A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘national identity

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

  • The Buzz recommends twenty-four different novels for Valentine’s Day, drawing on the recommendations of employees of the Toronto Public Library.
  • Centauri Dreams links to a new paper suggesting there are thousands of objects of extrasolar origin, some tens of kilometres in size, in our planetary system right now.
  • D-Brief notes that cryptocurrency is hindering the search for extraterrestrial life, as miners buy up the graphics cards SETI researchers need.
  • Lyman Stone at In A State of Migration notes how unbalanced the marriage market can be for professional women in the United States interested in similar partners, especially for African-American women.
  • JSTOR Daily notes how deeply the dreams of Martin Luther King Jr. for racial equality in the United States were driven by anti-colonial nationalism in Africa.
  • The LRB Blog notes how the life and writing of Penelope Fitzgerald was influenced by two decades of living on the English coast, suspended between land and water.
  • At the NYR Daily, Melissa Chadburn tells of what she learned from counting, and queueing, and perservering in routines.
  • At The Numerati, Stephen Baker shares an excerpt from his new book, Dark Site, describing a teenager’s attempts to control a cognitive implant.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer takes issue with elements of the timing of Lyman Stone’s schedule for immigration controls imposed in the United Kingdom on Caribbean migrants.
  • At the Planetary Society Blog, Emily Lakdawalla explains how scientists are keeping the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter in good stead despite its age.
  • At Roads and Kingdoms, Timi Siytangco explains the history of the Philippines through nine Filipino foods.
  • Drew Rowsome is impressed by the power of The Assassination of Gianni Versace.
  • Ethan Siegel at Starts With A Bang explains why black holes have to contain singularities, not merely superdense normal matter.
  • Window on Eurasia notes the rather misogynistic essay of ideologue Vladimir Surkin about women and power, timed for Valentine’s Day.

[NEWS] Five culture links: archeology in Canada, Baker Boy, Threads, Ukrainian churches, Kanopy

  • Archeology in Canada is starting to take a leading role in the reconciliation process with First Nations. The Globe and Mail reports.
  • Baker Boy, an Australian Aborigine rapper from the Milingimbi community, is becoming a star with his raps in his native Yolngu Matha language. (Touring with 50 Cent is an achievement.) Australia’s SBS carries the story.
  • Threads, the infamous 1984 British film depicting the aftermath of nuclear war, is coming to Blu-ray. VICE’s Motherboard reports.
  • Andrei Fert writes at Open Democracy about how, after the appalling refusal of a priest in a Moscow-aligned Ukrainian Orthodox church to preside over the burial of a toddler baptized into a Kyiv-aligned church, that whole denomination is coming into disrepute.
  • blogTO notes the introduction, by the Toronto Public Library, of a new video streaming service, Kanopy, offering more than thirty thousand movies free to members.

[URBAN NOTE] Six cities: Saint John, New York City. Brooklyn, Cape Town, Kingston, Istanbul, Dubai

  • The metropolitan area of Saint John, in New Brunswick, is investigating the possibility of a general municipal amalgamation. Myself, I suspect cost savings would be limited. Global News reports.
  • Having been in Brooklyn–having, in fact, been in Williamsburg–I can only imagine the catastrophe that the extended shutdown of the L subway line will have on local nightlife. I hope they can adapt. VICE reports.
  • A Cape Town that faces a possible water shortage–perhaps a probable water shortage, given weather patterns–is going to feel a lot of pain. MacLean’s reports.
  • If Kingston is moving away from honouring Canada’s first prime minister and hometown son, John A. MacDonald, on account of his governments’ policies towards indigenous peoples, this indicates a sea change. Global News reports.
  • Ezgi Tuncer examines how Syrians displaced to Istanbul have integrated into their new home through, among other things, selling their traditional foods to Syrians and Turks alike, over at Open Democracy.
  • Is Dubai truly a good example of a modernized Middle Eastern economy? I wonder. Bloomberg makes the argument.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly talks about her love for New York’s famous, dynamic, Hudson River.
  • Centauri Dreams notes the amazing potential for pulsar navigation to provide almost absolutely reliable guidance across the space of at least a galaxy.
  • Far Outliers notes the massive scale of German losses in France after the Normandy invasion.
  • Hornet Stories looks at the latest on theories as to the origin of homosexuality.
  • Joe. My. God remembers Dr. Mathilde Krim, dead this week at 91, one of the early medical heroes of HIV/AIDS in New York City.
  • JSTOR Daily takes a look at what, exactly, is K-POP.
  • Language Log notes that, in Xinjiang, the Chinese government has opted to repress education in the Mongolian language.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money suggests that the risk of war in Korea is less than the media suggests.
  • At Chronicle’s Lingua Franca, Ben Yagoda looks at redundancy in writing styles.
  • The NYR Daily looks at the complex relationship of French publishing house Gallimard to Céline and his Naziphile anti-Semitism.
  • The Planetary Society Blog looks at the latest images of Venus from Japan’s Akatsuki probe.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer notes the apparent willingness of Trump to use a wall with Mexico–tariffs, particularly–to pay for the wall.
  • Spacing reviews a new book examining destination architecture.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel considers what I think is a plausible concept: Could be that there are plenty of aliens out there and we are just missing them?
  • At Strange Maps, Frank Jacobs shares a map of “Tabarnia”, the region of Catalonia around Barcelona that is skeptical of Catalonian separatism and is being positioned half-seriously as another secessionist entity.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that an actively used language is hardly the only mechanism by which a separatist identity can exist.

[NEWS] Five links about diverse Canada; Terry Fox & Métis, First Nations businesses, refugees, Tibet

  • Suggestions that the family of Canadian hero Terry Fox have Métis ancestry and can claim Métis identity are, among other things, timely. The Globe and Mail reports.
  • National Observer notes the growing foothold of First Nations businesses in Canadian cities.
  • Identity is becoming complex in an increasingly multiethnic and intermixed Canada. The Globe and Mail reports.
  • Québec companies are turning to some of the incoming wave of asylum seekers from the United States in the search for workers. CBC reports.
  • The Toronto Star profiles two Tibetan-Canadians who are fulfilling their childhood dreams by heading off to be educated as dentists.

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

  • Anthro{dendum} examines the politics and the problems involved with accurately representing the history of Taiwan to the world.
  • Centauri Dreams notes a paper suggesting not only that it is possible for a pulsar to have a circumstellar habitable zone, but that the known worlds of PSR B1257+12 might well fall into this zone. (!) D-Brief also looks at the topic of pulsar planets and circumstellar habitable zones.
  • The Crux reports on how some students are making the case that robotic cricket farming could help feed the world.
  • Dangerous Minds shares some Carlo Farneti illustrations for an edition of Baudelaire’s Les Fleurs du Mal.
  • Cody Delistraty writes about the last days of a Paris store, Colette.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes that an infrared search for Planet Nine, using WISE and NEOWISE, has turned up nothing.
  • JSTOR Daily talks about how the spectre of “white slavery” was used a century ago, in the United States, to justify Progressive reformers.
  • Language Hat reports on a former diplomat’s efforts to translate the traditional poetry of Najd, in central Saudi Arabia.
  • Language Log takes a look at the ways in which zebra finches learn song, when raised in isolation and otherwise.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money argues in favour of putting up new monuments, to better people, in place of old Confederate memorials.
  • Marginal Revolution links to a paper suggesting that the food desert effect is limited, that if poor people choose not to eat healthy foods this relates to their choice not to a lack of options for buying said.
  • The Planetary Society Blog reports on China’s interest in a Mars sample return mission.
  • Seriously Science reports a paper claiming straight women tend to prefer to get dating advice from gay men to getting it from other women.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel makes the point that, without much more funding for NASA, there is going to be no American return to the Moon.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that Tatarstan will no longer be providing Tatar inserts for Russian passport users, a sign of Tatarstan’s drifting towards the Russian mainstream.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

  • Andrew Barton quite approves of the Helsinki Metro.
  • Anthropology.net notes the complexity of the peopling of Eurasia, over hundreds of thousands of years and with multiple human populations.
  • Daily JSTOR has an insightful take on the fiction of the free market, looking back to Peter Drucker.
  • Far Outliers notes that the role missionaries played in the development of area studies.
  • At A Fistful of Euros, Alex Harrowell takes a look at the complexities of the latest Brexit negotiations, concentrating on the DUP and Ireland.
  • At The Frailest Thing, Michael Sacasas notes the addition of a Paypal option alongside Patreon and asks for feedback.
  • Hornet Stories notes that the Gengoroh Tagame manga My Brother’s Husband is set for a television adaptation.
  • Language Log takes a look at the complexities surrounding a piece of Maoist rhetoric. Did Mao actually say that the Chinese people stood up at Tiannamen in 1949?
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money looks at the rhetoric surrounding parkland in Utah. Who is it being protected for, and what do these people have to gain from the despoliation?
  • Marginal Revolution looks at a study of Switzerland suggesting that clear boundaries have helped maintain communal peace there.
  • At the NYR Daily, Tim Parks has a lovely essay exploring the importance of the translator as a sort of secondary creator.
  • Window on Eurasia looks at Tatarstan, and argues post-Soviet governments there made a mistake by concentrating on parallel Tatar and Russian cultures, as opposed to propagating Tatar language and culture for all.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell suggests that, in British political life, there are two working cultures, politicians who derive authority from merit and politicians who derive authority from brilliance. Guess who fares worse?