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Posts Tagged ‘moon

[LINK] “China Plans Lunar Far Side Landing by 2020”

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Universe Today’s Ken Kremer reports on China’s plans.

China aims to land a science probe and research rover on the far side of the Moon by 2020, say Chinese officials.

Chinese scientists plan to carry out the highly complex lunar landing mission using a near identical back up to the nations highly successful Chang’e-3 rover and lander – which touched down in December 2013.

If successful, China would become the first country to accomplish the history making task of a Lunar far side landing.

“The mission will be carried out by Chang’e-4, a backup probe for Chang’e-3, and is slated to be launched before 2020,” said Zou Yongliao from the moon exploration department under the Chinese Academy of Sciences, according to a recent report in China’s government owned Xinhua news agency.

Zou made the remarks at a deep-space exploration forum in China.

“China will be the first to complete the task if it is successful,” said Zou.

Written by Randy McDonald

September 24, 2015 at 9:14 pm

Posted in Science

Tagged with , , ,

[PHOTO] Moon over Spadina Avenue

Written by Randy McDonald

August 28, 2015 at 3:17 pm

[PHOTO] BMV in the evening, Bloor Street West

BMV in the evening #toronto #bloorstreetwest #theannex #bmv #books #moon #evening//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

The silver moon shines over BMV Books on Bloor in the late evening.

Written by Randy McDonald

August 27, 2015 at 3:09 pm

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

  • Gerry Canavan has a set of links up.
  • The Dragon’s Tales links to a video examining the nature–the mass, the orbit–of Theia, the Mars-side object that by impacting the early Earth created the Moon.
  • Geocurrents is back with a post criticizing the state-based model of geopolitics.
  • Joe. My. God. notes that anti-gay Americans are unhappy with Walmart’s opposition to pro-discrimination laws.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money supports the Norwegian model of rehabilitation in prison.
  • Marginal Revolution suggests that the debate on historical rates of social mobility across time and space is still raging.
  • Steve Munro proves with photos that the new streetcars displaced from Spadina by construction are on Harbourfront.
  • Savage Minds notes that two of its writers are moving on.
  • Spacing Toronto illustrates how, from the 1920s through to the 1980s, the idea of a stadium was popular.
  • Torontoist looks at Regent Park’s innovative education model.
  • Towleroad notes that the Tokyo ward of Shibuya is recognizing same-sex partnerships.
  • Transit Toronto notes that four generations of streetcars will be on display at the Beaches’ Easter parade.

  • Window on Eurasia suggests Russia is much worse off relative to its competitors than the Soviet Union was in the 1980s, notes the crackdown on Crimean Tatar media, and looks at the history and future of ethnic jokes in Russia.

[LINK] “Strategic Defense: Military Uses of the Moon & Asteroids (1983)”

At his fascinating Beyond Apollo blog at Wired, David S.F. Portree notes how in the 1980s, Cold War America began to consider the defense applications of the Moon and near-Earth asteroids.

In February 1977, James Arnold, a UCSD chemistry professor, had spoken with NASA Administrator Fletcher about making the exploitation of near-Earth space resources a major new focus for NASA. He subsequently summed up his thoughts in a detailed two-page letter to Fletcher. Three years later, Arnold became the first director of Calspace, which had its origins in California Governor Jerry Brown’s enthusiasm for technological development in his state.

Arnold’s deputy in 1983-1984, planetary scientist Stewart Nozette, organized the La Jolla workshop, which brought together 36 prominent scientists and engineers from aerospace companies, national laboratories, NASA centers, the Department of Defense, and defense think-tanks to weigh in on SDI’s potential use of moon and asteroid resources. Nozette also edited the workshop report, which Arnold submitted to Fletcher on 18 August 1983. A revised version of the workshop report was completed on 31 October 1983; this post is based upon the latter version.

In the late 1970s, NASA, aerospace companies, and universities expended a great deal of time and effort on planning large structures – for example, Solar Power Satellites – that would be assembled in space. Some of these plans relied on space resources. In the cover letter to the La Jolla workshop report, Nozette explained that these studies, though conducted “in an unfocused and low priority vein,” had laid the groundwork for SDI exploitation of moon and asteroid resources. The La Jolla workshop was, he added, the first to consider the defense implications of the 1970s concepts.

At the time of the La Jolla workshop, relatively little was known of near-Earth space resources. Five Lunar Orbiter spacecraft had imaged much of the moon at modest resolution and selected portions of it – most corresponding to potential Apollo landing sites – at higher resolution. NASA had landed Apollo astronauts at six sites between 1969 and 1972 and scientists had analyzed many of the more than 2400 geologic samples they collected. In addition, Apollo astronauts had surveyed the moon from lunar orbit using remote sensors. These provided low-resolution data on the composition of perhaps 10% of the lunar surface.

Scientists had hypothesized since 1961 that permanently shadowed craters at the lunar poles might contain ice deposited by comet impacts. The lunar poles, far from the “Apollo Zone” – the near-equatorial region where orbital mechanics dictated the Apollo Lunar Modules could land – nevertheless remained unexplored.

Written by Randy McDonald

February 26, 2015 at 11:28 pm

[LINK] “A new mission for Akatsuki, and status updates for Hayabusa 2 and Chang’e”

The Planetary Society Blog’s Emily Lakdawalla has a nice update about the status of Japan’s Akatsuki Venus probe and its Hayabusa 2 asteroid probe, along with China’s Chang’e lunar missions.

Written by Randy McDonald

February 10, 2015 at 11:39 pm

[BLOG] Some Monday links

  • Bad Astronomy’s Phil Plait does explain the question of whether or not the Moon is a planet.
  • blogTO notes that the old Kodak lands on Eglinton will be repurposed for mass transit and observes that Stollery’s at Yonge and Bloor is already being demolished.
  • Crooked Timber notes, looking back in American history, that people who have accused others of playing the “race card” are actually overlooking serious grievances.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze notes Kepler’s detection of more than twenty thousand exoplanet signals and notes a new method for estimating the mass and age of stars with transiting planets.
  • Geocurrents notes that the site is being suspended, hopefully temporarily.
  • Joe. My. God. notes that Minneapolis’ Roman Catholic archdiocese has declared bankruptcy, putting compensation to victims of clerical sexual abuse in jeopardy.
  • Marginal Revolution argues that a majority of American public school students are not in poverty, at least not if we go by the barometer of free lunches.
  • The Numerati’s Stephen Baker argues in favour of the virtues of unregulated hate speech.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer notes that the Nicaragua canal is already seeing a course adjustment.
  • Registan notes that Putin’s Russia is loved by proponents of the men’s rights movement.
  • Towleroad profiles out star Alan Cumming.
  • Transit Toronto notes that consultations for the Scaroborough subway extension are imminent.
  • Window on Eurasia notes China’s interest in supplying nuclear fuel to central and eastern Europe and observes the disintegration of the old German churches of Kaliningrad.

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