsoring women’s entrepreneurship, rooted in the belief that women are limited by their income, is enough to deal with deeper gender inequity.
  • D-Brief notes that a brain implant–specifically, one making use of deep brain stimulation–actually can significantly improve memory in implantees.
  • Gizmodo notes that extrasolar objects like ‘Oumuamua may well have played a significant role in interstellar panspermia, introducing life from one system to another.
  • At In A State of Migration, Lyman Stone does the work and finds out that the Amish are not, in fact, destined to eventually repopulate the US, that despite high fertility rates Amish fertility rates have consistently fell over time, influenced by external issues like the economy.
  • JSTOR Daily has a thought-provoking essay taking a look at the feedback loops between envy and social media. Does social media encourage too narrow a realm of human achievements to be valued?
  • Language Hat notes a new book, Giorgio Van Straten’s In Search of Lost Books, noting all those texts which once existed but have since gone missing.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money, noting the strongly negative reaction to Katie Roiphe’s essay in Harper’s against feminism, takes care to note that “disagreement” is not at all the same thing as “silencing”.
  • The NYR Daily looks at the many ways in which Sweden has been taken as a symbol for progressivism, and the reasons why some on the right look so obsessively for signs that it is failing.
  • At the Planetary Society Blog, Casey Dreier writes about the ways in which the Falcon Heavy, if it proves to be as inexpensive as promised, could revolutionize the exploration of (for instance) outer system ocean worlds like Europa and Enceladus.
  • Drew Rowsome quite likes Rumours, a performance of the famous Fleetwood Mac album of that name, at Toronto’s Coal Mine Theatre.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • Bruce Dorminey notes that a Brazilian startup hopes to send a Brazilian probe to lunar orbit, for astrobiological research.
  • Far Outliers notes the scale of the Western aid funneled to the Soviet Union through Murmansk in the Second World War.
  • Hornet Stories notes that Tarell Alvin McCraney, author of the play adapted into the stunning Moonlight, now has a new play set to premier on Brodway for the 2018-2019 season, Choir Boy.
  • JSTOR Daily notes the conspiracy behind the sabotage that led to the destruction in 1916 of a munitions stockpile on Black Tom Island, of German spies with Irish and Indian nationalists.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money is critical of the false equivalence in journalism that, in 2016, placed Trump on a level with Hillary.
  • The Map Room Blog notes that fitness app Strava can be used to detect the movements of soldiers (and others) around classified installations.
  • Marginal Revolution links to a New York Times profile of World Bank president Jim Young Kim.
  • Roads and Kingdoms talks about the joys of stuffed bread, paan, in Sri Lanka.
  • Towleroad notes that a Russian gay couple whose marriage in Denmark was briefly recognized in Russia are now being persecuted.
  • At Whatever, John Scalzi tells the story of his favourite teacher, Keith Johnson, and a man who happened to be gay. Would that all students could have been as lucky as Scalzi.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that the pronatalist policies of the Putin regime, which have basically cash subsidies to parents, have not reversed underlying trends towards population decline.

[PHOTO] Moon behind clouds above Pacific Avenue

The Moon was brilliant last night behind the clouds as I walked south down Pacific Avenue.

Moon behind clouds above Pacific Avenue #toronto #highparknorth #pacificavenue #moon #night #clouds #wires

Written by Randy McDonald

January 28, 2018 at 12:15 pm

[NEWS] Five science links: Great Lakes, cold in global warming, Orion, baboons, Alberta sparrow song

  • This CityLab post reviews a fantastic map book about the Great Lakes and their history.
  • An upcoming bout of Arctic chill in the United States (Canada, too) is connected to the ongoing process of climate change featuring global warming. Bloomberg explains.
  • National Geographic takes a look at upcoming testing for the United States’ new Orion program, a spacecraft that may take people back to the Moon.
  • 52 baboons escaped a Paris zoo, in so demonstrating their smarts. National Geographic explains.
  • Sparrows in the oilpatch, National Observer notes, are changing their song in order to compete with noise from machinery.

[PHOTO] Moon south on Yonge

Moon south on Yonge

Written by Randy McDonald

January 25, 2018 at 10:00 am