A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘national identity

[BLOG] Some Monday links

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  • Anthrodendum’s Alex Golub talks about anthropologists of the 20th century who resisted fascism.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes a study suggesting the TRAPPIST-1 system might be substantially older than our own solar system.
  • Centauri Dreams considers tidal locking as a factor relevant to Earth-like planetary environments.
  • The Crux shows efforts to help the piping plover in its home on the dunes of the Great Lakes coast of Pennsylvania.
  • Dead Things considers the evidence for the presence of modern humans in Sumatra 73 thousand years ago.
  • Bruce Dorminey makes the case for placing a lunar base not on the poles, but rather in the material-rich nearside highlands.
  • Far Outliers shares some evocative placenames from Japan, like Togakushi (‘door-hiding’) from ninja training spaces.
  • Language Hat notes the exceptionally stylistically uneven Spanish translation of the Harry Potter series.
  • Language Log thinks, among other things, modern technologies make language learning easier than ever before.
  • The LRB Blog notes how claims to trace modern Greece directly to the Mycenaean era are used to justify ultranationalism.
  • Marginal Revolution considers which countries are surrounded by enemies. (India rates poorly by this metric.)
  • The Numerati’s Stephen Baker considers how Confederate statues are products of recycling, like so much in our lives.
  • The NYR Daily considers the unique importance of Thomas Jefferson, a man at once statesman and slaver.
  • The Planetary Society Blog celebrated the 40th anniversary of the launch of Voyager 2 Sunday.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer notes that, for a country fighting a drug war, Mexico spends astonishingly little on its police force.
  • Drew Rowsome takes a look at classic John Wayne Western, The Train Robbers.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel considers the critical role of NASA’s Planetary Protection Officer.
  • Strange Company notes the many legends surrounding the early 19th century US’ Theodosia Burr.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy hosts Ilya Somin’ argument against world government, as something limiting of freedom. Thoughts?
  • Window on Eurasia notes how Ukrainians are turning from Russia, becoming more foreign to their one-time partner.

[NEWS] Seven French Canada links, from Louisbourg to Québec islands to politics to economics

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  • The Globe and Mail describes a salvage archaeology operation in Cape Breton, on the receding shores of Louisbourg at Rochefort Point.
  • Katie Ingram at MacLean’s notes the hostile reaction in Atlantic Canada to the consolidation of artifacts in a Québec facility.
  • The National Observer reports on how Québec has effectively banned the oil and gas industry from operating on Anticosti Island.
  • This La Presse article talks about letting, or not, the distant Iles-de-la-Madeleine keep their own Québec electoral riding notwithstanding their small population.
  • Will the Bloc Québécois go the way of the Créditistes and other Québec regional protest movements? Éric Grenier considers at CBC.
  • The National Post describes the remarkable improvement of the Québec economy in recent years, in absolute and relative terms. Québec a have?
  • Francine Pelletier argues Québec fears for the future have to do with a sense of particular vulnerability.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

  • Centauri Dreams considers the challenges and the prospects of laser SETI.
  • Citizen Science Salon reports on a couple who have done their best to keep their bee numbers up.
  • Joe. My. God. notes that Milo’s book, contrary to Milo’s claims, has performed very badly indeed in the UK, among other places.
  • Language Log features a poetic digression by Victor Mair on Chinese characters for words like “plum” and “wine.”
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money suggests that moderate Republicans in Congress might not be all that.
  • The LRB Blog considers Nice at, and after, the time of last year’s terrorist attacks.
  • Marginal Revolution features Tyler Cowen’s description of his writing processes.
  • Drew Rowsome interviews Toronto gay photographer Dylan Rosser.
  • Unicorn Booty looks back at the history of the queercore movement–gay punk, as a first approximation.
  • Vintage Space links to an article explaining why there was neither an Apollo 2 nor an Apollo 3.
  • Window on Eurasia suggests the Russian state is undermining various once-allied Russian nationalist movements.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

  • Citizen Science Salon links to some ongoing crowdsourced experiments that non-scientists can take part in.
  • The LRB Blog reports on the return of Newt Gingrich to the American political scene.
  • The NYR Daily compares Donald Trump to a 19th century counterpart, Andrew Jackson.
  • Roads and Kingdoms reports on the now rather different cocaine problem of Medellín, Colombia.
  • Starts with a Bang’s Ethan Siegel reports on a paper suggesting potential problems with gravitational observatory LIGO.
  • Towleroad notes a recent sharp drop in new HIV diagnoses in the United Kingdom, thanks to treatment and PrEP.
  • Window on Eurasia reports on projected long-run economic decline in Russia, argues about the potential for instability in Tatarstan, and reports on Belarusianization.
  • Arnold Zwicky describes Silver Age Rainbow Batman and his later pride appearances.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

  • Language Hat blogs about appearances of Nahuatl in Los Angeles, in television and in education.
  • Language Log talks about “Zhonghua minzu”, meaning “Chinese nation” or “Chinese race” depending on the translation.
  • Marginal Revolution notes that Canada, with inelastic production, might have a marijuana shortage come legalization/
  • In the NYR Daily, Christopher de Bellaigue wonders if Britain–the West, even–might be on the verge of a descent into communal violence.
  • Peter Rukavina looks at the accessibility of VIA Rail’s data on trade arrivals and departures.
  • Starts with a Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes that, in the far distant starless future, the decay of binary brown dwarf orbits can still start stars.
  • Torontoist shares photos of the Dyke March.
  • Window on Eurasia argues that Tatarstan’s tradition of bourgeois and intellectually critical nationalism could have wider consequences, in Russia and beyond.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

  • The Big Picture shares shocking photos of the Portuguese forest fires.
  • blogTO notes that, happily, Seaton Village’s Fiesta Farms is apparently not at risk of being turned into a condo development site.
  • Centauri Dreams notes a new starship discussion group in Delft. Shades of the British Interplanetary Society and the Daedalus?
  • D-Brief considers a new theory explaining why different birds’ eggs have different shapes.
  • The Frailest Thing’s Michael Sacasas commits himself to a new regimen of blogging about technology and its imports. (There is a Patreon.)
  • Language Hat notes the current Turkish government’s interest in purging Turkish of Western loanwords.
  • Language Log’s Victor Mair sums up the evidence for the diffusion of Indo-European languages, and their speakers, into India.
  • The LRB Blog notes the Theresa May government’s inability post-Grenfell to communicate with any sense of emotion.
  • Marginal Revolution’s Tyler Cowen wonders if the alt-right more prominent in the Anglophone world because it is more prone to the appeal of the new.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw wonders if Brexit will result in a stronger European Union and a weaker United Kingdom.
  • Seriously Science reports a study suggesting that shiny new headphones are not better than less flashy brands.
  • Torontoist reports on the anti-Muslim hate groups set to march in Toronto Pride.
  • Understanding Society considers the subject of critical realism in sociological analyses.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how Russia’s call to promote Cyrillic across the former Soviet Union has gone badly in Armenia, with its own script.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

  • Centauri Dreams looks at the complex prebiotic chemistry in the system of young triple IRAS 16293-2422.
  • Language Hat looks at the central role played by Kyrgzystan writer Chinghiz Aitmatov in shaping Kyrgyz identity.
  • The Map Room Blog shares Baltimore’s new transit map.
  • Steve Munro examines the Ford family’s various issues with TTC streetcars.
  • The Russian Demographics Blog reports on the latest UN report on the Donbas and the conflict there.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that the number of ethnic Russians in the former Soviet Union has fallen sharply through demographic change including assimilation.