A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘national identity

[BLOG] Some Friday links

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  • The Big Picture shares shocking photos of the Portuguese forest fires.
  • blogTO notes that, happily, Seaton Village’s Fiesta Farms is apparently not at risk of being turned into a condo development site.
  • Centauri Dreams notes a new starship discussion group in Delft. Shades of the British Interplanetary Society and the Daedalus?
  • D-Brief considers a new theory explaining why different birds’ eggs have different shapes.
  • The Frailest Thing’s Michael Sacasas commits himself to a new regimen of blogging about technology and its imports. (There is a Patreon.)
  • Language Hat notes the current Turkish government’s interest in purging Turkish of Western loanwords.
  • Language Log’s Victor Mair sums up the evidence for the diffusion of Indo-European languages, and their speakers, into India.
  • The LRB Blog notes the Theresa May government’s inability post-Grenfell to communicate with any sense of emotion.
  • Marginal Revolution’s Tyler Cowen wonders if the alt-right more prominent in the Anglophone world because it is more prone to the appeal of the new.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw wonders if Brexit will result in a stronger European Union and a weaker United Kingdom.
  • Seriously Science reports a study suggesting that shiny new headphones are not better than less flashy brands.
  • Torontoist reports on the anti-Muslim hate groups set to march in Toronto Pride.
  • Understanding Society considers the subject of critical realism in sociological analyses.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how Russia’s call to promote Cyrillic across the former Soviet Union has gone badly in Armenia, with its own script.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

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  • Centauri Dreams looks at the complex prebiotic chemistry in the system of young triple IRAS 16293-2422.
  • Language Hat looks at the central role played by Kyrgzystan writer Chinghiz Aitmatov in shaping Kyrgyz identity.
  • The Map Room Blog shares Baltimore’s new transit map.
  • Steve Munro examines the Ford family’s various issues with TTC streetcars.
  • The Russian Demographics Blog reports on the latest UN report on the Donbas and the conflict there.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that the number of ethnic Russians in the former Soviet Union has fallen sharply through demographic change including assimilation.

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

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  • Crooked Timber enthuses over the remixing, or remastering, of arguably the Beatles’ most iconic album.
  • Far Outliers notes the Albanian language’s alphabet struggles in the wider geopolitics of Albania.
  • Joe. My. God. notes an American soccer player opted to quit rather than to wear a Pride jersey.
  • Language Hat notes a new online atlas of Algonquian languages.
  • The NYRB Daily argues that Theresa May’s election defeat makes the fantasy of a hard Brexit, at least, that much less possible.
  • Window on Eurasia notes Russia’s concern at the dissipation of the prestige of its language and script in its former empire, especially in Ukraine.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

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  • blogTO notes that the old HMV store in the Dufferin Mall is now a fidget spinner store. This has gone viral.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly talks about her week in Paris.
  • Centauri Dreams notes one paper examining the complex formation of the dense TRAPPIST-1 system.
  • Far Outliers reports from early 20th century Albania, about how tribal and language and ethnic identities overlap, and not.
  • Language Log notes efforts to promote Cantonese in the face of Mandarin.
  • The LRB Blog wonders if May’s electoral defeat might lead to the United Kingdom changing its Brexit trajectory.
  • Marginal Revolution notes that cars have more complex computer programming these days than fighter jets.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer notes that the counter-cyclical Brazilian fiscal cap still makes no sense.
  • Window on Eurasia argues that Russia is edging towards an acknowledgement of its involvement in the Ukrainian war.

[LINK] The National Post on the Patriote flag

The National Post has a feature from Graeme Hamilton noting the controversy associated in Québec with the flag of the Patriote rebels of 1837.

On May 22, as the rest of Canada celebrates Victoria Day, Quebecers will get a day off in honour of les Patriotes, the 19th-century rebels who fought to bring responsible government to what is now Quebec. It’s no surprise that the mostly French-speaking province isn’t terribly keen on paying tribute to a long-dead British monarch, and such Patriote leaders as Louis-Joseph Papineau, Jean-Olivier Chénier and Wolfred Nelson are worthy of celebration. Yet last week, Quebec’s Liberal government angered nationalists by blocking a proposal to have the Patriote flag fly above the legislature in Quebec City.

Q: Who were the Patriotes?

Charles Alexander Smith via Wikipedia
Charles Alexander Smith via Wikipedia”Assemblée des six-comtés”, a painting depicting the Assembly of the Six Counties, held in Saint-Charles, Lower Canada on October 23 and October 24, 1837
A: The Patriotes was the name given to Papineau’s Parti canadien and the popular movement he and others inspired to rise up against British colonial rule in 1837-38. “The primarily francophone party, led mainly by members of the liberal professions and small-scale merchants, was widely supported by farmers, day-labourers and craftsmen,” the Canadian Encyclopedia says. They advocated democracy and the right to self-government, but at the same time they were in no hurry to get rid of the seigneurial system. After the rebellion was crushed, many participants were imprisoned, exiled or hung.

Q: What is the Patriote flag?

A: The flag was introduced in 1832 by Papineau’s political party and was carried at political speeches and into battle during the rebellion. It is a simple design consisting of three horizontal bars, green, white and red from top to bottom. The flag was seen by the Montreal aristocracy as a revolutionary symbol, and in 1837 the Montreal Herald wrote urging people to destroy it. Some early versions also featured a beaver, a maple leaf or a maskinonge fish. Today, the flag often has the profile of a musket-toting, toque-wearing, pipe-smoking rebel superimposed in the centre.

Written by Randy McDonald

May 16, 2017 at 11:29 pm

[BLOG] Some Friday links

  • blogTO looks at deserted Mirvish Village.
  • Crooked Timber reenages with the Rachel Carson and DDT myth.
  • The Crux looks at the Mandela Effect, exploring false memories.
  • Dangerous Minds makes the case for the musical genius of Bobbie Gentry.
  • From the Heart of Europe’s Nicholas Whyte recounts his visit to Albania’s bunker museum.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes Brazil’s retirement of its only aircraft carrier.
  • The LRB Blog looks at the extent and speed of events in the Trump Administration.
  • Marginal Revolution engages with a book examining France’s carving out a “cultural exception” in international trade agreements.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw reports on the passing of rulership of the Australian micronation of Hutt River.
  • Peter Rukavina shares good advice for visiting museums: visit only what you can take in.
  • Window on Eurasia looks at Russian Orthodox Church opposition to a certain kind of Russian civic nationality, and argues Russia is losing even its regional superpower status.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell reports on how local councils in the United Kingdom are speculating on commercial property.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

  • blogTO notes that a Toronto family known for its Christmas lights display may be forced to ratchet back by city inspectors.
  • Centauri Dreams notes the apparent discovery of Kuiper Belt objects around white dwarf WD 1425+540.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to one paper examining the possible orbital inclination of Proxima Centauri b, and points to another one speculating about upper limits to the masses of other exoplanets orbiting P_roxima Centauri.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money links to interviews with different historians noting how close the United States is to a scenario from 1930s Germany.
  • The LRB Blog notes that the actions of the American deep state to undermine elements of the Trump Administration seen as potentially threatening will certainly also undermine American democracy.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw looks at reasons for the continuing gap in life outcomes between indigenous and non-indigenous Australians.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer links to a paper looking at the effect of Huey Long’s populism on Louisiana’s economy, noting that he had little effect on the markets. This suggests that counting on the markets to reign in populists before the crash may be a mistake.
  • Strange Maps links to a map and history of the Gagauz of Moldova.
  • Torontoist looks at the continuing decline of live music venues in Toronto.
  • Towleroad notes the origins of Der Spiegel‘s cover art showing Trump with the severed head of lady liberty in a Cuban exile’s work.
  • Window on Eurasia notes differences between how Russians and Americans think about ethnicity and citizenship in their diverse societies.